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  1. Past hour
  2. I am almost awake now and I remember what Kerry said when we spotted that turkey as we arrived at the hotel, “You know it will be a drinking weekend when the first thing you spot is a Wild Turkey.” It’s cool and rainy out there but I thought I’d share the view from my hotel room anyway. Normally in my home I look at the back end of somebody else’s house and not much else so I’m enjoying this very much. There are small Keurig coffee makers in each room and I thought you might enjoy this little bit of wyzdom: The dining room is quite lovely. This is only a very small part of it. There was quite a spread for breakfast but I only wanted eggs and some toast: Kerry added a few other things to her plate. She had some tea with her breakfast with lots of milk as usual. The staff were very attentive — almost too attentive — but so pleasant and they spoke quietly as if expecting that everyone would arrive for breakfast hungover.
  3. What thread do I need to open to see how you cooked that friendly specimen? Teo
  4. Couple of quick clarifications - we are tested medical residents and it’s for the College of Family Physicians. Everything else is the gods honest truth, including the corn on the salad!
  5. liuzhou

    Lunch 2019

    Well, I haven't noticed any signs of rampant idiocy! Lamb / mutton does have a noticeable aroma which some people find difficult! It doesn't bother me at all. Many people down here in southern China, can't deal with it at all, but it's popular in the north-west. I remember requesting lambs' liver here once and the wait staff recoiling in horror!
  6. Today
  7. No! I've come over all shaky. A fit of the vapors, methinks. I may have to lie down for a day or three! Although , a couple or three of those Guinnesses may help. Purely for medicinal reasons, you understand.
  8. Yay!!! Road trip!!! What an great unexpected surprise I hope @liuzhou has recovered from seeing corn in that Cobb salad.......
  9. OK, but the question is how do you dispose of it?
  10. CantCookStillTry

    Lunch 2019

    Not topic friendly but wanting to learn. I had hoarded a couple of lamb leg bones (in the freezer) to make stock. It was the first time I had tried lamb stock, intended for a barley based soup, but it smelled. Not bad exactly but ... strong. I have no problem with the smell of lamb or mutton whilst cooking or cooked ... but the stock whiffed "strong". It tasted fine but the smell made me throw it out just in case. Does lamb stock have a strong smell whilst cooking? Much more so than beef? Am I an idiot?
  11. Yana Sizzzlers

    What do people do with oil used for deep frying?

    soybean oil because it is neutral in flavor .
  12. Just finished the last of a bag of blood oranges. They held up well, probably had them for a month in the fridge. It was a good value and I will look for them again next year, the oranges were Sunkist brand and I think there were 10 in the bag, only had one that had a bad spot.
  13. What kind of oil do you use in your several restaurants in India?
  14. CantCookStillTry

    Lunch 2019

    I bought some pork sausages that (to me) were horrible - heavy on the Fennel. So deskinned, added Sage & White Pepper, sweated onion, carrot and spinach. Partially cooked the sausage meat to defat a little - combine with a little faffing about and Voila! Lunchbox fodder for the small dude.
  15. Yana Sizzzlers

    What do people do with oil used for deep frying?

    Even I also used same type of oil for fish & for some time bbq. I like to ask something, What Is The Healthiest Oil For Deep Frying?
  16. Gotcha. You thought that London. It is this London: Yes, we are in London, Ontario. This weekend Kerry is helping to examine medical students taking their final exams before getting their licence to practice. The venue is London, Ontario. She invited me along so I could have a change of pace. She will spend most of the time living up to the expectations of the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons but we will do our best to keep you amused with whatever food-based adventures we can muster. I will be taking advantage of a quiet hotel room to work on a personal project. This was my first clue that it was going to be an interesting weekend: we saw this handsome chap just as we entered the hotel grounds. That this would be a challenging weekend became apparent when I entered my room: I am 4 feet 9 1/2 inches tall. This bed comes almost to my waist. Verticality is not my only challenge. Getting into this bed would require some ingenuity. Between Kerry and the front desk the problem is more or less solved. By the time we arrived at the hotel and stashed our belongings it was getting towards 8 PM. Neither one of us was seriously hungry and so we opted to just grab something ready-made from one of the local supermarkets. This one was almost as well stocked with beer as our beer store: This is just a small example of the selection available. Kerry had a Guinness with a Cobb salad and some thousand Island dressing. I had a Rickards Red with a chicken Caesar salad. Not the most exciting meals but we will try to do better. I have been tasked with the enormous responsibility of researching the available restaurants. I am open to suggestions. The hotel puts on a buffet breakfast and we will saunter down there somewhere around 7:30 this morning.
  17. Another catching up post - this was my contribution to the Passover eve dinner desserts. Icebox cakes (as I've been taught they are called in English - In Hebrew it's "biscuit cake"). One flavored with coconut and topped with sweetened coconut flakes. The other flavored with peanut butter and topped with caramelized peanuts. Both had the biscuits dipped in coffee and covered with grated chocolate. Our hostess made a passover classic - nuts tart (walnuts and hazelnuts) lightly soaked in liquor and topped with apricot jam and whipped cream. No picture.
  18. demiglace

    Popsicles

    Yay, it's popsicle season!
  19. HungryChris

    Gardening: (2016– )

    Wild ramp omelet. I'm not sure if these ramps in my two modest patches can be called wild, as I put them together with several trips to the Union Square Farmer's Market over a few years, planting them when I got them home. They do not propagate well at my low altitude, so I leave the bulbs in the ground and have to be happy with just the leaves, which I greatly enjoy. HC
  20. gulfporter

    Dinner 2019

    Went to a nearby (5 minute walk) trendy spot in Lisbon's Cais do Sodre district, Taberna Tosca. I had the pork cheeks in a delicious wild mushroom wine broth, topped with crispy sweet potato shards....the meat so tender it fell apart with my spoon. DH had a tempura shrimp pancake with green curry sauce....nice clean fry, excellent batter and sauce. My pictures do not do the dishes justice. Excellent Portuguese red wines, meal with wine was 30 euros.
  21. BonVivant

    Dinner 2019

    Another nice buchon called "Notre Maison". There's a cook and 2 other persons doing everything else. It's a young team and things are more relaxed here. You can sit anywhere, whereas at other buchons you can't. Serving style is informal, like how I do it at home. The butter at this restaurant also comes with a knife in it and with the wrapping paper intact. Slice as much as you like. Braised beef cheeks Slow-cooked lentils with sausage. The sausage has a specific taste, similar to the strong taste of pork I had on the first day. When you are done eating you get some booze. I think it's whiskey. You may pour as much as you like. How they want you to feel eating here. Many French tourists are a bit shocked and delighted at the same time. I had done my research well so for me it was no surprise. I had a nice time here. The young crew is lovely. There's a resident cat. Very affectionate creature, he has a path build on the wall. Non matching chairs are probably from charity shops or given by relatives and friends. Where the cat drinks Behind me is the smallest fireplace I've ever seen.
  22. BonVivant

    Lunch 2019

    My name is on a specific table in the seating layout (I saw all the tables had names on them). Traditional buchons are only open for about 2,5hrs for lunch or dinner. The boss comes to each table (he knows whose turn it is) to explain the dishes they are serving. The "menu" is handwritten on a piece of paper and it changes a little every day depending on what they have. Boss is humorous and cool. One of the reasons his buchon is one of the most popular in town. Gratin and sauteed vegs. Everyone got this same plate today. A braising French cut, tender and still retains texture. Notice both handles on my Staub dish are missing. I wouldn't throw mine out either. Traditional Lyonnaise food is meat and offal heavy. These pork cheeks can be cut with a spoon. Every single table is reserved. If you want to eat at this kind of place best to reserve in advance. It takes around 2 hours to eat a meal and the place is opens for about 2,5 hours. Menu outside the kitchen Restaurant is on a tiny street with cars parked in front of it. Well, then I made a photo of a photo instead.
  23. jimb0

    The Bread Topic (2016-)

    Long time listener, first time caller. So much good bread in this thread. I eat very little bread these days, staying away from carbs. But it probably remains my favourite food, so I do a lot of baking and either give it all away or send it to work in my SO's lunch. These past few months I've been on a kick of making stuffed rolls and buns; we have creatively started referring to them 'stuffs'. So far I've filled them with leftovers, meats, cheeses (cream cheese-based ones are easy, too). A couple of small ones makes for a nice lunch focal point. This often gets combined with my love of using non-traditional hydration sources. In one case I was inspired by borscht. Cooked some beets and mashed them into the dough; they were filled with cream cheese, onions, dill, and capers. I was honestly pretty amazed at how well the colour stayed. These are the same dough (I really only ever bake with two doughs and just twist them to fit the circumstance), only made with carrot juice and filled with cream cheese, candied ginger, and something else, then rolled in walnuts (kindly ignore the experimental sausage balls in the background). The carrot juice adds a lovely colour and slight sweetness to an ordinary enriched dough, too, though I could have done a better job on dough development as the texture wasn't really up to snuff: Additionally, has anyone experimented with fermenting bread with brewing yeasts? I've played around with a few and gotten some good results. I've read that using some of the traditional brown ale yeasts can lend an oatmeal-ish flavour to a bread that contains, in fact, no oats; it's something I want to try.
  24. It was quite a few years ago - back in the days when the Americans were a little hesitant to sell to Canadians. I suspect it wouldn't be a problem these days.
  25. ElsieD

    Dinner 2019

    Aw, you're too kind. Don't know about stunning, but it probably would have looked better. I have some, too, but didn't think to use them.
  26. scubadoo97

    Dinner 2019

    The steak does look great but I want that potato. Broccoli or broccolini looks good too. Love carbs.
  27. Okanagancook

    Dinner 2019

    On an all white plate it probably would have looked stunning.
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