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Sony

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Posts posted by Sony

  1. A very, very long time ago (15+ years) I had a big bag of Cape Cod chips I think they were called "The Brown Ones".

    They were the chips that spent a little extra time in the fryer and were dark, flavorful, and so yummy that I still think of them to this day.

    Anybody know of another brand that sells their brown potato chips?

    Never had those. I'm a sucker for the extra-brown ones, so this is what I pick up when a craving hits:

    http://www.taquitos.net/snacks.php?snack_code=2511

    Though Utz is carried in stores around here, I haven't seen the dark variety since I moved to upstate NY, come to think of it.... Guess that makes them even more of a special treat if I ever do see 'em again!

  2. Variation on a Tomato Pie

    Serves 8 as Main Dish.

    This recipe is loosely adapted from Laurie Colwin's "Tomato" essay in More Home Cooking. My changes:

    -I made a single crust for the top instead of a double crust (because I don't like soggy pie crust)

    -I reduced the butter by about 25%

    -I added salt to the crust dough

    -I reduced the cheese and subbed a smaller amount of a lower-fat cheese (mozzarella) for cheddar

    -I used a reduced-fat mayo

    -I used lime juice instead of lemon because that's that I had on hand

    -I added leeks to the mix

    Perhaps one day I shall actually follow a recipe.....

    Preheat oven to 400' F.

    Quickly and lightly mix:

    3 TB COLD unsalted butter, cut in teeny pieces

    1 cup flour

    2 tsp baking powder

    1/2 tsp kosher salt (Morton's)

    1/2 cup milk (I used 1% milkfat. Add more by teaspoonfuls if necessary to make a slightly sticky dough)

    Roll into an 8-inch round.

    Thinly slice tomatoes-I used about 1 pound beefsteak tomatoes. Though I did not do this, I would suggest draining some of the "guts" from the tomatoes because they get awfully juicy when baked.

    I also had a leek kicking around in the fridge, so I sliced that up (about 1 cup raw) and sauteed it for addition in a little extra virgin olive oil (about 1/2 tsp).

    Assembly:

    -1/4 tsp of extra virgin olive oil in the bottom of an 8-inch nonstick cake pan.

    -Layer in sliced tomatoes.

    -Top with 4 thin layers mozzarella cheese (about 4 oz. total)- just plain part-skim. Would probably be great with good buffalo mozzarella.

    -Sprinkle on chopped fresh basil and oregano. (about 1 TB of each).

    -Evenly sprinkle with the cooked leeks.

    -Pour on 1/4 cup mayo (I used prepared reduced-fat mayo) mixed with the juice of 1/2 lime (about 3 TB)

    -Top with the crust and tuck lightly around the tomatoes.

    -Slash the top crust a few times.

    Place on a baking sheet (in case of any excess burbling) and bake for 20-30 minutes, until the crust is golden. Cool slightly before scooping out to serve.

    Keywords: Main Dish, Dinner, Breakfast, Vegetarian, Brunch, Lunch

    ( RG2022 )

  3. Cut them in half and slow roast them at low temp for 6-8 hrs with evoo, basil, and garlic.  We eat these on bageutte slices with or without basil/mozz, put them in salads, on pizzas, in sandwiches.

    When you blend these up with a little chicken or vegetable stock (or milk) and slowly heat through- best roasted tomato (or cream of tomato) soup ever..... :wub:

  4. Inspired by Laurie Colwin's Tomato essay, I made my 1st attempt at tomato pie. So delicious! With a handful of ingredients and a wee bit o' time, one of the most satisfying things emerged from the oven....I love it when that happens!

    My take was a little more like tomato cobbler than tomato pie, because I only made a top crust. So much liquid was exuded, I wondered how the bottom crust would

    bake...I can't imagine that it would bake as much as simmer like a savory dumpling (?) Maybe someone can speak to their experience.....would squeezing out the "guts" help without removing too much tomato goodness??

    Anyway here's my version:

    Preheat oven to 400' F.

    Quickly and lightly mix:

    3 TB COLD unsalted butter, cut in teeny pieces

    1 cup flour

    2 tsp baking powder

    1/2 tsp kosher salt

    1/2 cup milk

    Roll into an 8-inch round.

    Thinly slice tomatoes-I used about 1 pound beefsteak tomatoes. I also had a leek kicking around in the fridge, so I sliced that up and sauteed it for addition in a little extra virgin olive oil.

    Assembly:

    -Bit of extra virgin olive oil in the bottom of an 8-inch cake pan.

    -Layer in sliced tomatoes.

    -Top with 4 thin layers mozzarella cheese (about 4 oz. total)- just plain part-skim, not the good buffalo mozzarella.

    -Sprinkle on chopped fresh basil and oregano. (about 1 TB of each)

    -Pour on 1/4 cup mayo (I used prepared :shock: REDUCED-FAT :shock::shock: mayo :raz: ) mixed with the juice of 1/2 lime (about 3 TB).

    -Evenly sprinkle with the leeks.

    -Top with the crust and tuck around the edges.

    -Slash the top crust a few times.

    Place on a baking sheet (in case of any excess burbling) and bake for 20-30 minutes, until the crust is golden.

    Cool until you can't stand it and scoop up some juicy goodness for dinner.

    Apparently, this is supposed to be good leftover and re-heated the next day. We shall see :wink: .

  5. Does anyone else really, really love shrimp heads? I always steal shrimp heads off people's plates when they leave them behind. They have this musky, buttery, crunchy flavor that I can't entirely explain but adore.

    I may not do fish eyes (yet ) but shrimp heads? Heck yeah! Your description of shrimp heads is the best I've heard in a long time.....

    So, I have to ask- what is the fish eye really like in terms of taste and texture? If I wasn't already tuned into shrimp heads, hearing "musky butteriness" might convince me to get over my squeamishness...... :wink:

  6. well, I was a little unadventurous in this fish head round.....First I roasted the heads with simply salt and pepper, then picked off the cooked flesh (snacking on a lot of it along the way- YUM :biggrin: )

    The remaining mix of cod and salmon bits were mixed with an egg, mayonnaise, dry mustard, smoked paprika, Old Bay, and a dash of hot sauce and lime juice for fish cakes. The bones were simmered in separate batches with leek trimmings and celery for cod stock and salmon stock. Haven't decided quite what to do with the stocks, so will probably freeze until inspiration strikes.

    Anyway, I could NOT bring myself to even try the eye, or the "eye jelly".....I simply had a mental block. Wish someone else could have enjoyed it.... :wink:

  7. So, last night I became the recipient of:

    1 large salmon head and filleted tail portion (about 2 inches of body below the gills still there)

    1 large cod head (about 1 inch of body below the gills still there) and unfilleted tail portion

    The fishmonger at my local store (who is wonderful :wub: ) handed them to me with my order because he knows I like to use leftover filleted frames for stock. Both look quite fresh- clear eyes, bright red gills, but they do smell a tiny bit "fishy"....I suppose I can't expect them to smell the same as fillets :smile: .

    The thing is, I know that a lot of people eat the head, especially in curries, but I've never had fish head in my life. Thus, I think I would have a hard time winging it without measurements.....

    Could someone kindly post a recipe or 2 in Recipe Gullet or point me to the good rendition on the web? Preferably one that does not involve deep-frying or a cleaver? Other than that, I'm open to most any type of curry (Indian, Thai, etc.) There was one posted earlier upthread, but I'm afraid I don't know what a "pip" is.

    If not, I at least know that the cod can produce a nice stock, no? I'm thinking the salmon might be too strong for that application.....

    (Currently, they're a rather spooky sight in my fridge. I grew up seeing people remove the gills, so I removed them this morning and set the heads to soak in cold salted water. Good thing I'm not the blogger this week who is obligated to present a fridge shot :biggrin: ).

  8. Only problem, is that it really could use 2 hours in the refrigerator to keep the cheese congealed enought to the lavash.

    Hi newsbabe! I think that things can be done 2 hours ahead of time, and the idea sounds great! All of the wrap/sandwich/canape ideas sound good.....

    Merstar, maybe the smoked salmon spread for the canapes can also work as a dip for cucumber rounds and crackers? It would be great to pair that with an herbed cream cheese spread option for the vegetarians....

    Crouching tyler, what cheese do you suggest for date-stuffing?

    Prosciutto and cantaloupe.....classic, easy combo! And I'll have to check into prices of prepared antipasti around here, but that's a great call.....

    Boiled eggs are hopefully something that the prep person will become comfortable with, because deviled egg variations would be great to include!

    Oh yes! Chutney and cream cheese! Good call, hummingbirdkiss!

    Other ideas on the list:

    Layered Mediterranean dip (hummus, feta, chopped olives, sun-dried tomatoes, artichoke hearts, chopped parsley) with pita chips

    Cream cheese & Pickapeppa dip for cut vegetables

    Peanut butter and vanilla yogurt mixed as a fruit dip (sounds weird, tastes good :wink: )

    Soft goat cheese topped with ajvar for crackers

    Cream cheese mixed with blue cheese, chopped walnuts for pear/apple slices and crackers (maybe dried cranberries in the cheese mix?)

    Thanks so much again for your help so far!

  9. Last night, I went out with a friend for sushi. One of the rolls we got was gigantic....much as you could try, it was too much to cram in one go. I was relatively successful in 2 rounds of biting cleanly and having an intact remnant, while he was having a more difficult time. For the last piece, he nudged it toward me and told me he wanted to watch my technique...

    Of course, you know it ended up being a mess and the piece fell apart. But to make a mess even messier, when he commented playfully on my "finesse", I started laughing.

    I happen to laugh through my nose on some level, and since my mouth was obviously occupied, all the laughter came out of my nose. Along with the sushi. I dropped my head down and covered my face too late.....

    When I looked up, I had literally SPRAYED him and his side of the table with deconstructed sushi. All over his clothes, in his hair....I think I even got the window behind him. He looked slightly stunned. And to make matters worse, at the sight of it, I only started laughing harder- like tears-rolling-down-the-face, can't-hardly-breathe laughter.

    I was very lucky that he found the situation funny too! (Once the stun wore off.....) He even picked up the tab!

  10. Wrap in a cured meat (I use turkey bacon) and roast in a hot oven (400 degrees F) till the outside is crispy and the bean is crisp-tender.

    Thinly slice onion, sweat with salt in neutral oil, add a little turmeric, cayenne pepper and cumin seeds. Toast the spices for a few seconds, then add green beans and cook to desired doneness. If you need more exact amounts, I'll measure the next time I make 'em. :wink:

  11. Why the 45 minutes to prep rule? You could do things that can be done ahead and served cold or at room temp. Do 'em up a day ahead, fridge 'em and throw 'em on the table when you need to. That takes the pressure off the 45 minute limit and opens up more options. They can't expect it to be super fancy on that budget but you can put out a pretty nice snack spread for $60. Fruits and veggies fit in the healthy rule. Some nice cheese(s) and breads. Chicken salad, tuna salad, egg salad are all fairly cheap to make and can be fancied up a little if you wanted (you can't by a dried out convenience store sandwich for $2 a person so you don't have to go overboard, just make sure it tastes good). If the rules on time and all that are because it's a committee of people trying to do as little as they can get away with (I'm not saying that's the case, I've just been in those situations before) then see if you can fish out 2 or 3 people who don't mind putting a little extra effort into it and do a little evening before "build the snack trays" party.

    Unfortunately, there's no Costco or like place nearby. And the catered offerings around here come out to more than $2/person. Unless I get fruit, vegetable, or tuna/chicken salad platters from the grocery store, which is what the group wants to move away from...

    The 45 min guideline is because the food has to be prepped at the site of the event (at my workplace) in a kitchen that's up to code. And though it's at my workplace, I technically can't prepare the food in the appropriate kitchen because it's not directly linked to my duties. Instead, I have to provide direction for someone else to do the shopping and to prep. And it appears at this point that the person that I need to provide direction to is only willing to assemble- like cutting and arranging things. Heating/cooking things isn't in the picture right now.

    :wacko:

    I would LOVE to bring in stuff that I've prepared at home, even if I was just reimbursed for the ingredients, but I can't.

    For the 1st session, the prep person is comfortable with the following:

    Fresh mozzarella cube, cherry tomato and basil leaf speared on a toothpick

    Store-bought olive tapenade and sliced bread

    I'm hoping that this person will be gaining more confidence/willingness to stretch in prep, and that some budget expansion is on the horizon, but for now I just want to get something other than dried up carrot and celery sticks on the table. :wink:

    Thanks for the ideas so far, everyone! Please keep them coming!

  12. Hi All,

    I've been whisked into a committee unexpectedly to come up with ideas for reception food for a lecture series on a weekly basis. The stipulations are:

    1. It needs to require VERY little prep. Piping fillings into receptacles might even be a stretch....for 30 people, less than 45 minutes of prep.

    2. No heat can be involved.

    3. The budget is relatively low- $2 or less per person.

    4. Relatively healthy would be an added bonus.

    Ideas, please?

    ETA: AppeRtizer?! :laugh:

  13. The government has recently lifted their ban on the peppercorns making them once again available in the US.

    Every place I've asked, they've said it's an illegal import, even though I too thought the ban was lifted in 2005 (?)

    I'm going to Columbus this weekend, so I'm hoping I will be able to make it to the Penzey's there. If not, I suppose I'll have to order more than just Szechuan peppercorns, just to make the shipping costs worthwhile. :wink:

  14. In Cantonese wonton noodle shops, the hot spicy paste that they put on the table is usually a mix of deep-fried garlic, chili pepper flakes, fermented black beans, tons of MSG and plenty of oil.

    Ah Leung (or anyone :biggrin: )....any guidance how to put this together (proportions, melding time, storage, etc.) ? Also, would it be worthwhile to do this if MSG isn't used?

    (don't mean to take this thread too far off topic...can start new one if appropriate!)

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