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Pere Hugo

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    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
  1. Pere Hugo

    Dinner! 2004

    Went to the farmers' market and got the biggest cabbage ever, turned it into cabbage rolls (using beef and arborio rice et al), and braised in tomato-ginger sauce. Added potato pancakes and sour cream on the side. Nice cheap red. Fall is here at last.
  2. When I go there, lunch is always a toss up between the Chicken Parmisan Sandwich at the Carosel or the Fish Sandwich at Busters.
  3. Speaking of the Time-Life Good Cook series, I have the complete set of 28--from "Beverages" to "Candy" and everything in between. I got them by subscription in the '80's and recall eagerly waiting for the next monthly volume. The series taught me a whole lot about real, genuine cooking. I have several hundred cookbooks by now but its been a while since I have bought because it seems more self-indulgent than before. But I do covet Paul Bertolli's new "Cooking by Hand"--let's hope it goes on sale real soon.
  4. Pere Hugo

    Dinner! 2004

    Grilled chicken breast (brushed with hoisin) on a bed of mesclun, topped with sliced mango, a peanut sauce, chopped coriander and chopped peanuts. Side of sticky rice. Yum, Pere
  5. Just because eggpant absorbs oil doesn't mean that one must saturate it. I have found that just cooking it down, thickens it enough. By the way, ratatouilli is one of those things that attacts a score of "experts" extolling the "authentic" version. (Something like chili con carne). Just make it that way it tastes best to you. In my mind no concoctions, just bringing out the best of fresh ingredients.
  6. I am presently re-reading Nicolas Freeling's "The Kitchen Book and The Cook Book." I used to enjoy his crime fiction back in the '70s and he brings the same style to this recounting of his apprentice and professional cooking days. Full of mores and characters maybe too kindly portrayed. (I assume the cooks'culture in Europe was much the same as described more graphically by Anthony Bourdain) Also "American Gourmet" by Jane and Michael Stern (1991). A sometimes bizarre collection of cultural memories of the way we were. And let's hear it for MFK....
  7. I used to swear by Lick's until they started to sell their burger and veggie patties in the frozen food department at Dominion Stores. The product is dry and salty and not very beefy tasting. I swear that they now use the same frozen product in their restaurants. Needless to say, I haven't been back since. Hear, hear to Allen's burger. Wonderful with a tall one in the back patio.
  8. There is a Paderno outlet in Heartland Mississauga. It is on the north-east corner of Britannia and Mavis. Paderno is Canadian made, solid, smart and will last forever. May be a bit pricy, but the company has periodic sales with selected items over 50% off. By the way, a lot of restaurant supply places carry Paderno too.
  9. With me, its a seasonal thing. I couldn't imagine living down south without the extremes of climate we have up here. In summer, we look forward to slow simmered stews with sauces, rich baked goods, sweet winter vegetables etc. In winter we look forward to grilled burgers, sates, and koftas with salsas and fresh produce. We once tried pulled pork with cole slaw and baked beans in the dark of February but it just didn't taste right. It goes with sultry summer evenings out in the garden. Pot roast just isn't the same on a sweltering summer day. So we keep the grill packed away for the winter and
  10. With me, its a seasonal thing. I couldn't imagine living down south without the extremes of climate we have up here. In summer, we look forward to slow simmered stews with sauces, rich baked goods, sweet winter vegetables etc. In winter we look forward to grilled burgers, sates, and koftas with salsas and fresh produce. We once tried pulled pork with cole slaw and baked beans in the dark of February but it just didn't taste right. It goes with sultry summer evenings out in the garden. Pot roast just isn't the same on a sweltering summer day. So we keep the grill packed away for the winter and
  11. Well, with a brand new regime in City Hall, can something political be done to change the "rules" to date? Now, I know there are weightier things on the municipal agenda, but could some benighted councillor be persuaded to bring the subject of our woefully inadequate public thoroughfare victuals to the attention of council? It might lighten their daily statutary load with a bit of cheer. After all isn't a decent lunch what it's all about? ( My own powers of persuasion are blunted by the unfortunate fact that I am not a taxpayer or voter of Toronto; just to the west actually. But we do work an
  12. I am sure there is a simple expanation for the monotony of hot dog/sausage vendors in Toronto. Other cities have a lively variety of various hot food vendors serving pedustrians. Why don't we have, say, empanadas or chicken parmesan or pho or falafel or even bagels? Is this because of minicipal licencing provisions, or we are just too boring in our tastes? I thought Toronto had come a long way in the last 30 years.
  13. Pere Hugo

    Dinner! 2004

    Chicken and Dumplings (American heartland style). Shaker salad. We only have this about once every three years, so was a treat. The kids had forgotten what dumplings were. It apparently spring next week, so we are in a rush to use up winter recipes before bbq/grill season.
  14. My wife and I lived in Montreal over 20 years ago and still remember with fondness our local depanneur and convenient plonk. We could leave our appartment, go down to the lobby, turn left, then left again and walk into our own depanneur. Grab a pack of spaghetti and ajar of sauce, a generic red wine. Instant party without leaving the building.
  15. I had thought that "peameal" bacon was the same thing as "Canadian" bacon because historically the Canadians fed their pigs peameal instead of whatever the American hogs got. Presumably the peameal made for more tender and better flavoured meat. By the way, is that really peameal that coats Canadian bacon? It seems to me to be more like cornmeal.
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