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  2. You can see the type of commercial stuff they make by scrolling down and browsing some of the Restaurant Only items on this page (some of these items could be available at Saturday sales): https://www.hfcoors.com/restaurants-only/
  3. I've been to 3 or 4 of the HF Coors Saturdays. They can be quite busy at times, especially if they advertise certain types of items that will be discounted (on the website or in their email/newsletter). Some of their stuff is really popular and those are the days that people would start lining up really early. There are always some people there before opening, they usually know exactly what they want. It used to be that all of the featured sale items were put out first thing and that meant a real rush at opening, but they said they would start putting items out throughout the day. Not sure if they have followed that new policy or not. This video on the website gives an idea of the Saturdays: https://www.hfcoors.com/visit/ Also, they make a lot of commercial stuff (for restaurants and hotels, promotional items, etc) so lots of that stuff is available at the Saturday sales as seconds or as discontinued lines. They make lots of things other than the lines they sell in their retail shop.
  4. I've been finding that some flavors need more sweetness than others. Unsurprisingly, bitter flavors like cocoa need extra sweetness to compensate. But I'm also finding that fruit flavors don't taste quite right at my usual low sweetness level. It's a kind of balancing act ... similar to getting salt levels right in order to to pop flavors into focus.
  5. Nancy in Pátzcuaro

    Question about frozen mussels

    We have always loved mussels and just discovered a source for them here in nearby Morelia. However, they are frozen and I have no experience with frozen mussels. I assume you let them defrost and then check to see if any haven't opened as you would with fresh ones. Or can you steam them without thawing? I'm looking forward to inviting our French friends for moules and I don't want to poison anybody! Thanks for your help-- Nancy in Pátzcuaro
  6. ElsieD

    Dinner 2019

    Thanks. I have neither so I guess I'd best get to an Indian grocery store.
  7. Today
  8. Yes, I was aiming for the sweetness of 100 g of sucrose, with more freezing point depression. As it turns out more freezing point depression was not necessary. If I make this again (which I probably will because it is good and because I am lazy -- compared to custard the recipe is easy) I'd use 100 g sucrose. But I still like custard better!
  9. suzilightning

    Lunch 2019

    I'll see your rye and raise you marbled rye with turkey, aged provolone, bacon and miracle whip with a cranberry relish(Dickinson's).
  10. JoNorvelleWalker

    Dinner 2019

    Yes, I think the dish would work without black cardamom but black cardamom adds a little something. Besides, I needed a recipe to use up my bottle of black cardamom. Of the other spices on hand, I think grains of paradise would work.
  11. paulraphael

    Proper knife motion when cutting meat?

    If it's meat that's going to be cooked, it doesn't make a big difference; you probably won't be able to tell how artful the knife strokes were. If you're carving a roast, or if you just want maximum prep karma, then it's hard to go wrong sashimi-style knife strokes. Long blades are better than short. Sharp knives are better than dull (obviously) although for red meat and poultry you'll benefit from a less polished edge than you would for sashimi. The delicate flesh of fish will cut best (by far) with an edge polished on a 6000 to 10000 grit water stone. For poultry or red meat, a toothier edge will generally serve you better; like from a 1000 to 2000 grit stone, and possibly maintained on a steel. Both kinds of edge will cut meat like butter when fresh off the stones, but the toothier one will continue to cut meat well after many hours of use. and it can be banged back into shape several times before revisiting the stones. The cutting technique is to start with a short forward thrust that breaks the surface. This should end with the back edge of the blade over the back edge of the meat. Then complete the cut with a long, crescent-shaped drawing cut. At the end of the stroke, the front of the blade (just behind the tip) should be in contact with the cutting board, and should follow through all the way. It should cut clean through, and by this point, there will be very little blade surface area in contact with the meat, so nothing will stick to the knife. If you can't make the cut in one stroke, don't saw. It's the sawing motion that rips up the meat. Instead, remove all downward pressure, and move the knife forward again without cutting. Then repeat the crescent-shaped drawing motion. This way, all the cutting is one direction, and the cut will be clean and uniform.
  12. As Smithy mentioned, I have a recipe for pressure steaming eggs and potatoes together for potato salad (4 minutes, high pressure); the eggs come out with completely solid, pale yellow yolks. If you're after a softer, darker yolk, you could cut the time by a minute. That being said, despite all the eggs I've cooked in the Instant Pot, I find that steaming them without pressure gives the most reliable results. Under pressure (low or high), it seems that the tiniest variable can make a big difference in how they come out, and pressure cooking takes about the same time total as non-pressure steaming. I bring an inch or so of water to a boil, then add the eggs in a steamer basket and cover the pot. Thirteen minutes will give you completely set, pale yellow yolks; 10 minutes will result in softer dark yellow yolks (not runny).
  13. Happy Memorial Day! Happy indeed! Succeeded in Zone 6 to have ripe tomatoes before Memorial Day! Last year's goal was to have tomatoes before July 4th. With my DIY high power LED lights, Memorial Day is the objective for this year. Next year Mother's Day? :-) dcarch
  14. Kim Shook

    Greetings from Israel

    Welcome, Kasio! I'm looking forward to your contributions!
  15. mgaretz

    Dinner 2019

    "Roast" beef sandwich, raw carrots and potato sticks for dinner. Roast is in quotes because I actually cooked it SV, seared, then sliced after cooling.
  16. Further to the egg question: @JAZ's Instant Pot Obsession cookbook has a recipe for soft-boiled eggs. This may be closer to what you want? It says to use refrigerator-temperature eggs, put them on a basket above 1 cup of water (remember, you're steaming, not boiling them) and: The ice bath is just for about 30 seconds, so you can handle the eggs. The book also has a recipe for potato salad in which you cook the eggs and the potatoes together in the IP. 2" size red potatoes, quartered, share the steamer basket with the eggs. Put 1 cup water in the pot; select Steam / High; cook 4 minutes and then quick release. Again there's an ice bath for the eggs. I hope this all helps. Let us know what you do, and how it comes out! I may go make some potato salad myself on this fine sunny day.
  17. I haven't tried it myself, so I'm just giving you book-learning. Maybe someone with experience will post, but time's a-wasting for your day's potato salad. The Instant Pot cookbook that I mentioned just before your post says this about potatoes: Potatoes, large russet / quartered, for mashing: 4 minutes at High pressure; Natural release for 8 minutes, then quick release. Potatoes, red / whole if less than 1.5 inch across; halved if larger: 4 minutes on High pressure; quick release. I'd guess that the red potato treatment is closer to what you want for potato salad. For hard-cooked eggs she uses Steam, High pressure, quick release and then right into an ice water bath. This is for eggs right out of the refrigerator, but note that she isn't doing it on Low pressure so it isn't the same technique and I don't know how it would compare to what you're after. I'll dig around some of my electronic books and look for other information, in case nobody with experience posts here!
  18. They're beautiful! Thanks!
  19. Yeah, every home recipe I've seen (and most pro recipes) are way too sweet. I usually go for a sucrose-equivalent sweetness (POD) of around 120g/1000g. Trehalose has roughly 40% the sweetness of sugar (possibly less at low dilutions), so you had the equivalent of 98g sucrose / 750g, or a POD of 130. Sucrose and dextrose in combination also give lots of independent control over sweetness and freezing point.
  20. BonVivant

    Dinner 2019

    What I've been eating: A small but very thick piece of liver I ask the fishmonger to save all the roe for me (he even charges less than other fishmongers). In Lyon it costs about 30 euros per kilo. Ouch. I pay 1/3. All kinds of roe from flatfish and herring etc. Lightly dredged in flour and fried in duck fat. Seared salmon SV goat's leg.
  21. BonVivant

    Lunch 2019

    Smoked fish Cooked in cream is always nice when one does not have bbq weather (and it's almost June!). Rosette de Lyon because I have many hanging in the house. And I made a mess whilst transfering the eggs to the plate. Clumsy perfectionist.
  22. Darienne

    Greetings from Israel

    Glad to meet you, Kasio. eGullet is a good place to be.
  23. I found this, but unfortunately DE 95 powdered glucose is for all practical purposes dextrose powder, which I have plenty of sources for. I ended up buying this on Amazon, which is the right stuff but seems like a terrible deal.
  24. lemniscate

    Camping, Princess Style

    The bottoms are unglazed.
  25. lemniscate

    Camping, Princess Style

    The doors were open once we got there. Looked like an orderly line to get in and then shoppers disperse to about 20 separate shelf units to browse. It was very civilized as far as no grabfest, just wander and examine. Some bring a folding cart or wagon to put their items in. Otherwise you carry your items, no shopping carts provided. There were two separate check-outs, cash and credit, cash was the shorter line and my choice. HF Coors provides boxes and wrapping paper. I think we were there no longer than 30min total. I bet there were 100 people in the factory area shopping and there was plenty of elbow room. It may be busier in the winter months. May is when things slow down as far as winter visitors to Tucson.
  26. ElsieD

    Dinner 2019

    How crucial is the cardamom? Do you think I can use something else?
  27. I just can't believe it ! I mis-placed my iPot notebook ( red ) and therefore ask for a little help Id like to pressure steam eggs right out of the refrigerator , as I have don in the past on the Low Pressure setting hoping to get a white that is tender , and a yolk that is custard like I know some of you do this. and A High pressure steam in of New Potatoes cut into large chunks , in the basket above the 1 cup of water Time ? release ? a good day for potato salad here : going to over 80 ! many thanks
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