Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Margaret Pilgrim

    Cornbread

    I'd come for lunch...
  3. Today
  4. robirdstx

    Dinner 2019

    Vietnamese-style Grilled Pork Tenderloin on a Salad of Romaine, Mint, Cilantro and Cucumber (dressed with homemade Dipping Sauce) and sliced Tomatoes
  5. Yesterday
  6. weinoo

    Dinner 2019

    No, just hoarders.
  7. Last year I found out the trick to get artichokes to blossom in my zone 6. This year with my DIY high power LED grow light, I am hopeful that I will have even better results. As of today, things look promising. dcarch
  8. Margaret Pilgrim

    Dinner 2019

    Only a licked clean soup-plate could be more descriptive.
  9. Margaret Pilgrim

    Dinner 2019

    You do boarders?
  10. Today's find: From 2010, finalist for the James Beard Foundation Book Award and the IACP Cookbook Award, Robert L. Wolke's "What Einstein Told His Cook: Kitchen Science Explained" Kindle Edition $2.99US The recipes (not sure how many) illustrate chemical properties and why things work the way they do in cooking/baking. I am a US Prime member and the price you see may vary.
  11. Captain

    Dinner 2019

    Ham & Cauliflower soup. I used the cauliflower instead of split peas for Keto reasons.
  12. Captain

    Cornbread

    We only have Polenta in Oz and I have often thought of giving it a blitz to get it a little finer. This is my cornbread recipe and love it. The family doesn't so much so I'll be looking at some of your choices.
  13. It's the musky scent of rotting flesh wrapped around my shoulders...but thanks The media sure loves that pic. Drives me crazy simply from a health code perspective.
  14. weinoo

    Dinner 2019

    A few dinners that have stacked up... Brought this home from Pop+Dutch: So this was dinner the night we came home from Provincetown: My standby Roman: Mezze rigatoni all'amatriciana. Also meant a frittata the next morning for breakfast 😋. Then I went all Spanish/Basque: Ensalada de Judias Blancas. White beans (RG's fancy ones) with tomatoes, olives, onion, parsley, olive oil, wine vinegar, etc. Along with: Ensaladilla Rusa. Potato, vegetable, and tuna with capers, green olives, mayo, etc. I need to order in go out to dinner soon. This is 3 nights in a row.
  15. I definitely second what PG is saying. Order from your competitors. Or better yet, if they have a semi-open kitchen, go there and order and then watch their process. You can always ask innocent questions as a "customer". Most counter workers (from my experience), are unaware when a "customer" is asking probing questions. You are just a curious customer, killing time, by talking about cookies.
  16. Quick trip down to Buffalo today to start firming up the plans for the next workshop and to have lunch with @patris. We were headed for an Bangladeshi restaurant - Qutoom Indian and Indochinese Cuisine - but apparently they operate on island time and the times listed on the door were just a suggestion! So we headed next door to Frank Gourmet Hotdogs. A vegetarian Impractical Joker for @patris, standard with mustard and relish for me, elote and some very lovely fries to share.
  17. There is a procedure called "rigenerazione" in Italian, literal translation is "regeneration", don't know which is the correct translation in English. I don't even know if there is a term, never seen this process described in any English book. It just consists in reheating a cooked dough in the oven. You bake a good amount of cookies, store them in some place, then "regenerate" the required amount. You just need to put them in a 180°C / 350°F oven for about 3-5 minutes (depends on the oven, the cookie size and so on). Cookies get warm and almost as freshly baked. So you can cook a big batch only once during the day, then rewarm if needed and following requests. Teo
  18. If you start from apples then you will taste them in the background. Apples have a mild and neutral taste, ginger and lemon are strong and overpowering. You don't risk to get something that tastes of apples and ginger and lemon, you'll get something that tastes of ginger and lemon, plus a bit of apple in the background (most people won't even notice it). Besides this, you can adapt it to your taste, just add enough ginger and lemon until it tastes just like you want. This is said if you choose the apple way. If you want to minimize your work, then the recipe suggested by Jim is the best choice. So it's just up about your priorities. I would suggest to taste and adapt it following your taste, instead of following a given recipe. The intensity of ginger and lemon can vary quite a bit, being them strong flavours it's always better to taste and adapt, instead of following given quantities. You are the only one that knows the taste you are aiming for. Teo
  19. Please call it "charlotte", it's one of the most traditional desserts in classic French pastry. It went out of fashion in modern pastry shops, but it deserves to be rediscovered. Teo
  20. I've always used locally ground organic rye and have never had an issue with mold. @ElsieD, I think I have mentioned before that I'm not really a fan of sourdough bread. Both Moe and Matthew like it. I actually prefer the bread I make using just a biga with yeast. But I don't want to let the starter die. So when I feed the starter, I just toss some of the excess into a batch of dough with 3 or 4 grams of yeast. This way they get a mild sourdough flavour, one that I am okay with.
  21. For Father’s Day, I decided to try a Strawberry Ladyfinger Icebox Cake from Tasteofhome.com. I had some trouble with it and am still not sure was worth it. The springform pan lined with ladyfingers: All layered up with strawberries, mascarpone, and whipped cream. This layering is where I got into trouble. The ingredients list the strawberries as “6 cups fresh strawberries, sliced”, which SHOULD mean “measure out 6 cups of strawberries and then slice them”. That really is a bad direction. Strawberries can be all kinds of sizes – huge or as small as a thimble. I decided to prep the mascarpone/whipped cream portion and prep as many strawberry slices as seemed correct. That worked fine. But I was so freaked out about that that I think my attention wandered while I was doing the layering. The layering is supposed to go: ladyfingers, creamy layer, strawberries, creamy layer, strawberries, ladyfingers, creamy layer. I somehow missed the final ladyfinger layer. I was expressing my confusion and fears on the “absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions” thread here and everyone was sharing my frustration at the strawberry measurement issue. We were a bit worried that the lack of one of the ladyfinger layers would affect the stability, but it was actually fine: It was good. And impressive looking. But I guess I thought it would be kind of spectacular tasting and it just wasn’t.
  22. They certainly don't keep as long as salami or cheeses. Under optimal conditions in the fridge (i.e. not left out too long on the counter before putting back in the fridge), a week or two at the most. But smoked salmon freezes nicely.
  23. Margaret Pilgrim

    Beef heart

    I would tend to go French (https://www.europeancuisines.com/france-french-beef-heart-in-red-wine-with-smoked-bacon-onions-and-garlic) Italian (http://www.cliffordawright.com/caw/recipes/display/bycategory.php/recipe_id/627/id/37/) Spanish...sub heart in this robust stew (https://honest-food.net/spanish-chilindron-stew/) Hungarian (https://countingsheep.typepad.com/amuse_bouche/2004/02/hungarian_gulya.html) neo-Greek (https://barerootgirl.com/nourish/2014/11/20/mediterranean-beef-heart-stew/)
  24. I have not used applesauce for this purpose. I believe the idea is that it does not change the flavor, but I myself would go with Pomona's and not be concerned with other pectin sources.
  25. kayb

    Cornbread

    I've used corn meal in place of polenta. I would suspect you could blitz polenta in a blender or food processor and it would make decent cornmeal. Or use it as it is.
  26. I like the idea of the pre-made applesauce, certainly cuts down on the work I have to do. Does the flavor of apple come through? I haven’t worked with it much before but I don’t want the jam to taste of apple.
  27. Yes, the required calcium comes in the Pomona's box. I don't have any experience using natural pectin (except when it happens by accident with the fruit I am using at the time). I see that Teo (in a following post) has provided lots of details on that subject. If you want to use apples (which is what the Boiron recipes and others call for) but don't feel like making your own applesauce, you can buy it under brands such as Superpomme (mentioned by Peter Greweling in Chocolates & Confections). One of the positive features of Pomona's is that it is quite forgiving. If jam/jelly/marmalade is completely done and cooled but isn't as thick as you like, you can heat it again and boil it a bit longer (though there is a limit on how long).
  28. If you want something firm without using powdered pectin, then a good solution is using apples. You can start from apple puree, add immediately some lemon juice to limit oxidization (and browning), then add sugar (half the weight of the starting apple puree). Then add grated ginger, lemon juice and lemon zest to suit your tastes (remember the jam will reduce while cooking, so the final taste will be more concentrated than at this stage). Then cook to 105°C until the jam reached gelification point. Keep an eye to the pot and stir when needed to avoid scorching. As said before in the thread, better putting the seeds (both lemon and apple) in a tea ball and cook them with the jam, to add pectin; crush the seeds for them being more effective. If you plan to use this for a cake, then you can add small dices of candied ginger when you are building the cake. If you can avoid cooking them then better. If you need to put the jam in mason jars for future use, then you can add the candied ginger at the last minute during the cooking phase. To prepare apple puree: buy your preferred apples, peel and core them (keep the cores for the seeds), add some lemon juice, then blitz them with a hand blender until you get a puree. Teo
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...