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  1. Past hour
  2. Here are some bettter shots from our current setup. One of the unusual features of this trailer is the side deck that folds down, with sliding glass doors to allow sun into the living area. This is one of my favorite features of the trailer. The deck is a good place to hang out in the sunshine (or shade), sitting and listening or reading. The stargazing last night was wonderful until the moon rose. On the other side of the trailer (bottom half of the picture above) you can see the room glides that move out to make living space when we're parked. At the back of the trailer is the ramp that allows us to get the wheeled toys out of the "garage" when we're parked. The ramp can be set to a level position, as it is here, for a rear deck. This also has an awning and rail, if needed.
  3. I found a patch of prickly pear cactus loaded with fruit (tunas) and have harvested some for the juice. I picked about 30 and froze them, with the intent of following instructions given me on the Camping, Princess Style topic here and here. Now they're rinsed and draining for the second step. @lemniscate chimed in with a steaming operation for the juice instead, here. Next time I'll try that for comparison purposes. So far, the things I've learned are: 1. use metal tongs, not silicone, to harvest the tunas if possible; otherwise you'll spend precious time removing glochids (very, very fine small spines from the fruit) from the silicone when you're done; 2. immediately discard the plastic bag (or box, if you use that instead) into which you collected the tunas, instead of reusing it for something else; otherwise, you'll spend precious time removing those glochids from your fingers.
  4. The frozen tunas are rinsed and draining into the tallest bowl I could find, with a standard footed colander to provide some space between the juice and the pulp and a fine-mesh colander inside that one to block more of the glochids. Per @Shelby's suggestion, I've started discussing this operation in the Foraging for favorites topic, here. Note to self: if you harvest the fruit into a plastic bag, discard that bag immediately after dumping it. Do not plan to reuse it, because it's loaded with glochids. Those teeny devils are darned hard to spot and grab with tweezers! I've made enough room in the freezer to start a fresh batch of ice. My darling should be happy.
  5. Today
  6. Ann_T

    Breakfast 2019

    Today's Breakfast. Beef Dip Sandwich. Thinly sliced leftover roast from Monday on a homemade baguette with double fried french fries.
  7. @Kim Shook, I too am in awe of your gravy...and the timing of making it. (I have a small idea of what a grab bag your visits can be. Here's hoping this is a good one. I'm sure the food will be delicious.) If I ever try making turkey gravy again -- I haven't cooked a turkey in years, and don't plan to this year -- I will look back at your tutorial and give it a try.
  8. I sued to get coffee from here : http://www.connoisseurcoffeeco.com/index.html I grew up one town south , and always brought back 4 - 6 bags of their coffee on trips to visit my parents. friendly people , excellent coffee I mention them as they , in the past , have different roast levels for most if not all of their coffee's I don't know if they still do , nor can I comment on their prices and shipping fees. My father used to send both my sister and myself a selection from time to time. so look into them re roast levels etc good luck I now roast my own , or Id still be getting coffee from them
  9. ...and then, if we want to talk *seriously* old-school food storage techniques, there's this: https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/10/the-worlds-oldest-leftovers-left-in-pleistocene-storage-containers/
  10. HELP! About to be out of coffee beans, I turned to my usual mail-order source, Cafe Brazil in Dallas, whose Brazil Estates blend I have been ordering for the better part of 15 years. They no longer carry it; in fact, they no longer carry any medium roasts at all except for flavored blends, which I abhor. All they have is dark roasts, which I also dislike wholeheartedly. Who can give me leads to a good, full-bodied, medium roast coffee bean I can dependably order? I was paying in the neighborhood of $12-15 per pound for my Brazil Estates, and would like to stay in that range. I'm far from a coffee purist. I fill my refillable K-cup with it and brew in a Keurig, unless I take a notion and want to go with the French press. I drink it with cream, no sugar. I want NO bitterness. just a rich, buttery brew. Tips?
  11. Margaret Pilgrim

    Dinner 2019

    @liamsaunt Gorgeous, both!
  12. liamsaunt

    Dinner 2019

    Baked a lot of olive bread yesterday To serve with chile linguini with scallops fra diavolo and fennel
  13. they actually made a container for a roast chicken....l had one! Unfortunately it took up a half shelf in the fridge.
  14. Remember how the pieces you used and washed over and over would get sticky? We had those Tupperware tumblers. I loved them. Mama also had at least one of ever bowl they made, I think. And one of us had the grating/slicing thing; I don't remember ever using the grater/slicer, but we used the dish and its accompanying cover a good bit. My first thought on the canned ham holder was that it'd be ideal to hold a roast chicken, if it's big enough.
  15. This one is still $2.99 on Amazon.com and $2.51 on Amazon.ca. As @MelissaH pointed out, it's not a Kindle single, it's the full version of the book. You can check out a review of it and a sample recipe over here at EYB.
  16. Egg white works. It's what I used to use when I could still make, and eat, this. One of my very favorite breads.
  17. @Kim Shook There is only one truism re Thanksgiving: There is never enough gravy. Ever!
  18. @Margaret Pilgrim - thank you so much. I hope Momma and I have a good time. She has dementia, so you never know what you're going to get. I was up there at 2am night before last because she was raising hell and threatening to leave and then yesterday she was so sociable and hilarious, we had a crowd around us visiting with her. The gravy is done: It tastes great. Every year when I start it, I get this fear that it somehow won't turn out that time. It has never failed me yet! It is always a little disheartening when you start with a gallon of liquid and you end up with less than half that amount of gravy. 😁
  19. The first and third book are no longer at those prices but strangely, the cupcake one was free. Edited to add: I just recieved notice that I was charged 99 cents for the book.
  20. Margaret Pilgrim

    Dinner 2019

    Kidding aside, "pastured eggs" are wonderful substitutes for farm eggs. I am really lucky to be able to find them at Grocery Outlet for around $2.99 a dozen or less than half their regular retail. We have become very spoiled.
  21. Prior to refrigeration, meat was primarily preserved by drying, smoking or salt-curing. All are still practiced today, with modern assistance. Vegetables, particularly corn and legumes, were left on the plant until dried, and then harvested, to be saved and used over winter months. Fruits were dried. As a child, I helped my grandmother, whose young adulthood was in the rural South pre-electricity, lay apple and peach slices, berries and cherries out on sheets on the roof to dry; they'd be taken in at night, put back out in the morning, Potatoes were dug, layered in wooden boxes with straw, and stored in the cellar. Softer vegetables were canned or pickled, at least in the 19th and early 20th centuries, when glass jars were readily available. Before that, I expect they were simply eaten in the summer and not the winter. Large meals were cooked at noon for the folks working in the fields, and dishes of food were left on the table, covered with a cloth, until supper, when they were finished off at room temperature.
  22. Margaret Pilgrim

    Fruit

    Many, many thanks for this.
  23. heidih

    Dinner 2019

    My chickens always ran around in a large area in their crazy way (until a hawk flew over or Rudy Rooster got horny) - they are more aware than one would imagine. Great flavor in the eggs
  24. heidih

    Fruit

    This is how I see people grabbing them in the grocery stores and farmers markts. So they will ripen on their own once brought home? They seemed kinda boring to me when I tasted.in the pictured state.
  25. TicTac

    Dinner 2019

    Do they throw the eggs into the pasture after the chickens lay them? 😋
  26. chromedome

    Fruit

    I wouldn't have expected them to so resemble crabapples. Very interesting.
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