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KennethT

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Everything posted by KennethT

  1. KennethT

    Iconic noodles dishes

    @liuzhou I was in my local Korean grocery, saw this and thought of you...
  2. KennethT

    Query about frozen food

    Self defrosting freezers have heater wires embedded in the sides - they periodically turn on (while the compressor is off). While it doesn't raise the temp of the freezer in general, anything located right next to the wall will definitely be affected more than it would be in a non-self defrosting freezer that has a much more stable (and usually lower) temperature. Also, laydown freezers don't warm up nearly as much when the lid is opened than when an upright freezer has its door opened.
  3. KennethT

    Query about frozen food

    I don't know... I've heard people complain about freezer taste (I'm not sure I know what that tastes like, but I think it has to do with oxidation or maybe fats going rancid), or dryness...
  4. KennethT

    Query about frozen food

    I think that if your food is well wrapped so there is little to no air contact, and you have a very cold freezer that is non-defrosting, you can store meat much longer. My parents had a huge laydown freezer that was kept at like -15F and we commonly had meats and roasts that were a couple years old with no issues, and no freezer burn. Standard refrigerator/freezers don't get cold enough, and the constant defrost cycle degrades the quality of long-stored things inside.
  5. This is similar to the dish I had - it was at EMP right after they changed format from bistro to fine dining... they were MUCH less expensive back then! http://blog.chefsteps.com/2014/06/midnight-snack-video-daniel-humm-avocado-prawn-roulade/
  6. I had a great dish in a fine dining restaurant many years ago - it was crabmeat rolled in a tube made from thin slices of haas avocado... I forget the details of it, but I remember that it was insanely good.
  7. My wife and I will be spending a short holiday in South Island over Christmas this year.... we're planning on spending most of our time seeing the many natural wonders of Otago - we're not really into bungee jumping or anything like that - but we do like hiking with nice scenery, kayaking, and other non-energetic stuff! We were thinking about staying in Queenstown as it seems to be central to a lot of the attractions of the region. We'll have a car, and don't mind a bit of driving - I'm actually looking forward to driving on the left side of the road, and driving around beautiful scenery with very little traffic - it will be a nice change of pace from my daily commute here in New York City! Is this a good idea, or are there any suggestions on other places we should use as a base of operations instead? Also, please chime in with any dining recommendations as well for good local fare...
  8. @blue_dolphin Thanks for your thoughts. Is Queenstown very loud and raucous? We were looking for something tranquil with great scenery. There seem to be some nice hotels in Queenstown that seem to have lake and mountain views, which is great, just as long as we're not surrounded by a bunch of party-ers or something like that.
  9. KennethT

    Philips Avance Grill

    One of the Solaire products I linked to above is really small... Like 1 hamburger at a time small. It would be perfect for a small kitchen... I do worry about the smoke though....
  10. KennethT

    Philips Avance Grill

    I was looking into tabletop IR grills a long time ago, but never wound up getting it as I live in a small apartment with no outside ventilation. While I love the process of putting a shower cap on my smoke alarm, if it gets too smoky, the neighbors get worried.... But at the time, I was looking into these: https://solairegasgrills.com/products/portable-grills/
  11. KennethT

    Dinner 2019

    I think it's a burger in a mo....
  12. KennethT

    Dinner 2019

    If you ever come to NYC, you HAVE to go to Murray's original store in the West Village... it will blow your mind...
  13. KennethT

    Dinner 2019

    Holy crap! Did Murray's open a store local to you or do they ship? I love Murray's!
  14. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    I know what you're saying... you can actually get started for very little $$$... it doesn't take that much to keep plants happy. For me personally, I've been doing experiments in growing high value crops indoors as a business.. I have some extra warehouse space, and I enjoy doing this stuff, so I figured it would be a good fit. But growing for $ vs growing for yourself is very different, at least if you want to be profitable. To get there, it's all about optimization, getting the best tasting, highest yields out of the least amount of resources.
  15. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    There's nothing bad about using fluorescent shop lights for seed starting - it's actually very common. Large growers have switched to LEDs for this just because it saves a ton of $ on energy usage, but the upfront cost is pretty high. Before I switched to LED, I used a cheap CFL for seed starting and cloning... it worked great. In fact, fluorescents are good for it because they put out a good amount of blue light and not as much red which helps keep plants from getting leggy.
  16. Never had it myself, but Superiority Burger gets really good reviews
  17. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @dcarch Exactly. I've done a lot of research into light and plant response... it's a lot more complicated than people think. Many years ago, researchers found that Chlorophyll A and B are most efficient at producing sugar when exposed to 2 different wavelengths - the blue and red, that when combined, form that magenta color that so many plant lights use. It is also a happy accident that those colors are the most efficient in energy usage for LEDs. As time has gone on, however, researchers have found that other wavelengths are important also... far-red induces plant stretch - too much far-red causes leggy plants... it turns out that when plants are shaded, there is a large amount of far-red present in sunlight shade - so plants developed a response to grow taller when in shade to try to get out of the shade. Conversely, short wavelengths - like the blues, cause very limited stretch and will create much more compact plants. For years, many people thought that green wasn't used at all by plants, but now, we know that is not true - while green is not very efficient for creating sugar for the plant, it does have a big role in plant morphology. Also, green light is transmitted through the canopy, whereas the reds and blues are almost completely absorbed by the top of the canopy, leaving the underlying leaves in shade. Having green in the spectrum allows more light to penetrate the canopy, giving more light to the underlying leaves - even if they don't utilize green as efficiently for photosynthesis, it is used, and some light is much better than practically nothing. UV triggers plants to create more terpenes (the smell and flavor molecules) because these molecules help protect the plant from UV damage. Personally, if I'm growing in a completely indoor environment that never sees natural sunlight, I'd want to use a full spectrum (looks white) light rather than just the blue and red. But, if I'm in a greenhouse (or sunny windowsill), the blue and red is fine because it boosts photosynthesis, and the plant can get its other cues from the sunlight.
  18. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @TicTac Sunglasses generally work in a simple way. Different materials (plastics) are transparent above certain wavelengths, but opaque to wavelengths below that threshold. As an example, I was looking into getting a manufacturing laser for work, and when you use these types of equipment, special safety glasses are necessary - but the glasses aren't really all that special - they're made from a type of plastic that is opaque to UV (which is the wavelength the laser puts out). In fact, the glasses look clear, because they are transparent to wavelengths above UV. Sunglasses, in general, are made from plastic that is opaque to UV, but are tinted to dim all the light coming through them so it's comfortable to be out in bright sunshine without squinting. So, normal sunglasses that say they block UV will protect your eyes from your light, but the "special" glasses would help with color correction so things don't look so purple, so you can identify problems with your plants. ETA - if you don't want the special glasses, just put a normal type of light to inspect your plants for problems - you turn it on during inspection, then turn it off.
  19. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @TicTac OK, I just checked out KIND's specs... I had always heard of them, but never got into the nitty-gritty. According to their website, they include UV in their spectrum - it seems that their spectrum goes down to about 380nm (they don't specify directly, but that's what I inferred from their spectrum diagram). In their FAQ, they mention using protective glasses because the lights are so bright, and color corrective glasses to make it easier to see what you're doing while in the purply-ness which, without color correction, it can be challenging to identify nutrient deficiencies, etc. The main light I have (made by Fluence) is full spectrum white - but it is made up of hundreds of LEDs of different colors to put out a specific spectrum in specific quantities. So, if you look at the spectral outlet of my light, its "white" is very different from a fluorescent "white" which is not tuned to create a specific spectrum, but instead made to put a "color temperature" which basically is the ratio of blue to red. But, they specify in their information that the lowest wavelength is just above UV - so eye protection is not required - although if the light is on full brightness (an average PPFD of 1450 umol/m2/s!!) and you were spending any time under it, you' d probably want to wear sunglasses because it's like looking directly at the sun (without the UV or infrared, and very little far-red).
  20. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @TicTac I'm not @dcarch but what I think he meant by that is that within your light bar, each individual LED puts out a single wavelength. Light bars put out a spectrum by using lots of different types of LEDs. COBs are similar, but the many different LEDs are packaged within a single unit.
  21. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @TicTac If you're concerned about UV, you need to contact the manufacturer of your light for its spectral output. I don't know where the statement "most quality LED grow lights produce UV rays" comes from. Also, I think a lot of articles in MY are written by writers who have no growing experience... much of what I've read from them is filler that is just general information that seems to be regurgitated over and over. Personally, my main grow light does not produce any light below 400nm, and the amount emitted in the region between 400 and 430nm is so low, (and my exposure time is so short - I don't spend that much time hanging out under the light) I'm not concerned about it. I would assume that since @dcarch built his light from COBs himself, he would have access to the spectral output of the COBs and would know whether or not his lights pose any risk to him.... but again, most people don't hang out for long periods of time under their lights, so health risk is minimized by small amounts of exposure... it would be different if you're working in a greenhouse or an indoor farm that utilizes UV - some indoor cannabis farms specifically use large amounts of UV (there are even pro lights you can get that only emit UV) during the last couple weeks of flower as it encourages terpene output - so glasses and sunscreen or cover up is definitely necessary then.
  22. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @dcarch Where did you get the heatsinks?
  23. KennethT

    Dinner 2019

    @sartoric Very nice... but where's the sweet soy sauce?
  24. KennethT

    Gardening: (2016– )

    @dcarch Very nice! You probably don't need to verify for seedlings, but rather than looking at it from a brightness scale, the best thing to do is to get a PAR sensor to check PPFD at plant level. Apogee makes great, affordable sensors that you can plug into a USB port on your computer and read the value using their free software.
  25. While I have no experience with professional pastry or food of any kind, I have a lot of experience running a labor intensive factory. If equipment is too expensive, I'd start by trying to get the most out of your team. First, break down your process into small chunks. Labels on bags can be one operation, adding silica another, product, sealing etc. Then divide your staff so one person does one job at a time and batch your work so each step is very repetitive. That's part of the key - the repetitive motions will get refined over time and will go much faster. The other issue is employee motivation. I find nothing motivates people doing boring repetitive work like money. We use an incentive system that is quite effective in getting the most out of our employees and keeps wasted time and motions to a minimum. Basically you create a realistic rate for each job. The rate should seem impossible to a new employee who is all thumbs, but an experienced, motivated worker can do 20% more than the rate. In addition to the base rate of pay, you pay extra for production that is faster than the rate, but the quality of the work can't suffer for it. But, if the worker does 5 hours worth of work (according to the rate) in say 4 hours, they would be paid for 4 hours + 1 hour production bonus.
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