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Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 1)

Confections Chocolate Cookbook

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#121 Kerry Beal

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 02:23 PM

In the recipes that use purees, it is always stated to reduce the puree by half. I assume the weight given is after the puree is reduced? Has anyone made any of these to varify this assumption?

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I think Luis has.

#122 sote23

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 11:44 PM

yes, the weight that is used is after reducing it down. I had the same question when I looked at some of the recipes. Let us know, how it turns out for you.

Luis

#123 mrose

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 01:50 PM

yes, the weight that is used is after reducing it down. I had the same question when I looked at some of the recipes. Let us know, how it turns out for you.

Luis

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I tried the pear ganache recipe. I started really late so I didn't temper the chocolate (I assumed this step is to help extend shelf life). It said to let it sit out overnight to set. In the morning it was still much too fluid so I out it in the frig. It set up & formed a skin on top. After putting a foot on, I turned it over to cut. But it was still much to soft. I doubt this is not due to not using tempered chocolate. Has anyone tried one of the recipes of this variety? Was the ganche firm enough to cut? I will try one of these again but will probably cut down the liquid content to get a firmer ganache. The chocolate is 63% of the weight and liquid added was 37%. I was going to lower the liquid portion to ~30%.

The ganache filled the size frame with not really any room to spare. If you want an alternative to getting bars (and you will not need to even the surface with a spatula), look at the adjustable cake square from Pastry chef. It will allow you to easily cut the recipe in half or make a full size protion with the same form.

Mark
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#124 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:04 PM

yes, the weight that is used is after reducing it down. I had the same question when I looked at some of the recipes. Let us know, how it turns out for you.

Luis

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I tried the pear ganache recipe. I started really late so I didn't temper the chocolate (I assumed this step is to help extend shelf life). It said to let it sit out overnight to set. In the morning it was still much too fluid so I out it in the frig. It set up & formed a skin on top. After putting a foot on, I turned it over to cut. But it was still much to soft. I doubt this is not due to not using tempered chocolate. Has anyone tried one of the recipes of this variety? Was the ganche firm enough to cut? I will try one of these again but will probably cut down the liquid content to get a firmer ganache. The chocolate is 63% of the weight and liquid added was 37%. I was going to lower the liquid portion to ~30%.

The ganache filled the size frame with not really any room to spare. If you want an alternative to getting bars (and you will not need to even the surface with a spatula), look at the adjustable cake square from Pastry chef. It will allow you to easily cut the recipe in half or make a full size protion with the same form.

Mark

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Greweling uses a different method for piped vs slab ganaches, and seems to be suggesting if you follow the correct technique that it will set up firm enough. I think we need to play a little.

#125 mrose

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 03:38 PM

yes, the weight that is used is after reducing it down. I had the same question when I looked at some of the recipes. Let us know, how it turns out for you.

Luis

View Post


I tried the pear ganache recipe. I started really late so I didn't temper the chocolate (I assumed this step is to help extend shelf life). It said to let it sit out overnight to set. In the morning it was still much too fluid so I out it in the frig. It set up & formed a skin on top. After putting a foot on, I turned it over to cut. But it was still much to soft. I doubt this is not due to not using tempered chocolate. Has anyone tried one of the recipes of this variety? Was the ganche firm enough to cut? I will try one of these again but will probably cut down the liquid content to get a firmer ganache. The chocolate is 63% of the weight and liquid added was 37%. I was going to lower the liquid portion to ~30%.

The ganache filled the size frame with not really any room to spare. If you want an alternative to getting bars (and you will not need to even the surface with a spatula), look at the adjustable cake square from Pastry chef. It will allow you to easily cut the recipe in half or make a full size protion with the same form.

Mark

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Greweling uses a different method for piped vs slab ganaches, and seems to be suggesting if you follow the correct technique that it will set up firm enough. I think we need to play a little.

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I was planning on trying again. I just have to plot out my next move. I added a bit more chocolate to gananche & if it firms up enough, I 'll use it for truffles. If not for some molded chocolates. I need to make some samples anyway.
Mark
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#126 choux

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 05:01 PM

How does it taste?

#127 mrose

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Posted 09 June 2007 - 05:15 PM

How does it taste?

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It had a very subtle taste, you might not even know it was pear if not told. I would probably add more puree next time.
Mark
www.roseconfections.com

#128 Rhubarb

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 11:02 AM

My experience is that a tempered chocolate sets up much faster than an untemepered chocolate in the same recipe--I've sometimes heated a batch too much and had to wait 2-3 days before the consistency settled to the firmness I'd expected.

#129 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 11:29 AM

I'm making the Dark and Stormies. I made the ganache this morning with tempered white chocolate at 30 degrees and it seems to be quite firm already. I'll let you know if it is firm enough to be sliced tomorrow.

I'm not sure if I care for the taste, however, I suspect that the flavour will be entirely different once it is dipped in dark chocolate. It is interesting that with ginger and dark rum in it, it tastes kind of minty.

#130 Desiderio

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 11:33 AM

I have made those for Mother's day , I really love the flavor .The ganache stayed soft but could be cut with no problem.
I have followed his tecnique for slabbed and piped ganache even with my own recipes and I have been very pleased with the results.My slabbed ganache is always soft and firm so easy to cut , but the texture is perfect.I think following his directions is crucial for the result.
Vanessa

#131 Kerry Beal

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 05:16 PM

Dark and Stormies are a success. Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful.

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#132 sote23

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 08:11 PM

Dark and Stormies are a success.  Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful. 

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kerry,
glad to hear it. I was looking at that recipe as well. Did you use the Bermudan rum or something else?

Luis

#133 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 03:45 AM

Dark and Stormies are a success.  Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful. 

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kerry,
glad to hear it. I was looking at that recipe as well. Did you use the Bermudan rum or something else?

Luis

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I used my favorite rum in the world Barbados Cockspur VSOR.

That's got me thinking that the next center I try should be to imitate the drink I love in Barbados which is any combination of fruit juices, grenadine and the Cockspur rum.

#134 sote23

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Posted 15 June 2007 - 11:44 AM

Dark and Stormies are a success.  Excellent flavour, texture is wonderful. 

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kerry,
glad to hear it. I was looking at that recipe as well. Did you use the Bermudan rum or something else?

Luis

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I used my favorite rum in the world Barbados Cockspur VSOR.

That's got me thinking that the next center I try should be to imitate the drink I love in Barbados which is any combination of fruit juices, grenadine and the Cockspur rum.

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That would be intersting. keep us posted.

Luis

#135 gnuf

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 05:27 AM

Does this book discuss making chocolate decorations? I just saw the Wybauw book on the subject, but it's expensive and not readily available.

#136 Kerry Beal

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 06:44 AM

Does this book discuss making chocolate decorations? I just saw the Wybauw book on the subject, but it's expensive and not readily available.

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No, this book doesn't cover decoration. The Wybauw book is definately the best I've seen for that. They carry it at Chocolat-Chocolat. I know Qzina has it too, they are always trying to get me to pick up the copy they got for me, but I found it months earlier elsewhere.

$59.85 on Amazon!!!

Edited by Kerry Beal, 23 June 2007 - 06:45 AM.


#137 prairiegirl

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 04:48 PM

I made the dulce de leche truffles. Instead of a truffle shell, I used the new Italian mould that is round with the Mayan design. I also used the airbrush and sprayed with red PCB. The dulce du leche I bought at an Italian grocery store. It really is quite a nice flavour. I will try to get a picture and post it.

#138 prairiegirl

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 05:36 PM

Here are the pictures. I don't think the true colours showed up as I took the pictures and not my hubby!
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#139 Desiderio

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 06:18 PM

Very nice and ymmy looking :smile:
Vanessa

#140 prairiegirl

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 06:28 PM

Thanks Vanessa. Tammy had the mould displayed in some of her photos from another posting and I fell in love with the mould!! The true colour did not come thru very well. The recipe is out of Greweling's book and it is delicious.

#141 gap

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 05:17 PM

Hi Everyone,

a callout to those of you who have made the Meltaways in this book. I am having trouble finding the coconut fat. I found what I thought may have been correct at a Vietnamese supermarket this weekend (called Creamed Coconut and was a solid and 70% fat) but the result was a pleasant tasting coconut chocolate rather than a meltaway.

For those of you who have succesfully made this product, what brandname of coconut fat did you use? Does it have an ingredient list? What % of fat was on the nutritional information? Any help would be appreciated :smile:

Edited by gap, 24 June 2007 - 05:18 PM.


#142 gfron1

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 05:47 PM

Indian markets often have coconut fat.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#143 mrose

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:14 PM

Indian markets often have coconut fat.

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I found some at my local grocery (organic) & at Walmart non-organic but 1/3 the price. Both were sold as coconut oil.

Edited by mrose, 24 June 2007 - 06:14 PM.

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#144 gap

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:24 PM

Thanks gfron, I'll give that a try.

mrose - was the coconut oil solid at room temperature? Also, can you remember what % fat was on the nutritional information panel (the coconut cream I was using was only 70% fat)

#145 mrose

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:40 PM

Thanks gfron, I'll give that a try.

mrose - was the coconut oil solid at room temperature? Also, can you remember what % fat was on the nutritional information panel (the coconut cream I was using was only 70% fat)

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It was organic & solid at room temp, not sure which is # you want. 100% coconut oil, 60% Sat fat.
Mark
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#146 gap

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 07:20 PM

Thanks for the info - anything which helps get me closer. I have looked for coconut oil at a few places but didn't realise it was solid at room temp, so that may be why I missed it.

#147 Trishiad

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 08:24 PM

From Whole Foods I bought:
Spectrum brand Organic Coconut Oil
it is solid and white and in a glass jar with a golden lid.

While the meltaways were nice, I thought they weren't creamy enough. I have a feeling many of the meltaways I've eaten in my life contained shortening.

#148 gap

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 09:58 PM

Thanks Trishiad. I notice a few people have mentioned organic food stores. We have one near us at a local market so I might give that a try this weekend.

#149 lapin d'or

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 06:07 AM

My coconut oil came from an asian store, it is actually in a bottle so you have to warm the whole bottle to get any out. This product is sometimes kept with the hair care products - you just need to be sure it is pure.

I use half milk half plain chocolate for my meltaways and that gives quite a nice texture. I've tried them with lime oil and mint oil and like both, but the mint was more distinctive.

#150 gap

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 03:05 PM

Thanks all for the advice. I stopped by an organic foodstore on the way home last night and they knew exactly what I was after when I asked for coconut oil (which I had just always assumed was a liquid which is why I couldn't find it previously). Hopefully I'll get a chance to try these on the weekend.





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