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hathor

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Posts posted by hathor


  1. Wow...love that double oven. Very nice! 

     

    Electric ranges absolutely are the most infuriating, useless, frustrating things on the planet. Invented by food stylist for photo shoots, not for cooking. 

    If you enjoy the zen of waiting for water to boil...electric is the way to go. If scorching food because the response time is so ...incredibly....slow, then by all means

    go electric. They are however easy to clean, until you spill something, then after going at it with a razor blade, a pick ax seems like a good idea...this is the range for you! 

    But wait...let me tell you how I really feel.... 

    #nochoicebutelectricsoIamdoomed

    • Like 2

  2. On 2/28/2016 at 7:09 PM, Shel_B said:

     

    Doubtful, even considering personal preference.  I'd suggest you try making your pasta water truly  as salty as sea water and see how you like it.  Might be just right for your taste.

     

    http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/how-salty-should-pasta-water-be.html

    Here's the kicker...different seas have different levels of salt! Now what? LOL! 

    I've seen and read all sorts of theories about the amount of salt. Find what you like & enjoy it. That's the absolute beauty of home cooking. 

    • Like 1

  3. I wonder if people would be more receptive after they've been there once? I think my hesitation would be if I've never been to the restaurant, would

    I want to prepay? Unless, of course, the press was off the hook! Maybe add the pre-pay as an option with a little 'discount' for regulars? Would a membership club idea appeal? 

     

    I'd also prefer to have the tip included. Leave all the booze/wine optional. Make it as no brainless as possible. You can figure out how to get tips added onto the booze part... 

     

    • Like 3

  4. Cacio e pepe is a 'traditional' southern Italian recipe. Traditional means every household makes it differently. And it's cucina e povera, poor people food, so that means no food goes to waste & you use what you have. 

    About the only thing I'd say is a constant is to use dried spaghetti. The rest is up to personal taste & what's in the fridge. 

    My version is something like a carbonara e pepe. I use egg. Sometimes I go completely radical and throw in some saffron. Delicious. 

    I like lots of pepper, so that's what I use. When I get tired of grinding & it looks right, I'm done. relax. enjoy. 

     

    (P.S. Salt in the pasta water: its not a measurement, it's a mantra:  "The pasta water should be as salty as the sea."

    • Like 1

  5. I'm with Mjx... the pan to use is the one you have available. Preferably a saute pan with a thick bottom. It's more about timing, technique & flavorful stock than it is about the pan. 

    I'm a dead-on purist. You can make rice in all sorts of pots, pans and even canning jars; but you've made a rice dish, not risotto. 

    Nothing wrong with that at all. Nothing un-delicious. It's just not a risotto. 


  6. 22 hours ago, gfweb said:

     

     

    'Under what conditions is it possible is the point'....but not whether it is a viable idea?

    Same thing no?

     

    Why can't you say that after doing diligent research you came up with several flaws that would probably doom the restaurant? 

     

    That would make you sound intelligent.

     

     

     

     You can ace this by taking the immense amount of knowledge here and laying out the reasons why the original premise is flawed. There is no shame in saying Plan A didn't work, here's Plan B or Plan C. The ability to process information, articulate your reasoning and develop iterations would demonstrate your understanding of the assignment. Go for it. 

    • Like 7

  7. Well, HFT. Harrison..you've certainly come to the right place to have this sort of discussion!

    I think we've established this isn't a practical concept, or even a particularly desired concept. But, the volume of replies means you've sparked something

     

    Just for fun. Let's pretend it was actually possible to do what you suggest. My Fantasy Restaurant: Whatever Your Stomach Desires.

    However, in my version of the fantasy, I don't have to wait 24 hours...it comes immediately after I've finished my cocktail.

    BTW, I'm picturing something like what Judy Jetson had in her kitchen (Harrison, you're too young..Google up The Jetsons cartoons)...the food pops out of a machine, delivered by a robot.

     

    How would that play out? Would diners oogle each others plates and ask to order what 'they're having'? Would there be one-upmanship? A spit-roasted Bull-Sheep-Goat-Tur-Ducken BBQ?

    It would be a fabulous social experiment...and the metrics could be debated forever!

     

    Have fun with your paper!

     

     

    • Like 3

  8. 1 hour ago, tchefunkte said:

    I like to check out local cuisine as well. But some cities that I worked in for extended periods (Sioux City, Iowa and Philadelphia, Mississippi come to mind) had a pretty short list of culinary gems, to say the least! I was mostly interested in developing the idea of what you can do within the limitations of a meager per diem and with limited tools.

    Ping me next time you need to go to Philly. It's full of gems. 

     

    Not sure how I would feel about smelling that food in the hallway...or if I had the room after you. Just sayin....

    • Like 3

  9. Flipping pages online is a needless PITA. All those "reader" programs are hideous at best.

     

    For reading...really reading...layout should be traditional print-ish without all the clickbait/links that distract and irritate. They are tolerable on a website but not in something that is meant to be read and savored.

     

    Online magazines can be done well, I think. The trick is to minimize clicks and distractions...eg make an illustration appear without a click. Anything integral to the piece should just appear as it would in a magazine. If you want to link a reference, fine; but not a table or a photo.

    Thanks for the comments. I hear you on the clickbait. It dumbs down the whole page. 

    99% of my reading is done digitally, in part because it feels more eco-groovy, in part because it's so portable. 

    Also love the multi-media aspect of digital. You can put in as many pics or illustrations as you want (or as memory allows). 

    It's liberating. 


  10. Ciao Mike. If most of your e-books are in pdf that's a significant limitation to interactive spreadsheets. As Chris Hennes mentioned, you could set up a webpage to do that and the webpage could be password protected, behind a paywall etc etc. There are many choices. If you did around on some of the e-book publishing sites and forums you can probably find some answers. 


  11. I'm too nomadic for paper magazine subscriptions to be practical, but I do subscribe to Lucky Peach and Fool

    Cherry Bombe intrigues me, but it's too expensive ($20 bucks an issue!)

     

    I'm in djyee's camp: I prefer online publications. Multi-media options, no paper or transport so it feels greener etc etc. 

    Lucky Peach made a big deal out of being a print only mag, and as of last month, they also have a digital version. 

     

    General question: what sort of format would you enjoy in an online magazine? Do you want to flip pages like a magazine? (example: New Yorker magazine)

    Does that not matter, and you don't care if it looks like a website? 

    Is the whole idea of an online magazine confusing or irrelevant? 

    I'm asking because I'm working on a project that will be an online quarterly Digest, single themed and we're in the thick of discussions about layout, usage etc. 

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated! 


  12. Our recent riff on the Martinez...a San Martin!  You must pronounce San Martin with a French accent or it will not taste the same.

    2 oz. gin (House Spirits, Distiller Reserve...boutique distller in Portland Or. Pitty we only have a small bottle.)

    1 oz sweet vermouth (Carpano Antica Formula)

    1/4 oz St. Germaine

    2 dashes orange bitters

     

    Bonne boisoon!


  13. Oh my.

    To see so many of the 'old faces' here.. Anna N has changed her avator. Maggie the Cat...you have no idea how often I've thought of your wit. Andisenji who has every kitchen gadget in the world and knows how to use them.

    Weinoo is a real world friend. Bleudavergne...have you heard the news? I think not or you would be here. Katie Loeb's cocktails...virtually & in person.  Reading Anthony Bourdain & Michael's Ruhlman's post about being 

    dead drunk in Central Park. It was the crazy cowboy days of the internet and Steve and Jason created a universe where we could connect.

    I owe so very much to eGullet. Steven, you will be missed.

    • Like 10

  14. Most likely I ere on the side of laissez fare: but what makes anyone think those toothpicks are clean? How'd they get into the container? How did they get made into toothpicks? By what chemical process do we get beautiful, clean lookng, totally consistent toothpicks? Or those damn plastic gloves that get used and then tossed and cannot be recycled? What sort of bigger mess are they creating?

    I'll take my chances with server hands. I'm assuming he or she used soap in the bathroom, and the hands have now been in and out of water as they work. And the booze calls all, including your memory of server hands in the olive container.

    As far as a/c goes...somebody send me a truly descriptive, poetic, evocative, and cool summary of what it's like to be in an air conditioned bar.... I want to remember.....

    Warmest regards from an over heated Italy!


  15. Seems like a weird cut, if you butcher them that way, you lose two saleable breasts. Perhaps they're a byproduct of ground white chicken meat? When you say they're inexpensive, how much do they cost relative to breasts?

    Have to agree. That is a strange cut unless the breast is being used for something else.

    Some investigating turned up this: My link

    And I have a message in to David Brown to ask how this cut came to be.


  16. Tom Colicchio? I have never been to any of his restaurants, but I am wondering if he is more than a popular face on Top Chef. Is he cashing in on his fame, or is he really that talented?

    I cant speak for whats happening with his places now as I haven't eaten in one in a few years, but he is not a "created for TV" chef. He was/is very talented.

    At the recent IACP Conference in NYC, there was a panel discussion with Mario Batali, Gabrielle Hamilton, Peter Kaminsky, Sam Sifton and Doug Duda. They were discussing the power of reviews and Sam Sifton said his favorite reader comment was someting like, "I haven't been to that restaurant, but I'm sure you're wrong."

    Which makes me wonder, unless we've eaten the chef's food for years, at numerous locations, are we in any position to answer Weinoo's question?

    Recently, I've eaten a few lunches at Tom Colicchio's restaurant on 10th Ave. Gorgeous space, bit flaky staff, but the food was spot on delicious. I'm a sucker for good skate and this was bangin' good. Also good value for a 'nice' lunch. I can't speak to what Chef Colicchio did before, and I didn't even know he was on TV (I live under a rock for a large part of the year.) I just know the food was good to great.


  17. Nice looking blog, 3HungryTummies!

    Like Shalmaese, I can't figure out what the cut is. Chicken backs? Not if they're meaty.

    We love chicken thighs in our house, more flavor & juicer. I bet the lemon chicken would work very nicely on chicken thighs.

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