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  2. I didn't. Although I'm the only one who uses the butter (the kid prefers margarine, the Philistine!), and I have no objection to crumbs in my butter. Still, a handy thing to know.
  3. kayb

    Dinner 2019

    Add me to the toasted rav fan line. At least before the celiac diagnosis. My kids can eat a boxful at a sitting. Interestingly, the Arkansas Delta has a sizeable Italian population, made up of descendants of immigrants in the 1920s-30s. I may have told the story of how they came here before; if not, and if anyone's interested, I will. But a consequence is that damn nearly every small Delta town has a reasonably decent Italian restaurant, mostly of the red-sauce workingman Italian variety, and many dishes that have been "italianized" from Southern classics, i.e., Fried chicken with marinara sauce Spaghetti as a veggie side to fried catfish (red sauce with no meat) and my personal favorite, a debris po'boy, shredded pot roast over a split small baguette, topped with marinara sauce and the classic barbecue spaghetti, pulled pork and a barbecue-flavored red sauce over linguine Toasted rav as the appetizer, naturally.
  4. It depends on the kind of leavened dough and the kind of leavener you are using. Working with levain / sourdough starter / natural leavener (whatever you call it, something that does NOT include saccharomyces cerevisiae) is one thing, because of all the different microbes involved. Working with commercial yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae) is another thing, because you are using only one kind of microbe. There are recipes which call for both, trying to get the best of both worlds. As a general rule, the shorter the fermentation time is, the less flavor is developed, the quicker the final product goes stale. Working with levain gives you much more flavor, because each different microbe produces different molecules with its metabolism, some of them help retarding the staling process, others are acids. Depending on the culture of the levain (the balance between the various microbes) and the fermentation process (temperature and time) the balance of the produced acids can be pretty different. Levain went through quite a number of previous fermentations, so it carries all the molecules produced before. Working with commercial yeast gives less flavor because you are using only a kind of microbe, and this microbe has a quicker metabolism. Pre-ferments (poolish, biga...) are used to prolong the fermentation time and thus develop more aromatic molecules. So the more fermenting passages you include in the recipe, the more flavorful the final result. There are recipes that call for a direct fermentation (mix, shape, proof, bake) in only one passage, that's the simplest way but you end up with a product with poor flavor and short shelf life (quick staling). When a recipe calls for both it's because in such way you get the flavor from the levain, but also the kick and predictability of the commercial yeast. Laminated doughs for viennoiseries (croissant, danish, laminated brioche and so on, remember that croissant, kouign amann, pain au chocolat, pain au raisins are like brothers) can be made in a variety of ways. You can use only levain, in which case you get great flavour, but fermentation times can vary a lot, plus the crust is not as flaky as when you use commercial yeast (with croissants you want the flakiest crust possible). You can use commercial yeast with the direct method, it's the quickest process with the most consistent results, but less flavor. You can use commercial yeast with a pre-ferment and then added commercial yeast in the final mix (laminated doughs call for strong activity), this way you get good flavor and a good compromise (this is the road followed by lots of professionals for croissants). You can use levain and commercial yeast (no pre-ferment, just the final mix) so you get great flavor and consistent fermentation times, problems are that it takes more work and you loose some flakiness for the crust. If you want to delve in the viennoiserie world then I would suggest to start with recipes that use only commercial yeast and call for a pre-ferment. Teo
  5. Never seen a really clear condom - though perhaps they exist.
  6. Are wild turkeys considered game? I mean these birds looked like ostriches in terms of weight. Most certainly. Turkey season begins this Saturday here in NJ and ends on 2 November. I have several friends headed out up in Morris County.
  7. I held off getting a Keurig for years because I didn't want to tie myself to pods (clogging the waste stream, not to mention the damn things are pricy, and what if you run out?). But when I learned one could get refillable cups and I could use my ground-at-home coffee I've used for years, I was off and running. A Keurig cup made from my Brazil Estate beans from Cafe Brazil in Dallas is the best cup of coffee I've ever made at home. My French press with the same coffee gets close. Coffee snobs' mileage may, of course, vary; my tongue just isn't that sensitive.
  8. No problem, it was going to the dump anyway. The film was apparently a decent professional one - I've poached in it before, but always very well wrapped. If I'd done the same here, you wouldn't have been able to see the phone. I might try a condom - I hadn't picked up on that before. I've done a second run, and it seems to be clearer (maybe I had starch residue in the bowl for the other one). It is an unappealing yellowish colour though - is leaf gelatin colourless as well as transparent? For this run, I've embedded a slate coaster which seems to be the approximate shape and mass of a smartphone, but square. I'll unmould it tomorrow and try buzzing a phone on top of it. Thanks for the idea! Even at the resonant vibration, I'm not entirely sure a small vibro-motor has enough power to collapse a jelly, but I'll take your word for it anyway. In any case, I'm very unlikely to achieve it without a lot of legwork. And I can't pull anything like a real vacuum with my set up, so it shouldn't be an issue.
  9. I have no authority other than the complete and utter loathing of kale (as well as all other greens; think of @rotuts and green bell peppers, which I loathe as well). This is a sacrilege, an abomination, and most likely a mortal sin. Mexican food should remain kale-less. I am indifferent to squiggles.
  10. Chiles Rellenos are common around here, and are always--always--made with poblanos. I've never seen Anaheims here, which I associate with California (possibly incorrectly). We have a large variety of fresh chiles but no Anaheims. In any case, you can use whichever chile appeals to you and is available in your supermarket. Some time ago I posted "My Spanish Teacher's Chiles Rellenos" in the RecipeGullet section: roasted, peeled poblanos stuffed with a thick piece of queso fresco, coated with a light batter made of separated eggs (whites whipped) and a little flour, slowly shallow fried in oil, drained on paper towels, and then finished in a thin tomato broth. Yes, it's a bit of a production, but you can do them in stages and then just finish them in the tomato broth for serving. In many ways they're almost better the next day, oddly enough. Served with white rice and beans. I also make a casserole version similar to the ones discussed above, and one for breakfast that's an egg and milk custard type that is very well received. But right now I really want the classic version! I have poblanos in the fridge but no queso fresco, so it will have to be tomorrow. I'll toast the chiles today and put together the rest tomorrow. Yum! Nancy in Pátzcuaro
  11. It was shaped. There is no difference if it's shaped or not: yeast activity is affected by freezing and defrosting, not by shaping. Teo
  12. If one of you can write the recipe (ingredient list and passages) then we could try. Teo
  13. Concept seems past its prime. No ads anymore...groupon offers appear.
  14. Apparently none are being returned to sender. Word is “very yummy” and I don’t tell you that to brag but to tell you that none of them in this group knew that these were gluten-free brownies. I suspect that they are one of the few things that lose very little in translation.
  15. Today
  16. You could prepare many bags, freeze them, store them in an airtight box, then pick up 1 or more when needed. Prepare 7 g bags, so if you want a 4 oz cup you use 1 bag, if you want a 8 oz cup you use 2 bags. Or 10 g bag for a 6 oz cup, whatever. Teo
  17. I'm sure it could, but I doubt I've ever done it before (I've always used Rumford baking powder in the past and it ONLY comes in a canister) and I actually liked these (the ones with double soda) better than any other chocolate chip cookies I've had before. LOL
  18. We can but laugh. Otherwise we'd all be in tears constantly at the chaos of our lives.
  19. To be clear, it's only with the JT recipe I have this issue. I'm going to try to make them one more time, and if they don't work out, I'll post up as a separate topic so I don't end up derailing this one Also.. maybe the baking soda thing is the reason why you don't like CCCs very much?! I would guess doubling the baking soda could lead to a slightly off taste.
  20. This week's episode is a road trip to Tijuana with Victor Delgado and Jorge Alvarez-Tostado, owners of Tacos 1986, now in downtown LA. The Times article includes a recipe for their Tacos al Hongo, vegan mushroom tacos and salsa macha.
  21. Same thing, different coffee, the booth next to me at a recent local tasting event had them too. Looks like Steeped has their own brand plus does the steep-able pouch packaging for others. https://steepedcoffee.com/
  22. Margaret Pilgrim

    Dinner 2019

    "Open a new window; open a new door...." Website says that Walmart carries them....
  23. Two this morning: "Ramen Obsession: The Ultimate Bible for Mastering Japanese Ramen" Kindle Edition $.99US Use the "Look Inside" feature to see the list of recipes. International recipes to bring everyone together... Lisa Soldo-Johnson's "It Begins at the Table: 140 recipes to inspire love for every nation, tribe, and tongue [Print Replica]" Kindle Edition $2.99US Use the "Look Inside" feature and scroll down to the first chapter's listing of recipes. I am a US Prime member and the price you see may vary.
  24. robirdstx

    Dinner 2019

    Thanks to @Kim Shook, I am now well stocked. Not only did my local Kroger have them, but they were on sale at only $2.99 each if I bought five. So I did! 😁
  25. SO, I just figured out that for awhile now (not sure exactly how long, but a fairly long time) what I've been using as and thought was baking powder is actually baking soda. All my life baking soda has come in a box and baking powder in a canister. This is a canister of baking soda. 🤪 What this means is the Jacques Torres cookies that I made so carefully and agonized about were made with NO baking powder and twice the amount of baking soda the recipe calls for. And now I don't know what to think. Why is my life like this?
  26. rotuts

    Dinner 2019

    " toast on 1 " got to !
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