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Enrober Questions


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#61 Marmalade

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Posted 14 June 2008 - 05:14 PM

Hi:

I just bought a Prefamac 30kg machine with the enrober attachment from bakonusa.com. It was about $20,000. Doesn't have all the bells and whistles of other machines for more money, but thus far it's been great for both molded pieces and enrobing. Basically takes 2 people to operate, but I am very pleased with the results. It's a good machine for mid-volume and not as steep as LCM, Savvy or some others. Also I am very pleased with the customer service from Luc at Bakon USA. Let me know if you have any questions and I'll be glad to answer them.

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It's got a wheel, doesn't it? How do you find cleanup? Do you find the chocolate thickens significantly during the day?

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Yes, it's got a wheel. Cleanup is not bad as there are not to many tight corners. You have a couple of hours before thickening really sets in, but it's easy to control with a few minutes of a heat gun or adjusting the thermostat up for a little while. But I find the heat gun is the easiest and fastest method to thin quickly. I am very satisfied with my results, the shine and evenness of temper is far better than what I could get by hand, and the vibrating table is awesome.
Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#62 Marmalade

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 10:43 AM

I thought I'd put my two cents in here on enrobing since I never could find much info on the web, and now that I own an enrober, I'm sure other people will appreciate the input. I looked at LCM, Savvy, and Prefamac, JKV, and Mol d'art. The last three look pretty similar in all the photos. I decided on Prefamac after having seen them operating in a number of places, because it's a simple machine, fit my budget, and couldn't wait three or four months for the order to be filled, and they had good customer service, both from the US and Belgium. I ordered from bakonusa.com in the US and my equipment was ready within a month and airfreighted to Ecuador, where we are located. It was cheaper than ordering direct from Belgium.

We just purchased a Prefamac 30kg melter, enrober and detailer attachment. First, after using it a couple of weeks, I have to say I think enrobers and chocolatiers are a bit like cameras and photographers. The skill of the person using either is far more important than the equipment, the amount you paid, or the number of bells and whistles.

I'm in Ecuador, and I don't have access to many different chocolates with different viscosities and for different purposes. Basically, I have access to two or three types of chocolate, and I have to adjust them all myself using cocoa butter to thin. This has been a bit challenging to find just the right percent to add, but it's been an interesting learning experience as well to see how the chocolate changes shine and snap with different amounts of cocoa butter.

For the Prefamac, I have found the detailer attachment is a must. It's a little spinning rod at the end of the take off belt before the pieces hit the paper. You adjust it just right and the pieces sort of get lifted gently and carried over, while the spinning takes off excess chocolate, eliminating feet, and cuts off any tails. It took me about 1,000 pieces to figure out how to use it just right, as well as run the whole operation.

At first I couldn't figure out how to keep up with the fast speed of the belt, but it really didn't matter once we figured out you simply pull the paper taut when needed, just as the pieces are coming off the wire conveyor belt. Then you loosen up slack a bit until the next row of pieces is about to come off. So you don't waste paper by having a mechanical pull moving the paper all the time. Ideally, the paper belt and conveyor belt would have perhaps separate foot pedals for control, but those are some of the bells and whistles I wasn't willing to pay for, and my volume doesn't justify the costs. Yes, it really does take two people to operate this thing optimally.

The vibrating of the belt is adjusted by tightening or loosening a spring loaded arm that is under the belt shortly after the pieces are enrobed. There is also a blower attachment, but I haven't shelled out for that yet. Perhaps later.

A lot of people have asked about the chocolate thickening during the day, which it does, but is easily remedied by a couple of minutes with a heat gun or turning up the thermostat gently. I have found this to be a very minor inconvenience.

Production wise, we used to dip say 100 pieces an hour. I can easily put out say 1500 to 2000 pieces in an hour, so as the Savvy-Goiseau sale rep said to me, your volume should increase easily 10x-20x, which it has. Of course, right now the equipment (especially the enrober) is underutilized, but as I was wisely advised, buy a machine you will grow into in a year or two, not one that just meets your needs for the present.

And by the way, the vibrating table which is standard is great for molds! NO bubbles!

Photos!

Chocolate Caramels Scored and Ready for Cutting

Posted Image

The enrober
Posted Image

Me at the Machine

Posted Image

Chocolate Caramels Enrobed with Texture Sheets

Posted Image

Finished Pieces, Still would like cleaner squares on top, but they'll sell!

Posted Image

Edited by Marmalade, 17 June 2008 - 08:38 AM.

Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#63 Lior

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 01:09 PM

Thanks!! Waiting for photos! How nice!!

#64 Kerry Beal

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Posted 16 June 2008 - 06:25 PM

Great photos Jeffrey. Thanks for the description.

#65 Marmalade

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 08:33 PM

http://www.hilliards..._HandCoater.cfm

Has anyone used this hand coater from Hilliard's??

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I've used one and I didn't really like it. No paper take off is a big problem, no vibrating portion of the belt, no detailer, no blower. It's fine if you want the rustic look, say for truffles, but for guitar cut pieces, rather difficult to get good results. And it doesn't have, say, the dual capacity of a machine like I purchased (description below), that can be used for both molds with a vibrating table, or with an enrober attachment. Sure, the price is 2x as much, but you get better results and dual use.
Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#66 Marmalade

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 08:37 PM

I thought I'd put my two cents in here on enrobing since I never could find much info on the web, and now that I own an enrober, I'm sure other people will appreciate the input. I looked at LCM, Savvy, and Prefamac, JKV, and Mol d'art. The last three look pretty similar in all the photos. I decided on Prefamac after having seen them operating in a number of places, because it's a simple machine, fit my budget, and couldn't wait three or four months for the order to be filled, and they had good customer service, both from the US and Belgium. I ordered from bakonusa.com in the US and my equipment was ready within a month and airfreighted to Ecuador, where we are located. It was cheaper than ordering direct from Belgium.

We just purchased a Prefamac 30kg melter, enrober and detailer attachment. First, after using it a couple of weeks, I have to say I think enrobers and chocolatiers are a bit like cameras and photographers. The skill of the person using either is far more important than the equipment, the amount you paid, or the number of bells and whistles.

I'm in Ecuador, and I don't have access to many different chocolates with different viscosities and for different purposes. Basically, I have access to two or three types of chocolate, and I have to adjust them all myself using cocoa butter to thin. This has been a bit challenging to find just the right percent to add, but it's been an interesting learning experience as well to see how the chocolate changes shine and snap with different amounts of cocoa butter.

For the Prefamac, I have found the detailer attachment is a must. It's a little spinning rod at the end of the take off belt before the pieces hit the paper. You adjust it just right and the pieces sort of get lifted gently and carried over, while the spinning takes off excess chocolate, eliminating feet, and cuts off any tails. It took me about 1,000 pieces to figure out how to use it just right, as well as run the whole operation.

At first I couldn't figure out how to keep up with the fast speed of the belt, but it really didn't matter once we figured out you simply pull the paper taut when needed, just as the pieces are coming off the wire conveyor belt. Then you loosen up slack a bit until the next row of pieces is about to come off. So you don't waste paper by having a mechanical pull moving the paper all the time. Ideally, the paper belt and conveyor belt would have perhaps separate foot pedals for control, but those are some of the bells and whistles I wasn't willing to pay for, and my volume doesn't justify the costs. Yes, it really does take two people to operate this thing optimally.

The vibrating of the belt is adjusted by tightening or loosening a spring loaded arm that is under the belt shortly after the pieces are enrobed. There is also a blower attachment, but I haven't shelled out for that yet. Perhaps later.

A lot of people have asked about the chocolate thickening during the day, which it does, but is easily remedied by a couple of minutes with a heat gun or turning up the thermostat gently. I have found this to be a very minor inconvenience.

Production wise, we used to dip say 100 pieces an hour. I can easily put out say 1500 to 2000 pieces in an hour, so as the Savvy-Goiseau sale rep said to me, your volume should increase easily 10x-20x, which it has. Of course, right now the equipment (especially the enrober) is underutilized, but as I was wisely advised, buy a machine you will grow into in a year or two, not one that just meets your needs for the present.

And by the way, the vibrating table which is standard is great for molds! NO bubbles!

Oh, forgot to add it does come with two stainless steel plates about a meter each in length to help with take off from the belt once you have the paper filled with pieces.

Photos!

Chocolate Caramels Scored and Ready for Cutting

Posted Image

The enrober
Posted Image

Me at the Machine

Posted Image

Chocolate Caramels Enrobed with Texture Sheets

Posted Image

Finished Pieces, Still would like cleaner squares on top, but they'll sell!

Posted Image

View Post


Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#67 Lior

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Posted 17 June 2008 - 11:29 PM

How fantastic!! Lucky you!! Thanks so much!

#68 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 03:58 AM

Jeffrey - what are you after when you say 'cleaner' on top? With ganaches in Belgium Steph had us spread a thin foot layer on the top of the slab immediately before cutting - so you cut while it was still soft. It made for much sharper edges on the enrobed tops.

#69 Marmalade

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 04:10 AM

Jeffrey - what are you after when you say 'cleaner' on top?  With ganaches in Belgium Steph had us spread a thin foot layer on the top of the slab immediately before cutting - so you cut while it was still soft.  It made for much sharper edges on the enrobed tops.

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I want my textures or transfers to end up with a more square pattern that is more flush with the actual shape of the piece, without the rounded corners. It would be a bit hard to do on caramels since they take a while to cut, but for regular slabs, that would be easy. I have also read the suggestion of letting your cut slab pieces dry out an additional night to firm them up after the cutting. Thanks for the tip, I'll have to try that.

Edited by Marmalade, 18 June 2008 - 04:22 AM.

Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#70 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 05:07 AM

Jeffrey - what are you after when you say 'cleaner' on top?  With ganaches in Belgium Steph had us spread a thin foot layer on the top of the slab immediately before cutting - so you cut while it was still soft.  It made for much sharper edges on the enrobed tops.

View Post


I want my textures or transfers to end up with a more square pattern that is more flush with the actual shape of the piece, without the rounded corners. It would be a bit hard to do on caramels since they take a while to cut, but for regular slabs, that would be easy. I have also read the suggestion of letting your cut slab pieces dry out an additional night to firm them up after the cutting. Thanks for the tip, I'll have to try that.

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Are you rubbing the tops after you place the texture sheet? You might be able to square them up a bit that way too for the caramels.

#71 Marmalade

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 05:38 AM

Are you rubbing the tops after you place the texture sheet?  You might be able to square them up a bit that way too for the caramels.

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Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.
Jeffrey Stern
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http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#72 John DePaula

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 08:01 AM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

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One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#73 Marmalade

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 08:49 AM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

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One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.

View Post


Thanks for the tip. I have cut the texture sheets up but hadn´t heard of the brush technique. I will have to try it.
Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#74 John DePaula

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 03:26 PM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

View Post

One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.

View Post


Thanks for the tip. I have cut the texture sheets up but hadn´t heard of the brush technique. I will have to try it.

View Post

I saw that Lior just posted some pix from her class (Trendy Pralines Callebaut) and if I may borrow one, it partially illustrates the technique about which I was talking:


Posted Image

To me, the acetate in the pic doesn't look quite stiff enough to get a nice flat surface, but you should be able to do so with a stiffer grade acetate and certainly with the structure sheets cut into squares.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#75 Marmalade

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 03:37 PM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

View Post

One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.

View Post


Thanks for the tip. I have cut the texture sheets up but hadn´t heard of the brush technique. I will have to try it.

View Post

I saw that Lior just posted some pix from her class (Trendy Pralines Callebaut) and if I may borrow one, it partially illustrates the technique about which I was talking:


Posted Image

To me, the acetate in the pic doesn't look quite stiff enough to get a nice flat surface, but you should be able to do so with a stiffer grade acetate and certainly with the structure sheets cut into squares.

View Post


I saw that, I also appreciated the tip about putting the pieces on the enrober to feed corner first, hadn't thought of that.
Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#76 dcat

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 05:03 PM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

View Post

One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.

View Post


I use a 4-tine dipping fork to apply just enough pressure to set the individual squares of structure sheet to hand-dipped pieces. (No enrober for me either; I haven't found one small enough to fit in my kitchen.) The 4-tine fork is the right size to fit the dipped pralines and allows me to apply the sheets quicker than when I used a narrower fork or my finger. There's still a bit of rounding on the finished piece, but it's usually not very noticible unless the chocolate is too thick. The thicker the chocolate, the more pronounced the rounding seems to be.

One of these days I'll get a brush and try it for comparision.
David

#77 ejw50

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Posted 18 June 2008 - 06:57 PM

Thanks for the pics!!

I also noticed from your pic that you don't need some fancy and hard-to-maintain guitar. You can just buy one of those rollers that they sell at JB Prince instead. It costs a lot less money and can also be used for cutting Joconde cake!

Thanks again!!!

Posted Image

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#78 Marmalade

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Posted 19 June 2008 - 05:15 PM

Thanks for the pics!!

I also noticed from your pic that you don't need some fancy and hard-to-maintain guitar.  You can just buy one of those rollers that they sell at JB Prince instead.  It costs  a lot less money and  can also be used for cutting Joconde cake!

Thanks again!!!

Posted Image

View Post

View Post


Actually, we do have a guitar cutter but you can't cut caramel with a guitar. And you really can't cut ganache with a caramel cutter; the pieces will stick inside the blades. :biggrin: You can score firm caramel with the cutter so you get good straight lines, and if it's soft enough, you can actually cut it. However, you need to dip or enrobe soft caramels within just a few hours, or they will begin to lose their shape from as the caramel starts to very slowly and imperceptibly flow.

Another thing to watch out for is to make sure that when you cast your slab of caramel or ganache, using either a frame or confetionary bars, that the height is very even throughout. This is sometimes tricky as hot caramel firms up fast on top and properly pre-crystallized ganache also starts to firm up rather quickly. If you don't get an even slab, then your pieces will be of differing heights and will not be uniform.

Finally, a guitar cutter is actually pretty easy to maintain, just keep it clean and don't ever use too much force, always gentle slow pressure, or you will have lots of broken wires! :sad:
Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#79 Lloydchoc

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Posted 25 June 2008 - 10:17 PM

We have often looked at getting an enrober, but we can't figure out how to get the precision placement of our transfers that we need for the look that we are after. Here are two examples:
Posted Image
and
Posted Image

We find that they have to be very carefully placed on a piece of chocolate and I can't imagine being able to place them well on a moving belt.

Does anybody have any ideas?

#80 Lior

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 12:25 AM

Not about placing precisely, but JPW had very simply made himself a utensil that he gently pressed transfers with onto the pralines. I had wanted to take a picture and forgot! It was somethingsoft perhaps a sponge, that he cut into a squarish shape. It was poked onto a short stick and covered with saran wrap or something. I will email a friend and see if she has a pic or more precise info. It worked beautifully.

The only solution for time saving perfect precision would be magnetic molds, I think.

#81 Marmalade

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 05:00 AM

I have been using a puffy make up brush to flatten the transfers after laying them on by hand just as John DePaula suggested and it works quite well. I feed 12-15 pieces through my enrober at time, which gives me enough time to apply the transfers after stopping the machine so that I can work on them without the machine running. 12-15 pieces is about as many as I can safely do before the chocolate sets up and it's too late to apply a transfer.

There are also small sponge brushes available at places like Michael's or A.C. Moore in the US that would make a good applicator for transfers.
Jeffrey Stern
www.jeffreygstern.com
http://bit.ly/cKwUL4
http://destination-ecuador.net
cocoapodman at gmail dot com

#82 John DePaula

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 07:23 AM

I have been using a puffy make up brush to flatten the transfers after laying them on by hand just as John DePaula suggested and it works quite well. I feed 12-15 pieces through my enrober at time, which gives me enough time to apply the transfers after stopping the machine so that I can work on them without the machine running. 12-15 pieces is about as many as I can safely do before the chocolate sets up and it's too late to apply a transfer.

There are also small sponge brushes available at places like Michael's or A.C. Moore in the US that would make a good applicator for transfers.

View Post

Hey, glad that worked out for you.

Lloyd, yes you'll definitely not be able to place the transfer on a moving belt. BTW, those chocolates are a nice bit of beautiful work!
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#83 schneich

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Posted 26 June 2008 - 12:42 PM

you get those custom printed transfers from pcb. they are quite reasonably priced, if you choose not more than 2 colors its the same price as the regular sheets. you can also get the transfers precut for single chocolates. what you do is to enrobe 30 or so chocolates, after enrobing stop the belt and put the transfers on, its really no big deal...


cheers


t.
toertchen toertchen
patissier chocolatier cafe
cologne, germany

#84 sote23

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 12:54 AM

My 3 year trek to starting a company is coming to a conclusion as I now have a space picked out and some revenue streams established.  The next big step is moving to some production equipment that makes sense for me.  I'd love to get an LCM machine but the price is high and the time to deliver is 4+ months.  So, I'm looking for a quicker turnaround time and a solid machine. 

Currently, I'm strongly considering the 50KG Mol D'art model Mol D'Art machines as it would be good for moulding which is a big part of my business.  It also has an attachment so it can be used for enrobing.  The capacity would work and the price is very reasonable.  I'm considering 2-3 machines with 1 being an enrober.  My concern is the dependability and tempering performance.  The turnaround time is quick and would allow me to launch faster. 

Anyone have experience with these machines for moulding as well as using the enrobing attachment? 

I'm also interested in any other good machines that won't cost me $20,000+ that are strong for molding.  I need to produce white/dark chocolate molds so I'd prefer 2 smaller machines at this point until I can afford the larger dual LCM machines.  Thanks in advance for your help.

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Has anyone taken a look at the Pomati tempering machine tomric is now selling? I wonder if the mechanism for tempering is better than the usual wheel.

Luis

#85 Kerry Beal

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 06:38 AM

Has anyone taken a look at the Pomati tempering machine tomric is now selling? I wonder if the mechanism for tempering is better than the usual wheel.

Luis

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The Pomati's are automatic tempering like the selmi. The little units don't have a shaker table. The quantities are small.

#86 sote23

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 03:27 PM

Has anyone taken a look at the Pomati tempering machine tomric is now selling? I wonder if the mechanism for tempering is better than the usual wheel.

Luis

View Post

The Pomati's are automatic tempering like the selmi. The little units don't have a shaker table. The quantities are small.

View Post


Thanks kerry,
I see the quantities are small, but as a starter it might not be too bad. they also have more upgraded models, but I can't seem to find what the costs are. Info is hard to find. Any idea what the T20 model runs?
Luis

Edited by sote23, 06 July 2008 - 03:31 PM.


#87 Kerry Beal

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 06:12 PM

Has anyone taken a look at the Pomati tempering machine tomric is now selling? I wonder if the mechanism for tempering is better than the usual wheel.

Luis

View Post

The Pomati's are automatic tempering like the selmi. The little units don't have a shaker table. The quantities are small.

View Post


Thanks kerry,
I see the quantities are small, but as a starter it might not be too bad. they also have more upgraded models, but I can't seem to find what the costs are. Info is hard to find. Any idea what the T20 model runs?
Luis

View Post

Not sure about that one, but looking at it online it looks equivalent to one of the Selmi machines, so I suspect you are looking at $15,000 or so before adding any sort of enrober or anything.

Here is the other thing, if you are looking at a machine like that, consider going to the slightly larger 30 kg machine, so that you can add an enrober if you want. It seems that the enrobers don't get put on machines smaller than that.

I was looking quite seriously at the little Pomati Java T6 that was good for 6kg. It is a cute little number, but no shaker, no ability to add an enrober and still around $8,000.

Edited by Kerry Beal, 06 July 2008 - 06:17 PM.


#88 sote23

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Posted 07 July 2008 - 01:05 AM

Has anyone taken a look at the Pomati tempering machine tomric is now selling? I wonder if the mechanism for tempering is better than the usual wheel.

Luis

View Post

The Pomati's are automatic tempering like the selmi. The little units don't have a shaker table. The quantities are small.

View Post


Thanks kerry,
I see the quantities are small, but as a starter it might not be too bad. they also have more upgraded models, but I can't seem to find what the costs are. Info is hard to find. Any idea what the T20 model runs?
Luis

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Not sure about that one, but looking at it online it looks equivalent to one of the Selmi machines, so I suspect you are looking at $15,000 or so before adding any sort of enrober or anything.

Here is the other thing, if you are looking at a machine like that, consider going to the slightly larger 30 kg machine, so that you can add an enrober if you want. It seems that the enrobers don't get put on machines smaller than that.

I was looking quite seriously at the little Pomati Java T6 that was good for 6kg. It is a cute little number, but no shaker, no ability to add an enrober and still around $8,000.

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I think it's an option, but I think I will eventually just go with the Selmi. It's what Jean Pierre recommends, and many other people use.

I was looking at the Sollich Minicoater, but I've heard Sollich is expensive.

Luis

#89 prairiegirl

prairiegirl
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  • Location:Calgary, Alberta

Posted 04 August 2008 - 01:25 PM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

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One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.

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Thanks for the tip. I have cut the texture sheets up but hadn´t heard of the brush technique. I will have to try it.

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I was at Bernard Callebaut last week and they line up the bonbons in rows 7X7 and then run under the enrober. The person at the other end puts on the transfer sheet and then with a normal 4 inch paint brush she brushed the bonbons lightly to get the sheets applied properly.

#90 sote23

sote23
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  • Location:California

Posted 04 August 2008 - 11:16 PM

Yes, just enough pressure so they get flush.

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One way to eliminate the rounded corners of the structure sheet is to use a puffy blush/cosmetics brush on the top. It would be a lot more work. I think you'd have to cut the structure sheet into individual squares and place each piece one at a time.

Currently I don't have an enrober, but that's what we did when I worked at a chocolate shop in France.

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Thanks for the tip. I have cut the texture sheets up but hadn´t heard of the brush technique. I will have to try it.

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I was at Bernard Callebaut last week and they line up the bonbons in rows 7X7 and then run under the enrober. The person at the other end puts on the transfer sheet and then with a normal 4 inch paint brush she brushed the bonbons lightly to get the sheets applied properly.

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Interesting. I've never heard of anyone using a paint brush.
Luis