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Schielke

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Posts posted by Schielke

  1. First off, pardon my spelling of Seschuan. I could be right, I could be wrong.

    Old Seschuan Restaruant

    I had a really great experience at this place on Sunday. A friend of mine took me here to try out some really great Seschuan cusine. His parents routinely go there to get authentic Chinese cuisine. I have finally found a Chinese restaruant where I was impressed all around by the quality of the food.

    Besides the food, one of the best parts of this place is the location. It is directly across the street from Bahn Mi 88, so you can get some sandwiches for later after you eat! Or go check out Viet Wah. The sign does not say Old Seschuan Restaruant as it is listed in City Search, instead it says something like Chinese Seschuan Restaruant or Seschuan Chinese Restaurant. It is in the strip mall on the North-West corner of 12th and Jackson.

    We had:

    Special Spicy Beef Noodle

    Udon (that's right Japanese Udon noodles) noodles fried with slices of beef in a spicy sauce. This dish had the texture down perfect. The Udon noodles are critical, they are just chewy enough and hold up well to the frying. I highly reccommend this one...esp at 4.95 an order.

    Mongolian Beef

    The Mongolian Beef was not the standard slimy, sweet, spicy beef with whole chili peppers and fried rice noodles. It was slices of beef and green onion in a rich sauce that had a very nice depth to it's sweetness. The beef was well cooked too, the texture was dead on.

    Dried, Cooked String Beans

    This dish is made with string beans that they dry somehow (I think they may hang them or something) until they are just starting to wrinkle on the skin. If anybody knows how to do this, please let me know. This seems to concentrate the bean flavor. The beans are then stir fried with garlic and plenty of Seschuan pepper flakes. This dish is a must get. Very very good.

    One of the best things about this place is the ability to control the texture of the food. IMO, this is where most chinese places fall flat on their faces. Usually by taking shortcuts with cornstarch slurries and the like. Every single item had a lovely texture to it, perfectly suited for the dish. The beans were nicely cooked, yet still had a snap to the skin, which worked very well with the light saucing in the dish. To top all of this off, everything was cheap! Three of us got out of there for under $25 after tax and a generous tip!

    I am going back soon.

    Ben

  2. My favorite thing to do was to cut a few slices off the roll and fry them up. (you need to make a few cuts perpinducular to the edges so they dont curl into a bowl shape)

    I would then place the pork roll on a piece of bread and then top with some sharp cheddar cheese, some durkee's sandwich spread (worth discussing in another thread) and then another piece of bread. This was then toasted in the oven so the cheese was just starting to melt.

    Drool...

    Ben

  3. I had the pleasure of receiving a bottle of Lemon Hart rum for a housewarming present a couple months ago. After the party, I was closely looking at the bottle and realized that it was a 151 proof rum. I had been affraid to drink it for a while due to my previous experience with 151 proof rum (Bacardi) being akin to drinking fire ants.

    I worked up the mustard to try some on the rocks the other night and was astounded at how smooth and flavorful it was. Is this common of other decent high proof rums? Also, I was curious about your thoughts on Lemon Hart or any other info about it.

    Thanks!

    Ben

    (Jason, this is the rum I was talking about at the Pot Luck)

  4. I am still a bit wierded out by odd cold dishes. I think it is due to my fear of cold salads that I was forced against my will to eat at things like church picnics. I do, however love salami and cured meats of that nature.

    I love foie gras, but have only had it in hot preperations. I have yet to sample any kind of pate...hold me, I am affraid! hehehe.

    I think I will just bite the bullet and go for it.

    Ben

  5. I have to add Agua Verde for pretty much everything they have to offer. A few favorites though-

    Mangodilla (~$7.00 and feeds two people)

    Any of their tacos (~$7.00)

    Bitchin Margiritas ($4-$5 and use very good well liquor, sauza if I recall)

    They also have some black bean cakes that I really like and could barely eat all of, leftovers anyone?

    Ben

    Edit: cant spell.

  6. MsRamsey- I have been thinking about this too. I will give him a call in the near future to see what he has to say. Once I get some details about it, Ill post a thread to figure out a date and topic and such.

    I would have done this sooner, but funds were a bit tight and I wanted to wait a little. :biggrin:

    Heyjude- That would be cool and I would love to go.

    Ben

  7. I am all about adding some kind of cola to the mix. I generally perfer Coca-Cola Classic due to it's balanced sweetness. I cant remember my bbq sauce recipe that I use right now, but Ill try to post it later when I can look it up. A main component is cola though.

    Ben

  8. So that Omakase menu you just described was $158 total? Good Effing Lord.

    I really really need to go.

    So do you just ask the sushi chef for an omakase at a certain price point? Will that generally include things such as the little crabs or do you have to ask for it?

    I am getting a sushi hankering.

    Ben

  9. I finally ate at Le Pichet this last weekend. I had a great time, but I still really have not truly eaten there.

    A friend and I had good intentions of making it from Tini Bigs (where we paid too much for decent drinks) to Capitol Hill for a good night of Cap Hill bar hopping. We figured that we should stop somewhere on the way for another round of drinks. Realizing I was in Belltown on first, I steered our path to coincide with Le Pichet. We sat at the bar and asked the jovial bartender what the beer situation was. He repied that he had bottles of Red Chimay and a nice Alsacean (spelling) pale ale in a big bottle. Being fresh out of college, we chose the big bottle. I was already a bit clouded so I dont remember the name of the beer, but it was excelent and the whole bottle was $12! Lightly hopped, smooth and somewhat crisp is what I remember. My companion was also impressed.

    Soon I realized that I was in Le Pichet and that I was not eating anything. I fixed this quandry by ordering a little snacking food. We had the Baguette with butter and the roasted almonds with coarse sea salt. The Baguette was a little more rustic than I was expecting, but still very tasty. The almonds were very nice as well. Not too salty and very flavorful, it was just what I needed.

    After polishing of the beer and stumbling off of our stools, we left happy and still on our way to Capitol Hill. Tragedy soon struck...we got some crazy idea in our heads that stopping at the Night Light and getting a Long Island Iced Tea was a really good idea. I was about a third finished with mine and realized that drinking any more would be a very bad thing. My companion, who has the tolerance of an elephant, polished his off, but soon lost his navigational ability.

    New Rule for Ben- Night Light Long Islands should either be avoided or only consumed as a first drink of the evening.

    After giving up on our Long Islands, we got a call from Katie, who we were supposed to be meeting on the Hill after she got out of the Bob Dylan concert. Aparently, Bob had no opening band and the show was over in time for the geezer to get to bed by 10...weak. We then walked to the Lava lounge to watch some shuffleboard while waited for Katie. Aparently the lava lounge shuffleboard scene is off the hook! We were on our way out when it started to get wild and the participants took their shirts off.

    So we didn't make it to Capitol Hill, but in every other sense our evening was a success. In any case, I will be returning to Le Pichet in the near future for a real meal. I cant wait!

    Ben

  10. He also said that Salumi (owned by the parent of his 'good, good friend' Mario) was the first place to make sausage in Seattle, which couldn't possibly be true. I had FoodTV on while I was baking babas for the potluck. Seemed like the usual Pike Place Market tourist puff piece. Nothing on any local restaurants other than Vivace - which he called Vivace's (It always makes me cringe when people put an extra 's' a the end of a name).

    At least he recognized some bitchin' coffee.

    Ben

  11. I just checked out that link to trotter's vegetable menu and they had this to say.

    "This multi-course tasting menu is a celebration of modern vegetable cuisine. Chef Trotter’s approach to vegetable cuisine is not that of a staunch vegetarian, but rather of a chef passionate about vegetables. Their complex textures, artistic shapes, vibrant colors and full flavors fuel his love for transforming them into unforgettable dishes. "

    Ben

  12. I also have an old sword that I guess he will sharpen too. sweet.

    I guess Ben hasn't seen those segments on the Antiques Roadshow where the expert meets the hopeful owner of some old sword he has been using as a doorstop for twenty years:

    Expert: "Well, this is a fine specimen of an 1861 Southern cavalry sabre, used by the 3rd regiment, second division of Col. Bartholemew Jeremia Coburn's Army of the Housatonic. Very, very rare, there are just two known to have survived with the beveled hilt and engraved blood channel. Do you have any idea what it is worth?"

    Hopeful and slightly dazed owner: "Well no, not really. But a neighbor told me it looked old and might be worth a pretty penny."

    Expert: "Well, in it's original condition a sword like this fetched $475,000 at auction last year. But unfortunately you've had this sword sharpened and cleaned, and that reduces its value to a collector to about $11.99."

    Owner faints.

    :laugh::laugh:

    Hehehe, sweet.

    The sword I found in my grandfather's office after he passed away some years back. It is an old samuri style sword that looks like it was from WWII.

    Part of the handle is broken (I guess the bolster, unless it has another name) and the blade is quite dirty. It doesnt have any kind of ornaments on it, it seems pretty utilitarian.

    Any guesses?

    Ben

    Check out the following site

    http://www.samuraisword.com/

    They have a section called evaluation, that helps you find out what type of sword you have and whether or not it is worth anything.

    My husband has a couple os Japanese swords that I have also been thinking about getting appraised.

    Neato, Ill have to check it out tonight!

    Thanks,

    Ben

  13. I also have an old sword that I guess he will sharpen too. sweet.

    I guess Ben hasn't seen those segments on the Antiques Roadshow where the expert meets the hopeful owner of some old sword he has been using as a doorstop for twenty years:

    Expert: "Well, this is a fine specimen of an 1861 Southern cavalry sabre, used by the 3rd regiment, second division of Col. Bartholemew Jeremia Coburn's Army of the Housatonic. Very, very rare, there are just two known to have survived with the beveled hilt and engraved blood channel. Do you have any idea what it is worth?"

    Hopeful and slightly dazed owner: "Well no, not really. But a neighbor told me it looked old and might be worth a pretty penny."

    Expert: "Well, in it's original condition a sword like this fetched $475,000 at auction last year. But unfortunately you've had this sword sharpened and cleaned, and that reduces its value to a collector to about $11.99."

    Owner faints.

    :laugh::laugh:

    Hehehe, sweet.

    The sword I found in my grandfather's office after he passed away some years back. It is an old samuri style sword that looks like it was from WWII.

    Part of the handle is broken (I guess the bolster, unless it has another name) and the blade is quite dirty. It doesnt have any kind of ornaments on it, it seems pretty utilitarian.

    Any guesses?

    Ben

  14. Katie and I went with a friend last night. Wheeeee.

    Good times had by all.

    We had:

    Pizza with chorizo and green olives- I am starting to appreciate olives more and more. This pizza is one reason why. The crust is just so damn good. I do think it needs a tiny bit more chorizo though.

    Steak Frites with Cabrales butter- The frites were really really good. It has been so long since I have had a really good example of fried food. Go Brasa. The steak was pretty good, nothing exceptional. For the price it was amazing though. :raz:

    Lamb burger- The lamb burger was very nice, I would have wished it has more of a lamb flavor. Perhaps some cumin in the meat would bring it out. Still very nice and one of the better burgers I have had.

    Brasa Sundae- Served with long spoons in a tall narrow cup. Tasty ice cream layered with traces of caramel, strawberries, and some kind of chocolate cake. I felt like a winner after eating it. Yeah!

    I had a better look at the drink list and am now not so angry about it. The Chimay beer was listed at 7.50, which is still outrageous. Other beers were 4.00 a pint, which is still pretty pricecy, but not crazy.

    Specality drinks run between 7.00 and 8.00, which is not too bad either. We tried out a few of them with good results. Katie had a Belini, which was quite tasty (Champagne and Peaches is what it said on the menu). Ian our friend had a Tradewinds, which is like a mojito with huckleberry reduction. Excelent drink. I had a Negroni, I have been meaning to try it for a while somehwere. It is campari, gin, and vermouth. Very dry, but very flavorful.

    We saved 20 bucks on the food bill, but made up for it in drinks. hehehe. I need to stop drinking to stay in budget! :raz:

    Ben

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