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  1. Past hour
  2. kayb

    Dinner 2020

    My eating habits of late have been pretty abysmal, so I undertook to cook myself something quick and relatively healthy tonight. A hamburger patty with a liberal application of A-1 sauce, and a baked sweet potato with a significant amount of Kerrygold butter.
  3. Almost a month and looking a lot more like a salad, albeit an expensive one.
  4. Dear Gorkreg I am so sorry I never saw your question. I wish my response could have been more timely. So what did you do that day? I hope you used the greens you had found. Perhaps you did. And? What did the saag taste like? I too find that you don’t always get all the greens or even spices for that matter, that were used traditionally. So I try to ‘mix-match’ as you will. Recently, I did make sarson ka sag, so I can post some of my pictures too. This is a picture of the mustard greens I grew in a pot. Will you be surprised if I told you how? I just planted some of the Indian black mustard seeds from my spicebox around end of Nov, and they grew! In January I had a crop of mustard greens. I plucked the smaller leaves for salad and then in a sunny week, suddenly the flowers came on. So I attempted to use the flowers and the leaves for saag! It worked! My recipe for saag includes mustard leaves, small mustard flowers, hardly any stems. Plus spinach leaves. Plus finely chopped onions, garlic, ginger, green chillies. Plus salt, dry mango powder, black salt, and ghee. Stirfry all the leaves in a tiny bit of ghee till wilted. Then separately fry onions and other ingredients. Add the wilted greens and puree. Cook on a very low flame for about an hour. Then add the black salt and dry mango powder. Serve with chapati roti or naan and plenty of ghee. Not a diet recipe in any way. I’m sure your recipe turned out superb as well. Bhukkhad
  5. Owtahear

    Dinner 2020

    My girl Avery is dreaming of those oxtails.
  6. heidih

    Dosa

    That is a great video @Bhukhhad Thank you. The dosa at my shop is like the first one. Already crisped up before filling the middle and more like something to pick up. Being in California - I'd say more "taco" style.
  7. Anna N

    Dosa

    Yep. We pride ourselves on doing things the hard way and being contrary as often as we possibly can. It is what keeps us separate from the rational world. 😂
  8. chefmd

    Lunch 2020

    Tuna with roasted carrots. Salsa verde not shown.
  9. Today
  10. Bhukhhad

    Dosa

    I loved how you said ‘besides this is egullet’!! yes of course best when made by one’s own hands. ❤️ All I can say is you have done all the things I could think of. And admittedly this is not my forte. They say experience makes it to perfection. So my friend, enjoy lots of dosas on your way and you will certainly get there soon. Bhukkhad
  11. @Bhukhhad thank you. Yes, my dosa looked like a very thin crepe, about 10 inches in diameter. I ladled the batter and spread the batter in a circle using the back of the ladle. After a couple of minutes I added the filling and rolled the dosa. But the spatula I was using was not very wide and the dosa ripped as I tried to roll it. I consulted many dosa recipes, including Modernist Bread. The recipe I was most closely following was this one: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/aug/25/keralan-onam-festival-feast-recipes-masala-dosa-vivek-singh-a-cooks-kitchen Some time ago our library hosted a dosa making course and I was trying to follow the technique I remember the presenter demonstrating. She used a non-stick electric griddle, as did I. Actually what I used was a crepe maker. She did not fill her dosa however. That may have made a difference. Possibly I used too much filling, or I added the filling too soon. I am aware store-bought dosa batter exists. A friend who makes dosa frequently recommended against using it. She said her children would not eat her dosa when she tried the store-bought batter. Besides, this is eGullet.
  12. Anna N

    Dinner 2020

    Beef with broccoli – – another interpretation.
  13. Bhukhhad

    Dosa

    36 hours for fermentation? Hmm I would say thats true in this winter weather. But you have to be careful with urad dal. Too much standing time for fermentation and it tends to go ‘off’. I dont know if you have the luxury to buy ready made batter. In the part of the world that I live in, we get ready to eat dosa and idli batter. Its a life saver for me. I don’t need to plan three days ahead nor keep batter in my fridge. I buy the day I want to make whatever. Shasta brand idli and dosa batter is really very good. It is available in the Indian store. I have not looked for it on Amazon. But one never knows. Or try Shasta’s website. I am afraid if I switch out of this screen to look for the links, I will misplace this spot. So I will let you consult the google search and find a way to see this batter in reality once. Then you will always get the consistency right. Best wishes! Dosa is so yummy! And sambhar is even more so Bhukkhad
  14. Bhukhhad

    Dosa

    JoNorvelleWalker No, this is not the right way to have dosa. I’m sure it tastes nice though. Let’s see. The first thing is that it should LOOK like a very thin crepe. And it is to be spread pretty much like we would spread a crepe. 1. cast iron very very flat skillet or dosa tava+ seasoned. 2. Well heated 3.Batter should be perfect. 4. Pour a ladleful in the center and Immediately swirl with the flat back portion of the ladle to spread in a circular fashion on the tava. It should be uniformly thin. 5. Pretty soon the sides of the dosa should start to turn upwards because they are ‘done’ 6. you can fold like an omelette or roll like a crepe. Now I too grew up in the north of India so chapati and paratha or Poha are my familiar dishes. Dosa I still get right only sometimes. So you are doing very well! But if you want to see a chef making dosa, have a look at Wah Chef. He is a south indian chef and his recipes are pretty authentic. Just like Bhavna’s recipes are authentically gujarati. Bhukkhad
  15. Last night was my first attempt at dosa: Tasted fine but the presentation left a bit to be desired. Any suggestions for rolling dosa or should I just fold the dosa over like an envelope? As may be seen the dosa fell apart while rolling and plating. Also it took 36 hours or so to get good fermentation. Is this OK?
  16. When I placed my Prime Now Whole Foods order this afternoon the delivery map showed the items were coming from an unexpected location nearer to me than the usual Whole Foods Market. Is the map broken or has amazon opened something new?
  17. Duvel

    Dinner 2020

    I don’t see why not ... let me take some !
  18. rotuts

    Dinner 2020

    @Duvel Cheeks ? nice I don't suppose any pis of the butcher shop might be posted ?
  19. Duvel

    Dinner 2020

    To be honest - I don’t know. But next week ox cheeks are on offer and I will return and get my share 🤗 I will ask ...
  20. I didn't think so but I see my comment has caused untold confusion.
  21. It's actually pretty easy to avoid that. It was a little slower than the flood and scrape method initially but I've done it enough now that it's almost as fast and probably faster overall if you account for cleanup. Even if it's still a little slower, it's a price I'm willing to pay to avoid some cleanup. In a well equipped chocolate kitchen with all the big machines that make life easier, it would probably be less helpful... but that's not the environment I'm currently working in.
  22. Thanks! I was wrong about their not being a protruding sensor. Never looked at it that closely.
  23. I put my Paragon by the window in hopes of illustrating this. Without the mat, the surface is perfectly smooth: The mat is flexible and hopefully, you can see that the sensor in the middle does actually sit just slightly proud of the surface when there is no pan to press it down: My 1 qt All Clad saucier, which has a fairly heavy handle can be a little tippy on this surface when empty. As I've used it more, this seems to be less of an issue. Maybe the mat has gotten less stiff than when brand new? I dunno. Edited to add: @CanadianHomeChef, thanks for all your contributions to this thread and the table of temps you linked to in the first post. I can't afford a Control Freak but am just delving into this topic for tips I can use with my bargain Paragon and appreciate your input!
  24. Welcome. You should find no lack of suggestions and ideas here. Lots of excellent chocolatiers in this group.
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