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Cooking with "Chocolates and Confections" by Peter Greweling (Part 1)

Confections Chocolate Cookbook

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#31 Desiderio

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 06:20 PM

When I tryed work with sugar I used my hubby working lamp ( name?) anyway that thing is pretty hot and it kept the sugar warm.
Vanessa

#32 ChristopherMichael

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 09:36 PM

This book is by far the best book for someone who wants to learn to become a professional chocolatier or for those pastry chefs that want to learn or open their eyes a little bit more to chocolate. Unlike most of the other books (with the exception of Wybauws), this book is more geared to professionals. I own a tone of chocolate books, including books by Andrew Shotts, Recchuiti, Nick Malgieri, etc. and none of them seem to be geared for a professional kitchen or student, but more for the weekend warrior. Actually, those other book (again, with the exception of Wybauws) tend to confuse or contradict a lot of things I learned in school and tend to confuse or screw things up. This book by Peter Greweling actually helps you to understand why things are happening and how to avoid or correct a problem at the same introducing you to new techniques. He also seems to gear the recipes for a commercial kitchen environment.

If I would have to decide on one book, this is by far the best book out there, at least in my opinion. I would even recommend this over Wybauws book, because it seems to go into more detail at a less confusing way (you can say an easy read).

Again, this is just my opinion and you may or may not agree.

#33 SugarGirl

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 12:12 AM

I just found a  175W clear infared bulb on eBay for $5 which you could probably just put on a gooseneck lamp.  I'll bet you could construct a sugar box of plexiglass and one of these lamps for less than $30.

Is there anything special to look for in a cream siphon?

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Any old cream siphon should work. I was looking at some gorgeous big ISI units today at the cooking store where I teach, those would allow you to make a nice big batch of the holey chocolate, but I've never bought a new cream siphon, I find all mine at thrift stores for about $5. The one I'm currently using holds 500 ml.

I bet if I search this house there is a heat lamp somewhere that I can make use of.

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I made hard candies in culinary school at CIA-Greystone, and we never used a heat lamp for them, so I don't think it's critical for candies -- we only used heat lamps in a box (in conjunction with the microwave) while we were doing sugar sculptures. If our (I'll call it) "sugar slab" got too cold to manipulate while making candies, we put it into a warm oven very briefly until it softened just a little; the oven could be btw 250-350. We just wore layers of gloves... b/c it's hot work any way you do it... :)

#34 Kerry Beal

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 04:58 AM

This book is by far the best book for someone who wants to learn to become a professional chocolatier or for those pastry chefs that want to learn or open their eyes a little bit more to chocolate. Unlike most of the other books (with the exception of Wybauws), this book is more geared to professionals. I own a tone of chocolate books, including books by Andrew Shotts, Recchuiti, Nick Malgieri, etc. and none of them seem to be geared for a professional kitchen or student, but more for the weekend warrior. Actually, those other book (again, with the exception of Wybauws) tend to confuse or contradict a lot of things I learned in school and tend to confuse or screw things up. This book by Peter Greweling actually helps you to understand why things are happening and how to avoid or correct a problem at the same introducing you to new techniques. He also seems to gear the recipes for a commercial kitchen environment. 

If I would have to decide on one book, this is by far the best book out there, at least in my opinion. I would even recommend this over Wybauws book, because it seems to go into more detail at a less confusing way (you can say an easy read).

Again, this is just my opinion and you may or may not agree.

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Bang on!! What I have found is this book consolidates the info from a lot of professional books I have, but is the first one I've seen where all the info is in one place.

I don't think you need to be a professional to benefit from it though, the weekend warriors will learn just as much.

#35 prairiegirl

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 07:01 PM

I will get the book, but, for now, what is a cream siphon?

#36 Kerry Beal

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 07:13 PM

I will get the book, but, for now, what is a cream siphon?

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Here is a picture of one.

#37 pupkinpie2

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Posted 08 March 2007 - 10:34 PM

Wow, I didnt know Peter Greweling put out a book. I had him as an instructor about 3-4 years ago at the CIA. I learned so much from him and I still have all the notes and recipes from the class. The book sounds great, ill look into getting it.

#38 Stuckey

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 02:29 AM

Wow, I didnt know Peter Greweling put out a book.  I had him as an instructor about 3-4 years ago at the CIA.  I learned so much from him and I still have all the notes and recipes from the class.  The book sounds great, ill look into getting it.

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I'm currently waiting to receive my copy from Amazon. It already seems as if this book is going to become one of the definitive books on the subject. Do you folks think it is still worthwhile to get a copy of Wybauw's Fine Chocolates: Great Experience is one already owns the Greweling book?

#39 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 05:08 AM

I'm currently waiting to receive my copy from Amazon. It already seems as if this book is going to become one of the definitive books on the subject. Do you folks think it is still worthwhile to get a copy of Wybauw's Fine Chocolates: Great Experience is one already owns the Greweling book?

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Of course, you can never have too many good chocolate books!

#40 Lysbeth

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 07:47 AM

This book is by far the best book for someone who wants to learn to become a professional chocolatier or for those pastry chefs that want to learn or open their eyes a little bit more to chocolate. Unlike most of the other books (with the exception of Wybauws), this book is more geared to professionals. I own a tone of chocolate books, including books by Andrew Shotts, Recchuiti, Nick Malgieri, etc. and none of them seem to be geared for a professional kitchen or student, but more for the weekend warrior. Actually, those other book (again, with the exception of Wybauws) tend to confuse or contradict a lot of things I learned in school and tend to confuse or screw things up. This book by Peter Greweling actually helps you to understand why things are happening and how to avoid or correct a problem at the same introducing you to new techniques. He also seems to gear the recipes for a commercial kitchen environment. 

If I would have to decide on one book, this is by far the best book out there, at least in my opinion. I would even recommend this over Wybauws book, because it seems to go into more detail at a less confusing way (you can say an easy read).

Again, this is just my opinion and you may or may not agree.

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I completely agree, I am so impressed with this book because is seems to be all-inclusive. It has many different techniques in it that I haven't seen discussed anywhere else, or if they were discussed, it wasn't in as great a detail. I love the pictures and the troubleshooting tables. I still can't believe it was only $40.95 at Amazon. With its 388 pages, the many color photographs and the measurements given in metric, oz and percentages (plus yields on every recipe) this is the best book I think I own so far. I have a lot of the other chocolate books that are out there and like ChristopherMichael said the only other one that comes close is JPW's book which is nice because it is really technical and it has much information about shelf life.

Lysbeth

#41 tammylc

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 04:41 AM

I made my first recipe from the book last night, although it hardly counts. I was testing out a bunch of different peanut butter formulations, so I tried the peanut butter guanduja (which is in the book in the section on jellies, as it goes with a raspberry jelly layer in the book). Anyway, as I said - hardly counts, as it was just 2 parts milk chocolate to 1 part peanut butter. Tasty, though, and great texture. I ended up opting for a different kind of preparation, but I'm sure I'll end up using this one later.

Today I'm planning to try following his slab ganache technique to the letter, in the hopes that it will help me with some texture problems I've been having. He's very strong on the use of tempered chocolate in ganache, which is a conversation we've had in other places on the forum. Previous discussions have mostly been around its effect on shelf life and water activity, but Grewling claims that it's essential for proper texture and crystal formation in the finished ganache. Any thoughts? I've got a little too much to do today already, but sometime I'd like to make two batches side by side - one tempered, one not - and see if I can tell the difference.

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#42 Anna N

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 06:34 AM

. . .

Today I'm planning to try following his slab ganache technique to the letter, in the hopes that it will help me with some texture problems I've been having.  He's very strong on the use of tempered chocolate in ganache, which is a conversation we've had in other places on the forum.  Previous discussions have mostly been around its effect on shelf life and water activity, but Grewling claims that it's essential for proper texture and crystal formation in the finished ganache.  Any thoughts?  I've got a little too much to do today already, but sometime I'd like to make two batches side by side - one tempered, one not - and see if I can tell the difference.

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This is a very interesting experiment! From my point of view, the difference in quality would have to be substantial to justify the extra time and effort to temper the chocolate for ganache. Do post your results.
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#43 choux

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 09:31 AM

I tried the coffee ganache from the Hazelnut Latte, I don't really know if it was worth the extra steps. Mine turned out kind of 'waxy'. It was firmer than I thought it would be, I like mine to be softer. I also tried the Apricot Butter Gancahe, it was the first time I've tried a butter ganache, and I quite liked it. The alcohol flavour was way too strong, but I liked the texture. It was firm at first, but then it kind of melts away.

#44 tammylc

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 08:24 PM

I haven't made any actual recipes from the book yet, but I did use his slab ganache technique and explanation of ratios to reformulate two flavors I'm working on for Easter, cardamom and raspberry.

I used my new cutter from Tomric to cut all the ganache into little egg shapes, thinking I'd need to leave them out to dry overnight before dipping tomorrow. However, the book seems to indicate that he dips the pieces immediately after cutting. Any thoughts on this? Is it because he's using a fairly stiff ganache to start with?

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#45 gap

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 01:07 AM

Tammy - when we were using cutters at school, we left the slab of ganache overnight to set up and then cut the shapes out and dipped immediately.

#46 tammylc

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 04:26 AM

Tammy - when we were using cutters at school, we left the slab of ganache overnight to set up and then cut the shapes out and dipped immediately.

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I'll definitely do that next time - it'll make production much easier for me anyway, since long wait times are a problem for me. By the time I figured this out on Friday, I was way too tired to do anything but crash, and then by the time I got to them on Saturday, they were decidedly drier than I would have preferred (I did cover them with saran, but not well enough). Live and learn - luckily these aren't for anyone in particular, just testing.

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#47 Trishiad

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 09:40 AM

My copy finally arrived in the middle of a very busy weekend. I have just begun to skim through and am just thrilled. This book seems to hold all of the information I have been ferreting around trying to gather for years. It is more thorough than any other book and provides so many more answers than that online course I took a few years ago. It seems to unlock some of the secrets of chocolate that have been so difficult to unlock previously. And for practically free!
It's almost a shame, all that info right there for just anyone to use. They don't have to work for it like all of us have. I said something to my online instructor about the secrets of the industry and she said there were no such secrets. hmmmm.

time to blaze some new trails I suppose.

#48 lapin d'or

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 10:26 AM

I was looking for something really easy to do at the weekend so I made the 'Mint Meltaways'. This recipe was incredibly simple as you did not need to temper the chocolate you just melted it and added melted coconut fat and the mint oil.

I used half plain (60% cocoa) and half milk chocolate but would use a bit more plain next time. The mixture is worked for a little on a marble slab and then framed once it is cool. The mixture is then cut up and the pieces dusted with icing sugar.

This is quite a rich mixture with 23 percent coconut fat but I really liked the melting texture and am keen to try it with a few different oils like lime and cardamon.

Having the recipes in percentages makes it so easy to scale down as I did for this one as I only wanted a few pieces not 48 oz. I think it is a lovely to book to work with - very clear layout.


Jill

#49 tammylc

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 10:37 AM

Having the recipes in percentages makes it so easy to scale down as I did for this one as I only wanted a few pieces not 48 oz. I think it is a lovely to book to work with - very clear layout.


I agree. I love the combination of measurements and the percentages.

It had me practicing my long unused algebra skills this weekend. I was developing a ganache formulation using his guidelines. I knew what volume I wanted to end up with to get the thickness I was looking for in the size frame I was using, so then I had to figure out how much of each ingredient to use based on his theory of ganache creation. I always loved algebra, so I found this strangely fun.

Edited by tammylc, 12 March 2007 - 10:40 AM.

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#50 Lysbeth

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 12:32 PM

Phew, I finally had some time to make something from the book this weekend. When everyone was still asleep I whipped up a batch of nougat and it was sooo good. I couldn't wait to cut into it so it was still a little soft at the time, but that didn't matter. The only thing I would do different the next time is leave the cherries whole rather then quarter them. Because they were quartered they left some streaks when I tried to stir them into the sticky nougat. But again, that didn't affect the flavor, so it was all right. Great recipe, great flavor, just the food cost is a little high at about $15 per batch (and this was using a cheap honey too...) Now I can't wait to try the aero bars and the soft caramels. My poor crowns... my dentist is going to have a field day.

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#51 David J.

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 04:16 PM

OK, did anybody else notice that on page 68 Greweling is showing a Badger Model 150 internal mix dual action air brush painting colored cocoa butter? I was under the impression from earlier threads that an internal mix brush would get hopelessly clogged, but apparently this is not the case.

I saw the picture and matched it up with the only Badger model it could be based on the color of the stem, the feed, and most important, the dual action trigger button.

The mist shown is much finer and under much more control that I can get with my external mix Badger Model 250. I don't know what head he has on it, but I suspect it is either Medium or Heavy:

Fine (F) - pencil line to 2” (51mm) spray pattern
Medium (M) - 1/32” (0.8mm) to 2 1/2” (63mm) spray pattern
Heavy (H) - from 1/16” (1.5mm) to 3” (76mm) spray pattern

Fine: Best suited to spray thinner materials such as water colors, inks, dyes, food coloring and gouache.
Medium:The most popular choice; will spray airbrush ready paints, such as Badger’s Air-Opaque,Air-Tex, Modelflex, Freakflex, Nail Flair,
and other properly reduced acrylics.
Heavy: Ideal for heavily pigmented and/or higher viscosity materials such as enamels, lacquers, reduced glazes, gesso, and varnish

This is getting me interested in trying out this model to see what sort of effects I can get painting molds. The Model 250 was so coarse in its spray that I didn't consider being able to do much other than heavy coating. The dual action lets you really control the flow of the line and that intrigues me. Being able to draw as fine a line as 1/16" with the heavy tip opens up possibilities.

#52 Anna N

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 04:50 PM

Phew, I finally had some time to make something from the book this weekend. When everyone was still asleep I whipped up a batch of nougat and it was sooo good.

. . .

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Looks fabulous. I am anxious to try the nougat recipes but have been under the weather all week - hoping to be back to normal soon and ready to rumble. :rolleyes:
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#53 Desiderio

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 05:23 PM

OK, did anybody else notice that on page 68 Greweling is showing a Badger Model 150 internal mix dual action air brush painting colored cocoa butter?  I was under the impression from earlier threads that an internal mix brush would get hopelessly clogged, but apparently this is not the case.

I saw the picture and matched it up with the only Badger model it could be based on the color of the stem, the feed, and most important, the dual action trigger button.

The mist shown is much finer and under much more control that I can get with my external mix Badger Model 250.  I don't know what head he has on it, but I suspect it is either Medium or Heavy:

Fine (F) - pencil line to 2” (51mm) spray pattern
Medium (M) - 1/32” (0.8mm) to 2 1/2” (63mm) spray pattern
Heavy (H) - from 1/16” (1.5mm) to 3” (76mm) spray pattern

Fine: Best suited to spray thinner materials such as water colors, inks, dyes, food coloring and gouache.
Medium:The most popular choice; will spray airbrush ready paints, such as Badger’s Air-Opaque,Air-Tex, Modelflex, Freakflex, Nail Flair,
and other properly reduced acrylics.
Heavy: Ideal for heavily pigmented and/or higher viscosity materials such as enamels, lacquers, reduced glazes, gesso, and varnish

This is getting me interested in trying out this model to see what sort of effects I can get painting molds.  The Model 250 was so coarse in its spray that I didn't consider being able to do much other than heavy coating.  The dual action lets you really control the flow of the line and that intrigues me.  Being able to draw as fine a line as 1/16" with the heavy tip opens up possibilities.

View Post


I have noticed that as well.Didnt know what kind of airbrush was. generally those are little bit more expensive than the badger 250.
Anyway I would love as well to try a different one with a finer line .I was looking at the badger aibrushes and found this one , http://www.hobbylinc...ad/bad200-1.htm
What do you think.
I use the badger 250 and I am able to obtain a pretty good effects but not fine lines.
Vanessa

#54 Kerry Beal

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 09:43 PM

I  have noticed that as well.Didnt know what kind of airbrush was. generally those are little bit more expensive than the badger 250.
Anyway I would love as well to try a different one with a finer line .I was looking at  the badger aibrushes and found this one , http://www.hobbylinc...ad/bad200-1.htm
What do you think.
I use the badger 250 and I am able to obtain a pretty good effects but not fine lines.

View Post

As well as the little badger, I have an Iwata that should be able to make fine lines, but try as I might it doesn't seem to happen with cocoa butter.

By the way, at the French Pastry School we got to see a lovely spray booth that Design Realization in Montreal carries, it really did a nice job of controlling the spray.

#55 mrose

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 05:45 AM

How was the class?

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#56 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 06:37 AM

How was the class?

Mark

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Absolutely wonderful. Over the next couple of days we'll start a thread to share what we learned. We need John's pictures cause he was the 'official eG photographer' for the group. I just ended up writing stuff rather than taking pictures.

It was interesting to me to do some comparison of Greweling and Wybauw's techniques. Both are advocating tempering ganache, using slightly different methods.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 17 March 2007 - 06:39 AM.


#57 Desiderio

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 12:20 PM

How was the class?

Mark

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Absolutely wonderful. Over the next couple of days we'll start a thread to share what we learned. We need John's pictures cause he was the 'official eG photographer' for the group. I just ended up writing stuff rather than taking pictures.

It was interesting to me to do some comparison of Greweling and Wybauw's techniques. Both are advocating tempering ganache, using slightly different methods.

View Post


Welcome back guys!!
We sure missed you in these days :biggrin:
Thank you so much for willing to share the faboulous experience with the rest of us , thank you so much.
Vanessa

#58 David J.

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 02:03 PM

I  have noticed that as well.Didnt know what kind of airbrush was. generally those are little bit more expensive than the badger 250.
Anyway I would love as well to try a different one with a finer line .I was looking at  the badger aibrushes and found this one , http://www.hobbylinc...ad/bad200-1.htm
What do you think.
I use the badger 250 and I am able to obtain a pretty good effects but not fine lines.


The brush in the book is dual action and I think that might be the key.

Being able to run the air without the cocoa butter would let you blow the nozzle clean after each stroke. That would keep the insides from setting solid. Being able to vary the one or the other is also supposed to let you vary the line as you go.

#59 Ke Kau

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 02:51 PM

The concave designs of most moulds do not allow fine lines. The pressure from the air, even on a double action brush, gets condensed by the dimensions of the mould and pushes the colorant around. Masking and layer building are the only alternatives. They both yield good results, but are very time consuming. I remember someone posting awhile back about devising silicone inserts for moulds which could possibly achieve the same effect. Even this would require some form of adhesive to obtain clean lines which, once again, would be time consuming. In a hobbyist time frame you can produce magnificent pieces with great detail, but from a production perspective...well let's just say, "I wish...." Good luck.

Shane Tracey
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www.kekau.com

#60 David J.

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 08:31 PM

The concave designs of most moulds do not allow fine lines.  The pressure from the air, even on a double action brush, gets condensed by the dimensions of the mould and pushes the colorant around. Masking and layer building are the only alternatives. They both yield good results, but are very time consuming.  I remember someone posting awhile back about devising silicone inserts for moulds which could possibly achieve the same effect.  Even this would require some form of adhesive to obtain clean lines which, once again, would be time consuming.  In a hobbyist time frame you can produce magnificent pieces with great detail, but from a production perspective...well let's just say, "I wish...."  Good luck.

Shane Tracey
KeKau Chocolatier
www.kekau.com

View Post


That's a good point about any deep concave design messing with air flow.

While that would prevent you from creating detailed designs I think that a dual action brush would still let you put small dots of color if you pulled the trigger back only a tiny bit to let out just a bit of color. At the least it would let you focus the stream better than the external model I have that causes me to overspray by quite a bit. The work in the books photo is cleaner than I could reproduce with my setup.

That was me who was working on silicon inserts for the purpose of making fitting stencils. I found that it didn't work well for a couple reasons. The first was that even as thin as I could make them, the wall thickness shadowed some of the design. The second was that the air pressure tended to blow paint under the stencil, even to the point of blowing it out of the mold entirely if held too close. Of course I was working with a compressor that lacked a regulator and that might be able to be overcome to some degree.

Someone might eventually figure out how to make an effective stencil, but I'm out of ideas at the moment. Brushes and freehand work are the only thing capable of detail designs right now and that's not for production work.

However an airbrush and stencils may be just the ticket for making home made transfer sheets...





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