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Tuber magnatum

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  1. Tuber magnatum

    Smoking cheese

    OK, I know this is not really smoking, but I have had some good success with just smoking thinly sliced cheese under a glass dome and allowing it to sit a few minutes. Applewood seems to work best for cheese. I have found the hickory and mesquite a little overpowering. Admittedly it is more for show, but when you open the dome at the table and a waft of smoke pours out, it always brings a smile, and occasionally a cough from our guests. 😋
  2. Tuber magnatum

    Cryo-shucking Lobster

    Hello crustacean lovers! I have read and viewed videos on cryo-shucking oysters and reference to using the technique for other bivalves which makes sense. If not familiar, you basically drop oyster in Liquid Nitrogen for 15 seconds, remove and let rest 30 minutes. They will open up a bit allowing shell to be removed with out damage to shell or oyster. It is described in pod cast by Chef Anjana Shanker of the Modernist Cuisine Lab and in attached video. Partway through her description she comments on its use for lobster but doesn't describe the process. The closest instruction I have found is https://modernistcuisine.com/2014/07/cooking-for-ferran-adria-reflecting-on-inspiration-and-innovation/ but it isn't clear exactly how it is done. Drop whole lobster in N2? Just claw or tail? How then do you remove shell? Has any one tried this and how specifically do you do it? Thanks in advance!
  3. Tuber magnatum

    Precision induction: Tasty Onetop

    Yes I do. My first attempts at using it showed the that there was a discrepancy between the temperature showing on the app and with a Fluke thermometer. Fortunately it was consistent, ie precise but not accurate so I could compensate (Hopefully I remember the terminology correct from my schooling!). Like others, I wanted a "deep fryer" for outdoors. I just used it this weekend for fries, heated the oil to 400F in a cast iron pot with their temperature probe. I checked with Fluke and it worked well for me. It is relatively inexpensive so I wasn't expecting too much. My main complaint is the temperature probe which is too short and the holder which only allows the probe to be held in only one spot. If you don't have the correct height pot you cant adjust the probe so it is as correct depth. This should be an easy fix for them. Also the rubber holder doesn't hang on to the side of the pot well, especially if it has a lip. However, given the price, it has served its purpose well enough.
  4. Tuber magnatum

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Yes, I do have the flavour bible, an superb resource. I don't make use of it enough; excellent suggestion.
  5. Tuber magnatum

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Thank you for the ideas! I am assuming the vegetables were cooked, otherwise no reason to add additional crunch. You have given me some inspiration for my next go at it. I am thinking of adding some additional flavours to the kaolin mixture to complement the inside. Not sure exactly what at this point .... If you have suggestions I would welcome them.
  6. Tuber magnatum

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Very similar, but I think I may have used more lactose. An updated recipe which came with the kaolin I bought required more than what was listed in his original recipe in the Mugaritz cookbook. Would you repeat this, or was it a one off novelty? Curious about the raw white asparagus; it wasn't too bitter?
  7. Tuber magnatum

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Asparagus! That's an interesting idea. Would you be able to elaborate a bit? In the photo you show some sliced asparagus. Was it coated before slicing? I would have thought the kaolin would crumble off. Or did you slice before it hardened? Or maybe the slices were from an uncoated stalk and only the whole stalk was coated? Did you add any additional elements / sugar to the kaolin mixture to add some flavour in addition to the crunch element.
  8. Tuber magnatum

    Precision induction: Tasty Onetop

    Just received mine today and will test later. In meantime, came across this review which describes some of the issues discussed already: https://www.wired.com/review/tasty-one-top-smart-induction-cooktop/amp
  9. Tuber magnatum

    What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)

    I have been on the hunt for one of these. Thanks for the tip. Unfortunately when I go to their site I seem unable to find any. Would you have any other info?
  10. Tuber magnatum

    Edible helium balloon

    I wondered the same thing. My plan is to try with what ever methylcellulose I have lying around (I think f50 off the top of my head). Need to source a small canister of helium first. Will post results when I get around to it.
  11. Tuber magnatum

    Ideas for Kaolin / Agalita (edible clay)

    Recently I had the unforgettable experience of dining at Andoni Luis Adurizis’s restaurant, Mugaritz and had to buy one of his cookbooks, "Mugaritz". One of his many innovative recipes is “Edible Stones”. This makes use of kaolin, an edible clay sometimes sold as “Agalita”. A slurry is made using Agalita and Lactose to which is added food colouring. Boiled baby potatoes are skewered, dipped, and allowed to dry in the oven. They are served with real rocks to maximize what has been described as the culinary equivalent of trompe-l'œil. Guests of course are not to see the process or the skewered potatoes drying so as not to ruin the surprise. I have attached some pictures showing my results which, although visually not exactly like the real stones, were texturally and by weight, reasonably convincing. Now that I have served them at a dinner party, I am left with a large amount of Agalita! I am hoping there are some modernist chefs out there with more ideas for my remaining Kaolin.
  12. Tuber magnatum

    Edible helium balloon

    Thank you so much! You were correct, I couldn't view the video on their site outside of Australia, however I did find it on YouTube. Again thanks, I will try this recipe next.
  13. Tuber magnatum

    New to me cut of beef for sous vide

    Just by chance I am reading about cooking meat in Modernist Cuisine, Volume 3. Although probably overly simplistic, there are two important enzymes involved in breaking down collagen and proteins: Calpain and Cathepsin. Like all enzymes, their activity increases with heat up to the point that the heat starts to breakdown the enzyme itself. Calpain denatures at 40C / 105F. If you cook at a higher temperature this enzyme is deactivated and doesn't contribute to tenderization. Its maximal activity is just below this temperature. So the idea is cook for a period of time just below this temperature and then when it has done its job, raise and hold the temperature to maximize the activity of Cathepsin at just below 50C / 122F. Apparently this doesn't work for meats that are already tender which benefit from quick cooking as a general rule, or for poultry, pork, and other lighter coloured meats in which their enzymes are faster acting than in red meat. It would be overkill. Above 50 / 122, a different chemical reaction occurs, gelatinization of collagen. The third chemical reaction occurs which is contraction of collagen and protein which squeezes out water drying meat. This is noticeable above at 58C / 135F, and increases with temperature.
  14. Tuber magnatum

    New to me cut of beef for sous vide

    Did a google search and came up with these! Haven't watched them yet but will do at some point, so I cant vouch for them. Enjoy!
  15. Tuber magnatum

    Edible helium balloon

    One cubic meter helium can lift about 1kg or put another way, one cubic foot of helium lifts 28.2 gms, around an ounce. I rather suspect a balloon of bread would weigh way too much and presumably it would be porous. Wouldn't it be cool if you could float a pomme soufflee, but that too is way too heavy? So I am stuck looking for a taffy balloon recipe!
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