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Hopleaf

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  1. I just watched all 13 episodes on hulu and I found the show to be entertaining enough. nothing whatsoever like the book, but a decent enough show. ninety percent of what went on in the kitchen was complete farce. But I was constantly thinking that Bourdain is either doing a great job of keeping his mouth shut about what a debacle FOX made of his book or he's just enjoying cashing the check. At any rate, there's a show on hulu that I really enjoyed that the BBC put out called Whites. It also met the same fate as KC, but it was lightyears better. Check it out.
  2. Make that TWO questions!! So we actually need more bottles than the list provided before the class started? Six varietals of whites for Assignment #1? I'm confused.
  3. Just read through the introduction and before I get started on the tasting I came away with one question. You say on the one hand that wines should never overly smell of asparagus but on the other hand that this is a flavor one might pick up while tasting the wine. Actually you say "...wines should never have unusually "green" aromas like asparagus,..." Can you explain how one might taste something but not necessarily smell it?
  4. Hopleaf

    First Varietals

    That's good news. I'll try their Zin. I'm currently conducting an experiment (well, not this minute). I found two of their Pinot Noirs, Monterey and Carneros, and am trying to notice the difference between the two. Just attempting to refine the old tastebuds a bit. Not even sure if I'll notice a difference, but I'm hoping there's something. nothing like the wow factor of picking up on stuff like that.
  5. Hopleaf

    Origins

    As are the yeasts used to make the wines. ← There's a difference, winesonoma. The milk doesn't taste like anything close to what the cheeses end up tasting like after the yeast is added. you don't use specific milk for specific cheeses (well, ok, goat milk for goat cheese, but you see the same cow's milk for Cheddar, Stilton, Exploratoir [personal favorite of mine], etc.) I'm asking here if the grapes do taste like the finished products. Since the varietal plays such an important factor in how a wine tastes, it would seem there'd be more of a sensory relationship between the two. And actu
  6. Hopleaf

    Origins

    Mark was that a gewurtraminer winemaker that told ya that!? mrbigjas, big ups yo! Rebel Rose, that's a helluva response. thanks.
  7. Hopleaf

    Origins

    Not really, Keith, but only because the yeast strains introduced to the milk are what give cheeses unique flavors. So the analogy doesn't work. Specific grapes are used to make specific wine.
  8. Hopleaf

    Origins

    I've repeatedly fessed to being new to wine. I'm getting less and less new with ever sip. What I'm wondering about today is if I went out and got me a handful of grapes, say syrah just for the purposes of arguement, would they share any taste characteristics with the wine they would become? would this handful of syrah grapes taste like a syrah wine in any way? Is a syrah a syrah a syrha, que syrah? how many syrahs can a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could figure out a corkscrew? ...ahem...sorry. Anyway... I realize that a whole host of factors go into the process of making wine from grapes. f
  9. I know I kinda am. I really enjoyed the film, no doubt. but the more I hear about spikes in sales of Pinot Noir, the boom at the Hitching Post II, the outcry that Virginia Madsen didn't get the Oscar (puh-lease...she was good, but not THAT good) and that Thomas Haden Church's performance made me forget he cut his bones in Wings (he'll always be Lowell the mechanic to me). It's like Sideways has or is about to jump the shark (though no listing yet at www.jumptheshark.com).
  10. Hopleaf

    First Varietals

    sorry, didn't mean to pester. just geeked for the class. Anyway, I'm busy buying bottles for the er...lab materials. Funny that some of the bottles mentioned were echoed by my friendly neighborhood wine dudes. The Columbia Crest Merlot and the (can't remember the exact name) M'bosch Sauv.Blanc, both at very reasonable prices. And if I can make a recommendation of my own, Castle Rock has decent (to this novice) Pinot Noirs at a fair price point (around ten bucks in my neck of the woods (Chicago area).
  11. Hopleaf

    First Varietals

    Am I missing something or has this class just been delayed? I still don't exactly get how the courses work at the eGCI, so maybe I am just not getting it. And if I attend the class, will I have to change my handle to Grapevine? or do you allow reformed beer drinkers?
  12. That's a great post, Brad. I really enjoyed reading it and came away with more than a few new things. I wonder if you or someone could make some recommendations specific to a noobie on a budget. I typically look for new wines that are a decent introduction. I often spend a lot of time talking to the various knowledgable people selling these wines and take their recommendations to heart. I've gotten several gems that have helped me carve my tastes out a bit at this early stage in my wine development. Perhaps there are many of you that post here who are well beyond such an introdcutory stage but
  13. Hopleaf

    A little of this . . .

    ok, so sort of like how a shiraz has that nearly cloying weight to it but can at the same time show off noticeable berry flavors that aren't necessarily part of that sticky sweetness?
  14. Hopleaf

    A little of this . . .

    This might sound nitpicky or like I'm trying to be a troublemaker, but I'm curious what you see the difference, if any, is between "reticent" and "reluctant." Or is this simply a case of looking for the right word and not wanting to sound redundant? Plus, I wonder if you can expound upon how you're using these terms? Is a reticent or reluctant nose one that you find lacking? If so, is this in comparison to other wines? Is there a certain level of nose that you expect? Also, how could the bourgogne be "lightweight on the palate" and yet also have "intense cherry flavors" at the same time? I'm
  15. Ok, this wasn't a bottle, but for all intents and purposes it amounted to as much. I was in culinary school at Kendall College in Evanston, IL in my fine service class. There was a 17-top reservation, a wine tasting group headed by a poly sci prof from Northwestern. Our instructor asked who wanted the big table? I didn't even look up so much as raise my hand, but I guess that was everyone else's response as well. She gave it to me. Fine, no problem. Turned out it was a great table. Laying on my charm and staying on top of the flights was no problem. They were working through an assorted case
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