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OnigiriFB

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Posts posted by OnigiriFB

  1. LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

    To each his own  :raz:

    What's the problem?

    I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

    I wouldn't know, I'm still waiting for my granite mortar and pestle to arrive. Being in the food biz, appearance is important to me as well. I can't say I won't experiment with this though. :raz:

    Onigiri and I worked this one out offline. Hitting it with lime at the end won't curdle things, so don't worry.

    But I still figure the dish (as I've done it) looks ugly enough that some more disfigurement would hardly hurt.

    :biggrin:

    Yup! Mai ben rai khon bha (sorry sorry but er ya kinda are teasing teasing :P) sai manaow nai gaeng curry! Wierdo! :rolleyes::laugh:

  2. LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

    To each his own  :raz:

    What's the problem?

    I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

    lime juice is quite commonly added to certain gaeng 'curries' in Thailand...don't worry OnigiriFB, it won't curdle yr dish :wink:

    REALLY!!??? I didn't know that? Um, like the central region? Isaan region? The southern? Or the Northern? I can see Isaan, southern, and northern. I can't think of anything in the central. They use tamarind but not lime to my knowledge.

    :wub: I love that this thread is getting more and more post! I've been trying to get a Thai friend interested in egullet just to up this thread more and more. :smile:

  3. LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle*  :huh:  :blink:

    To each his own  :raz:

    What's the problem?

    I'm used to coconut based curries and the addition of lime would curdle it wouldn't it? Make it look like off milk? *shudder* I think tastewise it might be good. Just concerned about appereance. Vain of me I know. :rolleyes::laugh:

  4. Shhhh! That's kinda a restaurant trick! Don't tell the world. Um.. well ok they toss it a lot of oil in the wok really really really quickly. You'd be surprised how much oil a "authentic" asian restaurant goes thru. I used to have to tell my dad to watch out or if I did myself in the kitchen (at age 5 so yes I had a lot of supervision usually one of the other cooks) I would almost always get splattered. Ouch!

    Geez, and I was afraid to mention that "tip" because I thought that the real cooks here would blast me for "cheating"! :laugh:

    I started adding a bit of oil to the noodles before putting them in the wok because otherwise, I had to add so much oil to them in the wok that I was swapping gloppy noodles for greasy noodles. :angry: I find that I use much less oil overall if I add some oil to the noodles and toss before adding to the wok.

    hahahhahah my dad would shoot me for giving away a trade secret! Um.. hrm I'll have to try that trick cause I use too much oil from growing up in a restaurant and it doesnt agree with the tum tum after gallbladder surgery in April. :rolleyes::huh::blink:

  5. In addition to all the great tips mentioned upthread, one thing that I have to be careful about is not over-loading the wok (or pan).  I usually divide the noodles into 2 batches and cook them separately.  If your wok is super hot, your second batch should be done before the first batch gets cold.

    Also, if I'm wokking particularly sticky noodles, I toss them with a bit of oil before adding them to the wok.  Probably not an authentic technique, but it will definitely prevent your noodles from sticking together!

    Shhhh! That's kinda a restaurant trick! Don't tell the world. Um.. well ok they toss it a lot of oil in the wok really really really quickly. You'd be surprised how much oil a "authentic" asian restaurant goes thru. I used to have to tell my dad to watch out or if I did myself in the kitchen (at age 5 so yes I had a lot of supervision usually one of the other cooks) I would almost always get splattered. Ouch!

  6. Huh not familiar with Laotian food, like the real Luang Prabang stuff but I can see that. I guess without the coconut milk base that it wouldn't curdle. Um, I noticed you did not apologize for pustules! *shudder* I don't even like typing that I copy and pasted last time  :hmmm:

    I figured the less I said about it, the better off you would be :raz:

    LOL! No no no didn't a Thai lady teach you that you must always apologize even if it's not your fault? Now say after me Koah Toad Krup

  7. Huh not familiar with Laotian food, like the real Luang Prabang stuff but I can see that. I guess without the coconut milk base that it wouldn't curdle. Um, I noticed you did not apologize for pustules! *shudder* I don't even like typing that I copy and pasted last time :hmmm:

  8. I am highly offended by this word: pustules *throws up in mouth a little* Dude I thought the picture looks yummy. That word makes me wanna awk (throw up)!

    Um... never thought of a cheese grater for palm sugar. I usually just shave it with a sharp knife? (Another trick us women do to make only one dirty pot and one dirty knife. It's something woman learn from having to clean up after dirty men and boys so we learn that when WE do something we need to be neat.)

    LIME????? In curry??????? *boggle* :huh::blink:

    To each his own :raz:

  9. While the Gfron sleeps, all of the stir fryers come out apparently!

    On last night's recipe I used buckwheat soba.  I've used a wide range of rice noodles (I own an international grocery so I have a good variety to play with, but its unfortunate that of the many cuisines we carry, the entire slew of Asian foods is our one culinary knowledge gap).

    I do think these basics - overcooked noodles (I've never done dry noodles in stir fry), not high enough heat may be our culprits.  I also just recently started soaking instead of boiling my noodles, and in conjunction with tips I picked up in the pad thai cook-off, I have had a few kinda successes.

    Are you trying to make yakisoba? Yakisoba uses a different type of noodle Hiroyuki or the Japan forum should be able to help with that one. Buckwheat soba noodles are used mostly in a broth or a cold noodle dish as far as I know. Also do you know the trick to cooking buckwheat soba noodles? Kristen taught me. See thread in Japan forum. Good luck. Happy stir frying (only one egullet :P). Um, if you are using DRY rice noodles then soaking in lukewarm water is recommended. The only thing I don't like is sometimes even I make it and it comes out glue-y. If it's fresh I love lad nha, using large rice noodles. Usually they are sold here in the State refrigerated so they are hard. Then I will make sure to have HIGH heat and seperate them a little in some lukewarm water before stir frying. The only problem then is that they are TOO wet. You have to be careful of that too. But only if using fresh IMHO. :)

  10. Awww nothing wrong with brown UNDIGESTED food. :P

    :laugh::laugh::laugh:

    Peter, I would love to see your experiments, however brown.

    gallery_22892_3828_49160.jpg

    I dunno, this looks pretty close to Onigiri's description of what can be "wrong".

    The long strands are fermented bamboo, and the big chunky bits used to be chicken meat. Oh, and there was a big handful of fresh basil, some of which manages to give a glimmer of spectral diversity.

    A nice smoky, burnt flavour, but it's just not pretty. (Maybe some red food dye?)

    Looks good to me. I bet the smokey flavor is great! Did you add a little sugar to meld the flavors better? I bet with good fish sauce and all the curry paste it was mighty tasty. Sugar though if you didn't bother with it. Best if it's palm sugar then you'll get the caramel type sweet as opposed to the staight sweet of regular sugar. The caramel will meld with the smokey flavor and create a front taste that should meld on your tongue into the salty smokey bitter taste that makes a good curry GREAT! (ok I feel like Tony the Tiger :P)

  11. Tongs, high heat, lots of oil or water amazingly enough, try not to use too limp of noodles, cold or harder noodles work better, seperate the noodles from the rest of the stuff, add the sauce to both, add more sauce to the noodles AT THE END of stir-frying, stir fry shorter periods of time which will be easier with higher heat... see where I"m going? :P

    I have grown up with woks and spatulas in a restaurant kitchen with lots of BTUs. I can not stir fry worth anything without tongs. :P

  12. Something different......

    I've been playing lately with ideas from the Lao or lam, and roasting my eggplants and chillis, and then grinding the roasted veggies down and adding it into the curry. 

    It really chunks it up nicely, and gives that Luang Prabang smokiness.  You don't get the smooth coconut delivery of a central plains Thai, and it's not the coconut free clean of the North, but it does make for an interesting combination of texture and taste (I'm a sucker for coconut).

    However, it isn't pretty.  So we won't worry about pictures of "brown" food.

    Awww nothing wrong with brown UNDIGESTED food. :P

  13. The only thing I want to comment on is that African nations also eat rice but I believe in some areas the main source of carbs are some kind of tubar that is pounded into a sticky paste like thing. This is eaten with watery stews that may or may not be spicy. I think they take a lot of influence from India, Southern Europe, and the Middle East depending on what part of Africa you are in. I think the bushman rarely eat carbs most of their food source is protein based. See Anthony Bourdain's Namibia and Ghana trip (shudders at the shit poop eating part yuck no thanks but I would have done the same and then thrown up discreetly and gotten a ton of shots and antibiotics when I got back to the US. I think he did actually have to do that after that shoot.)

    Oh and something I learned from Amy of the Japan board. I now add barley (hulled and cleaned and white whatevered) to my Japanese short grain Nishiki rice. I LOVE sticky rice and also buy Jasmine by the 10 lb bag. I usually get the one with the nang angel on the front? Don't know name sorry. I transfer my rice to large tupperware when I get home. I will have to try the garlic trick. Thanks a bunch for that one!

    :)

  14. Another dinner from Thai Food:

    Soup of minced pork, scallions, and shiitake mushrooms. The soup base was chicken stock, soy sauce, and a pinch of sugar. We added ground pork, sliced scallions, and shiitake mushrooms, and finished the soup with cilantro and white pepper. The bowl is a little empty because the family nearly finished the soup before I sat down. :biggrin:

    gallery_42956_2536_11669.jpg

    Mom Leaung Neuang’s famous satay: strip steak marinated with coconut cream, turmeric, sweetened condensed milk, fish sauce, bourbon, and a paste of shallots and roasted peanuts, cumin, and coriander seed. We sprinkled on the excess marinade while the satay was on the grill. This was one of my favorite satays ever.

    Coconut crab salad (“mock frog salad”): Thai basil, sliced shallots and lemongrass, with shredded chiles, Thai lime leaves, and long-leaf coriander. We warmed cooked crab meat with coconut cream, palm sugar, fish sauce, and lime juice, mixed everything together, and topped the salad with ground roasted peanuts.

    Cucumbers and jasmine rice to round out the meal.

    gallery_42956_2536_29351.jpg

    *drooooooooool* Can I come to dinner? I'll make something!!!!!!!!!!!

  15. *jaw drops* is Hainese(sp?) rice popular in Japanese that they have a restaurant dedicated to it? Also I think it's pretty similar to khao mun gai in Thailand. Um, but different sauce. Wow, if that is so. I really really miss khao mun gai I used to eat it for lunch for weeks on end (can you so holy hips? I was a teenager though) and then get sick of so lay off it for 2 weeks before coming back to it. I can honestly say that it's my favorite lunch dish from Thailand and I wish I wish I could make it at home like the stall lady in front of my soi did. :)

  16. Hi,

    The recipe I use is from "just hungry" website. She does not use dashi. When I tried to modify her recipe and include dashi thinking the tamago would be less.. um fattening? oily? salty? my tamago yaki fell apart. I ended up with scrambled eggs. It turned out ok cause I used a "lunch in a box" website trick and turned it into mock tamagoyaki. But I want to know what I did wrong? Or how I can modify it? Thankee thankee

  17. Jason,

    I'm just curious and this OT but are you in Seattle or in Japan? Is Hiromi on vacation or something. It so cool to talk to people half way across the world. That's why I ask. Feel free to ignore me if you want no hard feelings if you do. Thanks :)

  18. rofl johnnyh. Me too and I'm a girl. Maybe they were part of the bar? Like I know salaryman often go to bars where the woman there are hostesses? There's a female version I've always wanted to try too. If it was the former then the expectation is you pay everything and the girls actually get a cut if you buy more alcohol. :)

  19. My preferred saute for mushrooms is soy and balsamic , with a tab of butter melted into the juices and reduced a bit  :-) Makes me a happy bunny indeed.

    my 2c

    jorge

    Soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, and butter? Hrm.. could you describe the taste? Is it sourish? I can't picture it. Um.. sounds good though I might have to pick up some shrooms! :)

  20. OMG OMG OMG! If I ever make it big I want to go there so bad! Those ayu... i'm at a lost for words (which is bad for a writer!). I want to get published and if I do I'm coming to Japan and going to this restaurant. You will ahve to come with me Rona, I'll pay! Maybe we can convince Peter to jaunt around and come too! :P

    Don't worry, I would gladly pay my own way to eat there again! You've got a limited time if you want me to join you, though. I'm only here till March 2010!

    docsconz and Prawncrackers--you really do have to try RyuGin (I just realized they write it with an uppercase "G"). There are other places in Tokyo I'd like to try (I actually tried to get a reservation at Aronia de Takazawa, but they only seat about 8 people a night, and only in parties of two or three, so no solo diners :sad:), but I would most definitely dine at RyuGin again. And I don't say that of very many high-end restaurants.

    If there are any professional chefs planning to be in Japan, RyuGin does accept stagieres from abroad. You can even request a stage on their website.

    Wha??? Where are you jaunting off to in 2010 if I may ask? Middle east? I have to say the middle east facinates me culturally etc but doubt I could live there... it's all in the food man. I realize every where I want to go or live is because the FOOD. If that doesnt make me a lifelong egulleter I don't know what will? :raz:

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