Jump to content

trufflelover

participating member
  • Content Count

    25
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.travelingmcmahans.com/index.htm

Profile Information

  • Location
    Louisville KY
  1. I stopped eating meat (aside from fish/seafood) before my first trip to France, so on the half-dozen-plus trips I've taken, I've yet to taste a bite of meat. I've recently reintroduced some meats into my diet, and will be spending two days in Paris following two weeks studying in Gascony. I've never sought out vegetarian restaurants (in fact, the opposite), but did look for veggie-friendly places. Now that the whole world of French cuisine is open, I'd love suggestions for places to eat in Paris(I'll be alone) in the 35 euro range. Some of my favorites in the past have included L'Epi Dupin, the fixed price menu at Flora, Pulcinella and Chez Michel (in the 10th). I'll never be the type that orders a meat-lovers' anything, but I'm very curious about experiencing this new aspect of French food.
  2. I'm so excited to have applied for and received a two-week culinary writing residency at Kitchet-at-Camont, a culinary center run by Kate Hill in rural southwest France. My first week I'll participate in a regularly scheduled program -- Camp Confit. My second week is entirely up to me in terms of what to do, where to visit, what to learn to cook. It's an embarrassment of riches -- with France before me, how to I begin to narrow it down? On one of the 7 days Kate and I will visit le Marché aux Truffes de Lalbenque, and if I can scrape up enough euros, maybe even purchase some for for dinner that night. Other than this I have a week wide open to plan a program that will help me learn about the cuisine of southwestern France. Aside from simply learning some cooking techniques, my primary focus will be the connection people have with their food - with farms, food artisans, butchers, etc. I would love suggestions for either particular dishes to study (foie, pate, cassoulet and confit are covered the first week), or excursions/experiences to work into the time. It's my first time to this region of France. Thanks!
  3. My next pickup is tonight. Here's what we're getting: Squash Lettuce Radishes Broccoli Cauliflower Parsley Kale I leave town tomorrow so I only get one meal from this mix. Ideas on one great meat-free dinner with at least two of these ingredients? (I have orzo, assorted pasta, brown rice, and assorted cheeses and oils on hand, as well as a few fresh herbs) THanks!
  4. They were easy - just tear the greens into chip-sized sections, brush with olive oil and sea salt, and pop in the oven (I used the toaster oven so I didn't heat up the house) for about 7 minutes, turning halfway. A couple burned but the rest were crispy and good.
  5. Thanks everyone for the good suggestions, especially the books. I made kale chips last night to go with a sandwich, and am thinking either stir fry or some udon noddles tonight to use the napa cabbage and broccoli.
  6. For a while now, my husband and I have planned our menus a (work) week at a time. On weekends we flip through our books and magazines and browse online to settle on five dinners to make that week. Then in one afternoon we pick up what we need all week. That worked well for making weeknight dinners stress-free, and helped us budget for groceries. That's out the window now that our (first) CSA farm share has started. We'll pick up our produce (and fruit and herbs) on Thursday and will need to plan our next few meals around whatever we receive. I need to be able to roll with whatever we get, which means I'll need a better-stocked pantry. What do you recommend we keep on hand to be able to whip up something great with whatever we happen to bring home on Thursdays? (Neither of us eat most meat, so meals will be veg, grain or fish-centered) Thank you! (Here's part of our first week's basket)
  7. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    ooh, yeah the pesto went on at the end
  8. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    ms foodie - love the look of the smoked salmon with creme fraiche on fried fingerling potatoes!
  9. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    Beautiful garnishes, chef Bradley! I have been reading Markets of Provence in preparation for my upcoming trip, and was inspired by the Provencal soupe au pistou. This version has butternut squash in addition to the green and white beans, carrots, potatoes, tomatoes, onions, zucchini and pasta. And for dessert a dangerously good chocolate cake with vanilla icing dusted with Saigon cinnamon.
  10. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    That shrimp looks amazing! I had leftover Calvados cream sauce from my scallops last night -- didn't want to waste it so I stretched it and had Penne in a Calvados + thyme cream sauce with sauteed shrimp, appley artichokes and wilted spinach (plus a few pine nuts and some mozzarella).
  11. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    Thank you! Can't wait to try it
  12. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    Percyn -- would you share the 'fennel and pear take on the Waldorf' recipe? I am a newly converted fennel fan and am always looking for yummy things to do with it. The salad looks fabulous!
  13. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    Shaya - love the raviolis! Shoutsandmurmurs - beautiful salad photo! We had a belated Valentine's dinner ... Butternut squash + apple soup, Seared scallops on spinach with a Calvados cream sauce, and Goat cheese + thyme mashed potatoes.
  14. trufflelover

    Dinner! 2007

    Tonight we made pan seared scallops with butternut squash risotto with a truffled sage + brown butter sauce.
  15. Thanks! I didn't have onion soup - they served vegetable soup, red wine, bread, a meat plate and cheeses. I don't actually eat most meat and at 9 a.m. I couldn't bring myself to drink the wine so I had a nice bread and cheese plate I haven't written the article yet but it's in the works. I'm trying to think of a more interesting angle than just "we went here, we saw this, blah blah blah ..." Was thinking of putting it in a bigger context with a little history of Les Halles. I'm submitting it to International Travel News. (They're pubishing a cooking class story of mine in February and are interested in a Rungis story.) I think any disappointment stems from the rushed manner we flew through the markets, and how little action was actually taking place. We spent more time having breakfast than we did touring the market and I didn't find the value equal to the cost. But then again it is a very unique experience so all in all I'm glad we did it.
×
×
  • Create New...