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  1. Past hour
  2. Drat! I should have spoken up sooner. At least they went to a good cause. 🙂
  3. JoNorvelleWalker

    Grocery Shopping

    In Shoprite's defense they did have one lorn bag of Key Limes on the shelf. And lemons they had lots.
  4. It depends on what has been deep fried in the oil. Oil for chips/fries, I will happily, filter, store in a covered metal pot which sits on the counter and re-use once or even twice. Oil used for fish or anything spicy, I dispose of after one use. I have a 5-litre old oil bottle under the sink and used oil is put there until full, then properly disposed of.
  5. Matthew.Taylor

    Confections! What did we make? (2017 – )

    Thanks for the honesty. Truthfully, I got some surprisingly good taste from the ganache. Diced Strawberries and cream overnight, and then sieved out seemed to work pretty well, but you're idea is interesting too, but wouldn't that put too much liquid in the ganache?
  6. Today
  7. JoNorvelleWalker

    Kitchen Remodeling

    Wine glasses in the dishwasher?
  8. Continuing the experiments: Heavy Cream 520 g Pistachio Paste 140 g Sugar 100 g Salt 3 g Locust Bean Gum 2 g Lambda Carrageenan 1.3 g Polysorbate 80 0.5 g Glycerol Monostearate 0.1 g Same ingredients as last time. Note that I reduced the salt to 3 g from 4 g; and the heavy cream this time was non-ultra pasteurized, without added emulsifiers and stabilizers. (And, no, the cream was not from Shoprite.) I heated the mix, minus pistachio paste, to 60C in a bain marie like so... I added the reserved pistachio paste and homogenized. Then I cooled the mix in an ice bath and refrigerated. The viscosity is noticeably less than the previous batch made with Shoprite cream. I won't know till I've spun and tasted it but I suspect the viscosity is still too high. At least this time the homogenizer could work through the mix without sounding like it was about to burn out. @paulraphael or anyone, do you have suggestions for how I could adjust the stabilizers? My ratios are those given for Modernist Pistachio Gelato (designed for water as the liquid, not for cream). https://modernistcuisine.com/recipes/pistachio-gelato-2/
  9. Yesterday
  10. ChocoMom

    Grocery Shopping

    I felt a little odd buying a gazillion lemons and limes this past week...I feel better knowing I wasn't the only one! Needed Key Limes for a ganache in the shop. Lime zest for the raspberry-lime diplomat cream (filling for one of tomorrow's desserts.); Lemons for my lemon meringue cheesecake; Lemon juice for the hollandaise sauce for tomorrow's pan roasted asparagus side. The glorious thing about it all, was that the lemons were on sale 2/$1 for 1 day this week, and I hit the store on that day. =) We're having 19 people for dinner tomorrow...so....needed ample desserts and sauce.
  11. so much for the moral high ground; it didn't occur to them to change it UNTIL they had a chance to make more money with it ....maybe she'll donate a percentage of the proceeds to addiction recovery services.
  12. Pastrypastmidnight

    Easter 2019: chocolates, confections, and baking

    They’re already gone! We used them as a bit of a fundraiser for my kids’ camp fees . Next time!
  13. Bernie

    Cooking plain old chips

    As a kid, the best chips were all double cooked. BUT after the first cook (just to heat them through, I think) you ALWAYS tightly wrapped them in newspaper. Half an hour later you just did a fairly quick deep fry. I think the wrapping in paper did 3 things. It held the temperature for much longer, it effectively steamed the chips to fully cook them and then it also removed any excess water. The "fat" we used was a fat pot on the stove specifically left there where all the excess fat from any frying or roasting of just about any meat added to the pot. The baking tray/frying pan was allowed to go cold and the set fat scooped off the top and added to the fat pot. The smell when it was heated was lovely, usually a cross between lamb/beef roast and fried sausages and chops. Unfortunately the authorities deemed the ink on newsprint to be bad for us and then we realized how unhygienic it really was to use newspaper. (you never bothered to wash your hands before reading the newspaper!) All the chips we brought at the local fish and chip shop were always double cooked. They would be cooked in bulk and then stored over or beside the deep fryer , sometimes for a day or 2. The advantage the fish & chip shops have is that they have huge fryers so the temperature doesn't drop much when they added the chips, unlike our home fryers with limited oil/fat volume. It might be worth par boiling the chips and allow them to dry before deep frying, if you only want to fry them once. I double fry them with the time in the middle initially in foil for half an hour then open the foil and put the lot in a warm oven to dry them out. I presently use canola oil but have tried some of the "specialist" deep fryer fats/oils but they generally have very limited life and don't seem to do any better.
  14. Dave the Cook

    Kitchen Remodeling

    Gimmick. We had one of these faucets installed during our recent remodeling (yes, I owe the membership the story of our travails), and had forgotten about this feature; luckily, it's not why we selected it. The problem is that in order to get that sexy balloon shape they show, you have to run the faucet at maximum pressure, and even then, only that center squirt does any appreciable work. At lesser pressure, the "balloon" doesn't form well, and it's almost as prone to splatter as the spray (and not as powerful; the center squirt is pretty wimpy). However, the spray function is excellent, and as Toliver says, only an amateur would make such a mess (ducks head in shame). ShieldSpray might be good for cleaning deep-bowl wine glasses that have sat around all night and have dried deposits in the bottom, but we haven't fully tested that theory, because the remodeling also included a terrific dishwasher. It's a great faucet, but don't buy it for this.
  15. There are many questions in your post, but at this point I will comment on this one. As long as you are using an airbrush up to about .5mm, a small compressor from one of the Iwata Jet series will work. Brushes like the .7mm Grex require something larger. When I bought the Grex, tech support recommended a 1HP compressor. At the time they had a special, and I got the 2HP for the same price, and I have not regretted that. The larger the nozzle, the more compressed air you need. In my setup, the compressor runs a while, then shuts off, which (I think) is a sign that it is producing enough air. I never have to wait for the tank to fill up. When I bought an inexpensive HVLP spray gun, however, all that changed--2 HP was not enough. The compressor ran constantly, which (as I understand it) is not good for a compressor. If I were doing it over (those famous words we all utter at some point), I would have "gone big" in the beginning rather than keep upgrading in little steps. Too large a compressor is not a problem. When you are spraying a dessert and have to stop to heat up the airbrush so frequently that you get frustrated, then you will know it's time to upgrade your spray gun. If you follow the path many of us on eGullet have followed, you will get hooked at some point on making something, whether it's entremets or chocolates, and then you will start looking for upgrades of both sprayer and air source. There is a lot of information in this thread on that subject.
  16. Ha! It was Target! ... https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/12/dining/christina-tosi-milk-bar.html
  17. @Pastrypastmidnight they all look beautiful and sound delicious. Would you please save a few spumoni macarons for me.
  18. Thanks @pastrygirl. This is really helpful. I think I'm going to give the .5 nozzle a go and see what happens.
  19. Pastrypastmidnight

    Easter 2019: chocolates, confections, and baking

    I’m still working on Easter, you know, since it’s 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, but in the meantime: Pastel macarons (coconut ganache with pineapple jam, milk chocolate passionfruit ganache, dark chocolate ganache, spumoni, dark chocolate with cherry jam, and pistachio cherry): Homemade peeps: Bonbons (lemon meringue, key lime, grapefruit, s’mores, and speculoos praliné): Cross your our fingers I can get my first ever big eggs filled and assembled and my first ever mini entremets/petits gateaux finished by tomorrow .
  20. heidih

    Cooking plain old chips

    There is also the type of potato. I came up with the basic Idaho Russet. Today it iss fancy pants potato selection. Might be affecting your result
  21. I bring an empty large (16 liter) oil container home from work. I dump the cooled oil in it, put the lid on and store it on the stairs to the attic (which are behind a door located in the kitchen). When it's full, I take it to work and leave it with the ones from work to be disposed of by whoever picks all that up and I take another empty home to start the process again. But I realize that's not an option for everybody.
  22. Tri2Cook

    Cooking plain old chips

    Yeah, most of this cooking stuff was a lot easier before we started figuring out all kinds of ways to make it more complicated. Now, instead of just cooking the chips like you used to, you have be precise with temps, use the right potatoes, use the right oil, use multi-frying techniques, etc. And somehow, knowing about all those things makes the old way of doing things suddenly not work anymore. I've always thought chips benefitted from a double cook but thinner cut chips do fine with a single cook. I don't really have much in the way of suggestions other than a double cook will definitely solve the excessively brown exterior/under cooked interior thing. I've tried the triple cook with the boiling first and didn't think the results were worth the extra effort over what I get from a double cook in the fryer.
  23. Fof

    Cooking plain old chips

    This may seem, and almost probably is, a daft question, but I need help. As a kid, I am now 74, my mother, and myself later, just cut the chips, threw then in the basket and lowered it into HOT dripping (Always being VERY careful the pan didn't boil over. Happened.) Now, all I get are chips that are excessively brown on the outside, and not fully cooked in the middle. Yeukkk!!! I now have a deep fryer, set to 180C, as all web recipies state, and checked with an IR thermometer. Never attempts to boil over, so is therefore at a lower temp then previously. Raising the temp just makes the chips worse. Checking the web tells me how to double and triple cook them, and even shallow frying them. Any and all ideas and suggestions are being asked for. HELP!! Fof
  24. heidih

    Easter Menus

    Minimalist here for just a few. who care little about tradition. Egg/pea salad on toast points or with corn tortilla chips freshy made and split pea soup with a roasteed lamb stock base (simmering now). . Lemon bars for tea/coffee.
  25. Serioyus Eats addrressed the issue the other day probably for Passover frying. . Hopefully our master fry folki like @Shelby and @HungryChris If done properly your food should be crisp and not oily. If you measure before and af6ter there shoud be only a slight difference, https://www.seriouseats.com/2019/04/how-to-dispose-of-cooking-oil.html
  26. JoNorvelleWalker

    What do people do with oil used for deep frying?

    If you want my honest answer: I spill it on the counter. Some goes on the floor.
  27. My mum used to store the deep fry pot (with oil) on a shelf in the kitchen, and then reuse it. I now imagine that I would find the taste of the old oil off-putting. I can't remember when I last did any deep frying. Also, of course, deep fat frying is probably unhealthy. Are people satisfied with the "air fryer" alternatives?
  28. 2 thihgs: I can share that when I intervuewed at the HQ it was made absolutely clear that customer serviice is a priority. They will find out for you. 2 - Yes suun dried. Check out this older eG blog from Turkey. https://forums.egullet.org/topic/96590-eg-foodblog-sazji-istanbul-glutfests/
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