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  1. Past hour
  2. Interesting. I read that it came into Europe through the Ottoman Empire and Muslim North Africa, and was for a long time held to be heretical by the Church. This is how we get the image of the devil with a fork.
  3. I break a lot of food "rules" because who cares! It's MY kitchen, MY food and MY rules - which are No rules. I break spaghetti, linguini, etc., into lengths that I like and I use a "Pasta Boat" to cook pasta in the microwave. I've been cooking and baking for 70 years because I started when I was ten and many, many years ago I learned that some of the classic "rules" are simply BS.
  4. Today
  5. I think @eugenep tried at least three recipes. Nevertheless, Diana Henry is highly regarded and if you do a search here you will find a number of us have cooked from her books with much success. But to each their own and perhaps Eugene did not find the recipes he tried to his taste.
  6. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    Literally 20 meters around the corner from our hotel was a bar called Bond. I kid you not. It’s a standing bar, no seats, just small tables to lean against with very fresh and tasty snacks. It became our regular, being such a handy spot to stop for a cleansing ale after a long day touring around. We got stuck here a few times. Shared sashimi platter Tempura whitebait and cant remember vegetable. Tempura prawn, squid and pickled ginger In my best Scottish brogue....Bond, bar Bond.
  7. sartoric

    Tasting Japan

    The market in Kyoto was larger and even more crowded than Kanazawa, with many more foreign tourists ignoring the “Do not eat and walk”. You are supposed to eat whatever you bought, at the stall you bought it from, even if that means standing in a tight space. We returned to this market more than once. Tasty things on sticks Pickled everything (taken before I noticed the no photos sign, apologised profusely, accepted gracefully). There are hundreds of restaurants within the market precinct. We chose this one, udon noodles with tempura prawns for me Chicken with noodles and leeks for him On a subsequent visit fried bean curd Someone got to try a fresh sea urchin, $20 well spent, you can taste the ozone. Matcha ice cream, love this.
  8. Wow, that looks perfect to me. Just out of the oven. Four baguettes and one little bun from the other half of the dough that I hand-mixed up yesterday. Half for the pizzas and half for baguettes.
  9. And I would never judge a book by one recipe.
  10. eugenep

    Lunch 2019

    looks good. did you make the hamburger buns from scratch? and is it like a quick bread (without yeast fermentation) or was is fermented with yeas (which gives it most of its flavor I'm guessing???)
  11. Whatever you enjoy and however you enjoy it is fine with you, me, us. I remember walking into my first apartment, looking at the refrigerator, cupboards and stove and thinking, "Wow! I can buy anything I want, cook anything I want, eat anything I want!" A freedom I had never realized before. And it's still true. No food Nazis in my house, nor should there be in yours!
  12. I was reading today in the NY Times that Sommaroy, a Norwegian island, is campaigning to abolish time and become the "world's first 'time-free' zone". After all, people were probably baking lefse long before kitchen timers.
  13. That's fantastic - I've bookmarked it! Thank you for linking it. BTW - my broken in half spaghetti twirls just fine. 😉
  14. Margaret Pilgrim

    Dinner 2019

    When I get a grip on unintended rotation, I'll PM you. Otherwise, just post as you do. Your plates look great!
  15. gfweb

    Dinner 2019

    I tried @Smithy roasted cauliflower. But I didn’t have sesame paste. So I used dark miso. And added harissa. Very nice. Probably nothing like the original. But nice. Can’t wait to try the real thing.
  16. Proper torque along with bending moment is an art form. Chop Sticks for retrieval under any method other than the fork knife cross hatch.
  17. weinoo

    Lemon posset

    I don't really measure - just reduce for 10 minutes, and it's close enough.
  18. robirdstx

    Dinner 2019

    Morgan City Combo at Floyd’s - Grilled Catfish and Shrimp with Asparagus
  19. TdeV

    Dinner 2019

    @Smithy's Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini was delicious! Even though I've never coated cauliflower before so I had no idea about proportions or how much sauce to make. I stuck my finger in it to see what it tasted like and thought it was boring, so I added more harissa. Oh là là! This image is rotated (it's not rotated on my computer). Help? Also fresh pasta and tomato sauce. (Also rotated)
  20. chefmd

    Dinner 2019

    Outstanding fresh scallops from WF with very pedestrian beans. Time to order more beans from @rancho_gordo
  21. We should note that in our present foodie world of "this" prepared like "that", I see Middle East seasoned spreadables called "hummus" frequently. White bean hummus. Carrot hummus. Beet hummus. Chefs and caterers are constantly scratching for catch phrases that will help sell product. Of course it is unsettling. To some, off-putting. But all part of food merchandising, whether restaurant or cookbook author. Consider many of the original signature dishes at French Laundry. Chicken liver mousse seasoned with tahini et al. Sounds a little rich. With cumin, parsley and garlic, well, perhaps.
  22. Yesterday
  23. Sorry, I had meant to respond earlier, hopefully you're still around. I make a lot of bars and have had that issue. I think it's just the nature of the beast that a flat layer of chocolate will curl as it contracts. My approach is to work quickly and in batches so the bar is filled and completed before the first layer has fully released from the mold. Once the bottom layer of chocolate is set, I invert the molds onto parchment and let them fully crystallize and release (in the fridge this time of year). Then i just lift the molds off when I'm ready to wrap the bars. But say I'm making 40 molds worth of bars ... I have 40 molds but if I shelled them all then filled them all then capped them all it would take too long and the first layer would start to curl. Instead I shell 6 or 8, fill and cap all those, then do 8 more and by the time they're done the first batch is ready to pop out and I can re-fill those molds. I used to make a caramel bar for which I would make a soft caramel, cool it in a thin layer, cut it into strips, lay a strip into each bar shell, then bottom. It worked well enough with my old molds. I think your main misstep was waiting overnight.
  24. Margaret Pilgrim

    Lemon posset

    You'll do. Many thanks. Question: Rather than measure and remeasure the cream as it reduces, could you instead measure 2 cups water into your pan to see where 2 cups would come in that pan, then just reduce the cream to that level? It seems to me that you would lose a fair amount of cream in the measure each time even if using a rubber spatula to return it to the pan. Besides, I'm lazy.
  25. TdeV

    Chicken liver hummus

    Well @chappie, did you try it? The curious want to know!
  26. Actually, in my neck of woods the widepread use of forks is attributted to 15th century Croatian mercenaries carrying it to the French royal court (similar to what is now considered to be a necktie)... But spaghetti, on the other hand, have gained popularity in industrialization era (mid 18-hundreds)- nothing to do with forks, but with means to mass produce. i.e. extrude, wheat pasta. Completely off the topic, I like spaghetti broken in half- that way they get rolled around the fork perfectly in a bite sized piece. As for usual "dos" and "don'ts", I've learned to ignore all advice that seems contradictory to my common sense... except when it comes to using wine/alcohol to tenderize or braise meat. I've learned it the hard way that the proper way is to burn off alcohol prior to using it beecause it will, otherwise, hinder the meat getting tender.
  27. weinoo

    Lemon posset

    I think you might be referring to moi. From Cook's Illustrated - April, 2016 LEMON POSSET WITH BERRIES SERVES 6 This dessert requires portioning into individual servings. Reducing the cream mixture to exactly 2 cups creates the best consistency. Transfer the liquid to a 2-cup heatproof liquid measuring cup once or twice during boiling to monitor the amount. Do not leave the cream unattended, as it can boil over easily. 2 cups heavy cream 2/3 cup (4 2/3 ounces) granulated sugar 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest plus 6 tablespoons juice (2 lemons) 1 1/2 cups blueberries or raspberries 1. Combine cream, sugar, and lemon zest in medium saucepan and bring to boil over medium heat. Continue to boil, stirring frequently to dissolve sugar. If mixture begins to boil over, briefly remove from heat. Cook until mixture is reduced to 2 cups, 8 to 12 minutes. 2. Remove saucepan from heat and stir in lemon juice. Let sit until mixture is cooled slightly and skin forms on top, about 20 minutes. Strain through fine-mesh strainer into bowl; discard zest. Divide mixture evenly among 6 individual ramekins or serving glasses. 3. Refrigerate, uncovered, until set, at least 3 hours. Once chilled, possets can be wrapped in plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to 2 days. Unwrap and let sit at room temperature for 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with berries and serve.
  28. A longtime eGer is known for making an amazing posset. I have lost his instructions and, worse, access to them. I'm hoping that, reading this, he will respond and contribute here. While a year round treat, it seems particularly timely as a light summer dessert. Please?
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