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  1. Past hour
  2. I was just reading Leite's Culinaria and saw the featured recipe was for Venison with Balsamic Blackberry Sauce. I really like that site, but I'm not a venison eater (just never really get exposed to it much) and can't say how good it would be. Thought I would include the link to the recipe, just in case you were interested. 🙂 What is your weather like these days? I suspect we would have heard if there was any snow 😄, but wonder how cold your temps are getting. I love your blogs, @Shelby!
  3. Aha! Never thought of adding blue cheese to egg salad. 'Open a new window; open a new door..."
  4. Thanks Chris - that is an amazing recounting of such diverse and unexpected flavors. What goes on in that man's mind Also I appreciate the no photo descriptions. It makes us think more about what it tasted like. Much like Marlena Spieler's non image blog https://forums.egullet.org/topic/80538-eg-foodblog-marlena-life-is-delicious-wherever-i-am/ Hpefully others will have the chance to visit and report.
  5. Yesterday
  6. I am tackling that solo - which, as a hard core introvert, is not a bad thing!
  7. I am from the Iron Range in Minnesota, (As Smithy mentioned) and Potica was always a holiday staple. Any chance (fingers crossed) you would share your recipe???
  8. 1- water, not a joke, there's nothing more satisfying than drinking water when you need it 2- strawberries, the small ones just picked from the plant, not the huge flavorless crap found in stores 3- wild blackberries, huge pita to collect but they taste like the sun 4- "verdoni", a kind of green plum similar to greengage and reine claude 5- mulberries, if I were forced to choose then I would pick the white ones over the black ones 6- figs, when in season I can't stop eating them 7- radicchio tardivo, the best vegetable we grow in this region 8- carrots, when I was a child I loved going in the garden, picking a carrot from the soil, washing it and eating it raw 9- tonka beans, I used them in many pastries and loved all them 10- ylang ylang, such an inebriating aroma I can live without meat, fish and cheese, but don't touch my fruit. Teo
  9. We've already discussed Bulrush quite a bit here, of course: Chef/Owner Rob Connoley (@gfron1)'s blog on the creation of the restaurant: Starting a High-Profile New Restaurant After Closing Another An eGullet outing as part of the Chocolate & Confections Workshop in 2019 An eGullet gathering in St. Louis specifically to visit Bulrush And they've received some high accolades from the media: St. Louis Magazine: The best new restaurants in St. Louis 2019 The St. Louis Post-Dispatch: ★★★½: At Bulrush, Rob Connoley fashions a vital modern restaurant from Ozark traditions Sauce Magazine: Review: Bulrush in Grand Center Vice: How to Eat Your Way Through the Backwoods of the Ozarks The Riverfront Times: Bulrush Honors Often-Overlooked Ozark Cuisine I had the chance to revisit Bulrush this weekend to see what Rob was doing with his winter menu (it's December 2019 as I write this). Obviously I'm hopelessly biased, so this isn't really a review, just some comments on that experience. It's also a place for us to continue to post reports as more of us get to visit this St. Louis gem created by one of our own. No photos this time, so descriptions will have to do... Course 1: Purple hull peas, Fioriani cornbread, Sorghum custard, New season sorghum Served as a small cube of cornbread atop the custard, topped with the peas, at room temperature. Great cornbread and perfect peas, this was a great start. Course 2: Winter squash, Ricotta mousse, Pepitas, Onion ash I love pumpkin seeds, which added a great textural element to this dish, served as a ring of squash surrounding the mouse. I believe it was an acorn squash the night we were there. Course 3: Autumn olive foam, Lactose-caramelized pumpkin, Pumpkin caramel, Cocoa crisp Rob introduced this one as "last night's turd," which got some nervous laughs from our fellow diners. Apparently the dish had not worked on the previous day, so they had reworked it and were giving a revised version another go. It is presented as a cocoa crisp covering...something. You never do get to really see what's under there, and while most of the bites were good, if nondescript, a couple times I got huge pops of coriander, which tends to take over. So maybe some more work on this one... Course 4: Turkey mousseline, Cornbread crumb, Soured corn puree, Fermented hot sauce The ingredient list pretty much sums this one up: the mousseline was excellent, and the sour corn puree and homemade hot sauce were excellent accompaniments. Maybe the best dish of the night. Course 5: Roasted celery root, Saguaro apples, Pumpkin aguachile, Oxtail, Bok choy I love celery root, so of course I liked this one. I also thought that the complex combination of richness and acidity worked very well. I don't remember the bok choy at all, however! Course 6: Pork cheek, Grilled carrots, Whey-braised turnips, Turnip top emulsion, Apple demi-glace A much smaller "meat course" than last time, which I appreciated. I thought the turnips were a bit too salty, however, and the turnip top emulsion was sort of bland. Nice ideas, but this didn't come together for me. Intermezzo: Maple pawpaw amazake The only course with eating instructions, and judging from the coughing down the counter I'd guess even more instructions were probably needed! It's a liquid-filled sphere, which I think caught some of our dining companions off guard. Course 7: "Bolero" carrot cake, acorn miso rye butterscotch, Roasted pumpkin, Malted milk crumb, Fuilletine crepes My kind of desert: just a tiny bit of sweetness, with a terrific blend of flavors that all sequenced well.
  10. I hope you got some help with the cleanup! Everything looks fabulous.
  11. Seems like the batteries released some acid. After 3-4-whatever years batteries start to release acid, this causes problems with the contacts. For most cases it's not a problem since batteries need to be changed before that time, but I suppose you don't use your Thermapen for hours each day. There are plenty of tutorials on the internet on how to clean that acid, hopefully this will solve your problem. Teo
  12. OK my yearly baklava anxiety attack. People get so excited that I feel ridiculous pressure and I am normally Miss Calm Cool Collected. Nuts ground, syrup ready to boil, butter ready, oven pre-heating. I think the big stops for me are the cutting which I described to a friend today as "precision cutting of wet kleenex and getting syrup just right. A normal person would use a thermometer - but.. So... ready set go
  13. My mother, who canned everything, said she'd use non-regulation jars in things that don't need pressure canning, but just waterbath, so jams, jellies, pickles. Like others have said, I don't. I've had to clean up after a broken jar before. It ain't fun. Also, be sure to check the top rims of your jars for any cracks or chips. If they have either, discard them.
  14. liamsaunt

    Dinner 2019

    I have to say the same. Your dining room is beautiful! Tonight, chili-thai basil salmon with spinach and rice. From the anguished screaming I can hear on the other side of the house, it sounds like a New England Patriots loss is going to make for a bitter dessert for the football fans in my home. My football game territory in the house has Christmas carols and wine 🙂
  15. The workshop is closed for the season! Actually, it’s just closed until next Sunday, when I will do a much more toned-down version of this for one of my sisters who couldn’t make it today, her adult daughter, my sister who was here today, and her 10-year-old granddaughter. I don’t anticipate doing nearly the level of prep for that - and sadly @Kerry Beal won’t be joining us - but I am looking forward to it nevertheless. Meantime, here are the few pictures I was able to snap during the day. The crispy marshmallows and caramelized Rice cereal were a huuuuge hit and showed up in a lot of barks and clusters, so I suspect they will become staples in my repertoire. Lots of delicious things made all around!
  16. kayb

    Lunch 2019

    So glad to see Mousie back. He makes me smile.
  17. OK, if you take orders, I want a set of the trees. Just let me know how to acquire them. And you people are about to tempt me over the line into fancy chocolate making, and that is a step I do NOT need to take!
  18. My son brought this home yesterday. He said this isn't a joke but it is still funny. Cereal with no cereal in the box.
  19. "Fleabay." I love it. I'd venture that if the KA lasts another five years, or ten, and if you've returned the Magimix, you'll pay considerably more for it then than you just did. Also, there is the law of appliance failure that states that if you return the MM, the KA will die when you are in the middle of something critical you simply MUST complete. If you have storage room, a backup is not a bad thing, as many in this group will testify. I feel moderately uneasy about not having a backup CSO, but I DO have a backup coffee grinder, perhaps the most important small appliance I own.
  20. A bit of a mash up where I used the toppings from this Broccolini and Charred Lemon Flatbread on the Al Taglio Dough (50% bread flour + 50% stone ground, whole grain Glenn wheat flour) from Mastering Pizza. I had a lot less goat cheese than the recipe called for so I added some mozzarella midway when I turned the pan. I also blanched the lemon slices because of a previous and very bitter experience with lemon slices on a flat bread. Excellent flavor combo with roasted garlic purée, broccolini, sliced shallot and lemon, goat cheese and a bit of Parmesan.
  21. Erm, the fact these apples do not turn brown and their outlandish keeping qualities scream genetic engineering to me. Have fun with them, though. For me, I love a freshly farvested macintosh apple. To me that fresh macintosh, so crisp, so tart and so juicy is the very epitome of apples.
  22. Wow. Tough one. 1. Bacon 2. Strawberries 3. Pulled pork barbecue (when done right) 4. French onion soup 5. Cajun boiled shrimp with a very horseradishy cocktail sauce 6. Latkes with very runny egg yolks 7. Creme brulee 8. Berries with creme anglaise 9. Sliced vine-ripe tomatoes with salt 10. Lobster ETA 11. Castelvetrano olives
  23. My favorite posole article. I'd suggest using RG's hominy at least once - intense in the best way. https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1994-10-13-fo-49542-story.html
  24. Shelby

    Dinner 2019

    I say this every time I see your dining room. I adore it. Food looks great too.
  25. Foods of Flavor?? Foods? In no particular order... Buffalo Chicken Wings Oysters Sushi Sichuan Spicy Beef Noodle Soup Soup Dumplings Most Soups Roast chicken Roast Prime Rib of Beef Duck!!!! Lamb!!!! Blueberries Chocolate Lemon! Tabasco Rosemary and Thyme Doubajing (spelling) black bean paste Black Pepper Grainy, flaky salt Olive Oil Butter Bacon
  26. I bought copper canele molds yesterday and have seasoned them following Paula Wolfert's instructions. They are cooling in the oven. Yesterday I also bought food grade beeswax. I bought a piece the size of a regular muffin and it cost all of $1.75. For my first batch I am going to make Paula Wolfert's recipe. I have found others that I would like to try as well but that will be my starting point. I will make the batter up today and will try baking a couple tomorrow after the batter has sat for 24 hours. I found a good article on canelles while I was googling about them, here it is: https://tasteofartisan.com/canele/
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