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RebeccaT

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    Houston, TX
  1. I've tried two more recently, and wasn't nearly as happy as I have been with earlier offerings. First, I picked up the Cheese Crackers - CM's version of Cheese Nips. I was hoping to love them since they are trans-fat free and they have a bit of cayenne. Well, they just didn't have enough taste! The cheese flavor is a little too understated for me, and they were harder and not as flaky as I would have liked them to be. I prefer Late July's cheese crackers. I also tried the CM Organics Honey Nut O's. These were pretty good, although they were a little on the hard side. I enjoyed my box,
  2. Hey there! Churrasco's is so very good. You must get the tres leches, it's incredible. I highly recommend it for that part of town. If you're willing to come in a little bit, Masraff's on South Post Oak is really good, too. Churrasco's would probably be more fun for Emma, though, since it tends to be busier and have more going on inside. I have other recommendations for you, but they might be farther than you'd want to drive (although I can give you alternate directions so that you can avoid I-10 traffic!) Have a great weekend!
  3. Not a question (though I thank you for answering my previous questions), but I just have to provide a testimonial as one who has eaten at t'afia a number of times... I think that the simplicity of philosophy that you have described so many times on this thread is what has made t'afia my favorite restaurant in Houston. There are lots of restaurants I enjoy for various reasons, but when I get to pick that's where I want to go. I don't feel razzle-dazzled, I don't get wide-eyed at the spectacle or event... instead I settle in for food I can think about and enjoy as the sum of its parts AS WELL
  4. I don't even know how to jump into this discussion, so many good points have been raised. And many, many points that I take issue with based on my experience. So I'll just throw this stuff out there, do with it what you will... 1) Junk food is not necessarily less expensive than fresh food, in fact, sometimes it is more. However, it has a shelf-life of eons, and is already prepared for you saving you the time/effort/education required to make something from raw ingredients. This makes it cheaper. THis is a key reason why lower-income families often rely heavily, too heavily, on prepared f
  5. Monica, thank you so much for joining us! I am a humongous fan of all you do... the farmer's market, t'afia, all of it. I appreciate that you get out and touch your clientele directly, not hiding in the kitchen, and that they feel like they are getting to know you by watching you work with food. I also thank you for you description of Naxos. I was there just a year and a half ago, and your description brought back so many memories. I can't tell you if Ellie's is still there... there are so many restaurants there on the waterfront and just behind up into the Castro. It was there that we f
  6. Yes, it is, and they now have market on Wednesdays from 4-7PM as well as on Saturday mornings. I went by last Wednesday, it was quiet, but they had AWESOME tomatoes (I tried a variety called Cherokee Purple, I think, and it was wonderful - almost smoky tasting), fresh berries (way expensive at $4 for a half-pint, but very plump and tasty) and some excellent Texas peaches (I am hard to please on peaches, being from Georgia, but these were great!) I meant to go on Saturday but didn't make it, which is scandalous since I live less than a mile away. They have music on Saturdays, too, which is f
  7. Hi Anna! I am excited to try your ginger cookies! I love that they have cayenne in them, I think that will add a great bite. How do you think they will work as smaller cookies? I can't be trusted around gigantic cookies because I hate leaving anything behind - it's easier for me to eat 1 small cookie and stop there than eat 1/2 of a large cookie and no more... KWIM?
  8. Kristin and Anna, thank you so much for the continued description of the class, and thank you Dana for the additional suggestions! I am going to keep an eye out for that cookbook. It doesn't look like Rebecca is scheduled to come to Central Market in Houston in the near future, but I will keep checking for her classes. Thanks again!
  9. oooh, Anna, those look great! I will have to check out that book. Was this a hands-on class, or more of a demonstration? Off to check out CM's site to see if she's coming to Houston...
  10. Yes! Please post it in RecipeGullet and link it here. ← Texas Sheet Cake Oh, gosh, I hope I did it right! I went ahead and posted the entire recipe (with edited directions, in an attempt to appease the RecipeGullet gods). Please let me know if I did it incorrectly; it was my first RG entry!
  11. I was at Central Market on Westheimer on Saturday and saw Tyler along with a modest line of folks waiting to talk to him and get him to autograph hie cookbook. There was some AM talk radio show broadcasting there as well. I am not certain why they did the book signing in the store, as it was a beautiful day outside and the setup made it pretty crowded (they put him at a table in front of the bulk dips/ice cream freezer section). He's a cutie! I decided that I wasn't interested enough in his book to wait in the line, however. He seemed like he was really talking to people, letting them ta
  12. Texas Sheet Cake Serves 16 as Dessert. This recipe is based on a Cooking Light recipe. It's not very light, though! I use butter instead of margarine, and whole or 2% milk in the frosting. I also like to increase the cinnamon to 1 1/2 tsp. Cake Cooking Spray 2 tsp all-purpose flour 2 c all-purpose flour 2 c sugar 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp salt 3/4 c water 1/2 c butter or stick margarine 1/4 c cocoa 1/2 c buttermilk 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 large eggs Icing 6 T butter or stick margarine 1/3 c fat-free milk 1/4 c cocoa 3 c powdered sugar 1/4 c chopped pecans
  13. Texas Sheet Cake Serves 16 as Dessert. This recipe is based on a Cooking Light recipe. It's not very light, though! I use butter instead of margarine, and whole or 2% milk in the frosting. I also like to increase the cinnamon to 1 1/2 tsp. Cake Cooking Spray 2 tsp all-purpose flour 2 c all-purpose flour 2 c sugar 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp salt 3/4 c water 1/2 c butter or stick margarine 1/4 c cocoa 1/2 c buttermilk 1 tsp vanilla extract 2 large eggs Icing 6 T butter or stick margarine 1/3 c fat-free milk 1/4 c cocoa 3 c powdered sugar 1/4 c chopped pecans
  14. I love this cake, but my first exposure to it was from Cooking Light of all places. They have an excellent recipe with a hint of cinnamon. It's not exactly "light" fare, but it's not as deadly as some versions, and it's very good. I don't ever make mine in the jelly roll pan that it calls for, though; I make it in a 9x13 pyrex, which just makes it thicker (more like 2" I guess). And the frosting, oh the frosting... so good! This is a great thing to take to a summer cookout. Editing now that I've read the article... I don't really like the fact that they use a regular buttercream, and just
  15. I am from Atlanta, born and reared. While I miss my Vidalias, I will concede that 1015s are an acceptable substitute. I like to use them in a simple cucumber salad. Peel, seed, and slice paper thin a cucumber or two. Thinly slice half a 1015 (or Vidalia. Sigh.) and toss together. Add white vinegar, rice vinegar, kosher salt and pepper to taste. Chill in fridge for an hour or two and serve with burgers or barbecue chicken.
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