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Hawthorne

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  1. Bump this; it's nearly time to start thinking about Christmas dinner again! Not that we'll be doing roast beef this year, due to the economy, but I did think it might be useful to add a couple of things. Find a butcher who will sell you a roast which still owns it's own fat. That is, it hasn't been trimmed. You can't make YP (or roasted potatoes) without beef fat. And where I live, if you can't find a place who'll take a special order, even a very rich prime rib may not give up enough fat for accompaniments. Something needs to be done about this situation. I am capable of trimming my own meat,
  2. Oooh ... I don't really get very creative this way as a rule, but I have certainly got to try a couple ... or a few .. of these soon! Another thing I'm going to try soon (which I just read about the other day as a sauce for something there is no way I'm ever going to make in its entirety), is basil mayonnaise. I've put all kinds of things in mayo for one reason or another, but basil sounds like it might be a winner. How did I miss that??
  3. Bump this .. This thread sure isn't doing much - I hope that doesn't mean that last year's experiments were a bust! In any case, I haven't really got much further ahead since I posted that last message, but my Uncle wrote me not long after wanting to know if I wanted my Aunt's pudding basins .. well, I certainly did, and he's sent them to me! Only one of them could really be called 'small', but I'm convinced they'll freeze, and I'll bet they can be warmed up nicely in the micro wave :-) No sense having all this nifty technology if you don't use it! Here they are: So .. time to check out
  4. So .. shall I try this recipe .. ? Or are you illustrating an historic recipe form, which can sometimes be tricky in the execution :-) Actually, I have a couple not unlike this of my grandmother's, and they mostly come out very well, though I did discover that her wedding cake recipe included liquid only as an addendum, and an inaccurate one at that! lol! This looks like a perfectly good recipe (though maybe quite a lot of suet?), and I might use it to christen my departed aunt's antique pudding basins, which my uncle has just most kindly sent to me. If I do it (my list has become alarmingly
  5. You could be right. It was a science fair experiment from a long time ago. After "thawing," the fish lived about two minutes (during which he seemed completely drunk). I've been doing some searches on cryonics, and most suggest that goldfish can't, in fact survive freezing. But according to many sources, including this one, some fish and small animals can: "Viruses, bacteria, sperm/eggs, embryos at early stages of development, insects, and even small animals (small frogs, some fish) can be cryogenically frozen, preserved for an indefinite time (as long as low temperature is maintained) and the
  6. Hmm ... hadn't thought of those, but I don't know why it wouldn't, though they would be *very* small .. but I do have one rather small pudding basin, I don't know what it's capacity is but it's no bigger than a pint, and maybe smaller. I haven't seen it in a while, and I hope it hasn't got broken. One of my antiques :-) So perhaps half pint widemouths would work. I don't think I'd risk the very tiny ones, that would probably make nice little single portions .. though once you know your recipe works in a more conventional size, it might be a neat experiment. But someone upthread did say they u
  7. Oh no! The link is broken!!! Can you reup it? tia ...
  8. But I've got a stash of suet, and I'd like to make some for next year. Apart from the suet, the other obstacle to the project is a shortage of pudding basins .. anybody know where I can get small ones, short of importing them from the UK? Lehman's and Amazon both list larger ones, but it would be silly for me to make big puddings, because there are only 3 of us and my recipe is very rich, and those I plan to gift are also small households. If you know of functional substitutes for pudding basins, I'll entertain those ideas too. I even hear that people are doing steamed puddings in the microw
  9. Will have to see if I can find this - though onions are kind of SOP for any slicing gadget you happen to have running aren't they? Not sure about using them as pasta .. I have found that the options are a little different with slicers which have smooth blades. I haven't arrived at a conclusion yet as to whether smooth is better than serrated, but they are different.
  10. I don't know about the sous vide, but I've worn out 2 food savers, and wouldn't be without one. I vacuum pack not only what I freeze (including soup, stock, sauces) but also cold cuts, bacon, cheese ... it seals jars (NOT, as they say, a substitute for heat packing) and their vacuum containers are pretty nice. It also cuts the time it takes to marinate things if you have the shallow, square container .. I'd say go for it! Make sure it has a separate 'instant seal' button, and a port for the jar sealer thingies .. that is, go for a medium to high end model. ← Hawthorne, good old Santa is p
  11. Hawthorne

    Baking 101

    Ahhhh, a couple things I see now that you wrote that. 1. Don't use a non-stick pan for baking a sponge cake. And don't butter and flour the pan either. (you'd have been better to change pans if you didn't have any parchement and choose a pan you could de-pan it from.......like a two piece ring mold.....) 2. It needs to cling to the sides of the pan as it rises in the oven and while it cools. ← Has anybody besides me noticed how much harder it is becoming to find plain, not non-stick baking pans? I did finally find a source, and if I'm not the only one who hates non-stick for almost every
  12. Hawthorne

    Baking 101

    The only problem is that more gluten makes the dough a PITA to shape, at least if you're trying to make the dough really thin. ← Somewhere here there is a pizza dough thread, which turned me on to pizzamaking, where I discovered that if you put the dough in the fridge for 24 hours, even pizza dough made with bread flour can be turned into pizza without a major fight! Yes! At last - pizza independence! If you can remember to make the dough 24 hours in advance :-)
  13. Hawthorne

    Baking 101

    Save those egg whites -- they'll last for 6 months. You can make angel food cake or buttercream from them. That's what I usually do with mine. There is also a thread on using extra eggs / yolks / whites Here for some other ideas for the parts of a whole. I'm not a baking dumbass, more a new professional. And, the stuff I see others out there posting, professionals or not, shows me that I have a whole h*ll of a lot to learn still. Ask, and someone will help! ← I'm not a total dumbass, just a semi-dumbass .. but you've answered one of my questions already; now that I know those egg whi
  14. I don't know about the sous vide, but I've worn out 2 food savers, and wouldn't be without one. I vacuum pack not only what I freeze (including soup, stock, sauces) but also cold cuts, bacon, cheese ... it seals jars (NOT, as they say, a substitute for heat packing) and their vacuum containers are pretty nice. It also cuts the time it takes to marinate things if you have the shallow, square container .. I'd say go for it! Make sure it has a separate 'instant seal' button, and a port for the jar sealer thingies .. that is, go for a medium to high end model.
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