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What cut is an "Applebee Riblet"?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 richw

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 09:17 AM

I have always wondered what cut of meat (from the pig) is a riblet. I ordered them from a local applebees and for the life of me could not figure it out. I originally thought they were spare ribs cut on a thin bias, but they are loaded with "chine" bone.

Any help would be appreciated!

Thanks
South Florida

#2 Oreganought

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 09:35 AM

Try http://www.ams.usda....mps/imps400.pdf

Hope this helps

#3 awbrig

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 09:35 AM

i dont know - but were they good? I know they have a all u can eat riblet promotion going on ...how many did/could you eat??

#4 stefanyb

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 10:39 AM

The "unkindest cut"

#5 sladeums

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 10:56 AM

Not sure about Applebee's, but I know that frequently 'riblet' is synonymous with featherbone.

Sounds likely from your description.
...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

#6 Margaret Pilgrim

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 03:27 PM

My husband asked the manager of an Applebee's this question, and was told that the term "riblet" is a word made up by Applebee's marketing guys, that there is no commercial cut called a riblet, nor is the cut commercially available under another name and that the cut is actually from the brisket. All I know is that my carriage trade butcher shudders at the concept, and I can't get the Chinese butchers to understand what I'm talking about. :hmmm:
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#7 sladeums

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 06:49 PM

Margaret Pilgrim posted on Aug 22 2002, 05:27 PM

...there is no commercial cut called a riblet, nor is the cut commercially available under another name and that the cut is actually from the brisket...



Couldn't you just go to the butcher and ask him/her to cut your brisket in small rib-size looking portions with the chine bone intact?(?)

Doesn't sound like an unreasonable request, does it?
...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

#8 ngatti

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 07:08 PM

Jeez i thought this was just finger meat. You know cut from between some ribs. Like the boneless ribs you get at chinese takeout places.

Nick

#9 Shiva

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 07:13 PM

No Nick, there are actual bones in the "Riblets®". I've eaten them once (never again) and they do actually contain some short flat bones.

I think the chine bone theory is probably correct. I'm picturing some factory meatcutter standing at a bandsaw with a huge tub of pork spinal columns on his left and a tub of "Riblets®" and a pile of chineless spines to his right.

Everything but the oink...

Typo and syntax corrected

#10 Fat Guy

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 09:28 PM

Try  http://www.ams.usda....mps/imps400.pdf

Hope this helps


IMPS 400-FRESH PORK PRODUCTS 29 EFFECTIVE DATE: JUNE 1997
IMPS Item No. 424 - Pork Loin, Riblet - This item is derived from the transverse processes and associated lean from the lumbar vertebrae of any IMPS bone in pork loin after removal of the tenderloin and the loin eye. Riblets shall; contain no less than 4 transverse processes (sometimes referred to as “paddle” or “finger” bones); be held intact by associated lean; and include no more than two rib bones. This item shall be trimmed practically free of surface fat.

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#11 ngatti

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Posted 23 August 2002 - 07:34 PM

Thanks Shivs, thanks FG.

Nick :smile:

#12 mynamejoe

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Posted 24 August 2002 - 12:18 AM

I must be getting slow(er). I've been following this thread, and I just now noticed this. Brisket is not a cut found on a pig, it's cut from a cow. Good thing Applebee's managers know their product. :rolleyes:

#13 Fat Guy

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Posted 24 August 2002 - 12:35 AM

Doesn't brisket just mean breast? I'm sure I've seen "pork brisket" on labels. Whether it's legit under government guidelines is another story.
Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#14 Jason Perlow

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Posted 24 August 2002 - 07:45 AM

Rachel emailed Applebees a few days ago and the manager of the local Applebees (the email got forwarded to him from Kansas City HQ) just called and said that the riblets come from along the backbone. So I guess Fat Guy was right.
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#15 heyjude

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Posted 24 August 2002 - 11:55 AM

Many years ago at the supermarket on 8th St. in the Village, they sold lamb riblets which was just the breast cut into individual unmeaty ribs at $.18 a pound. That just about fit our budget and we had them often. It's been a long time since I've even thought of cooking them. Which leads me to ask whether anyone is tempted by the Applebee's ad. There are 100's of food ads on TV from Special K to Red Lobster to Milky Ways. Do any food ads make you go out to buy the product? What has been the satisfaction level if you have?
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#16 mynamejoe

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Posted 25 August 2002 - 12:57 AM

Doesn't brisket just mean breast? I'm sure I've seen "pork brisket" on labels. Whether it's legit under government guidelines is another story.

Same general area, whichever animal you are talking about. I could see the term "brisket" being used for pig. One thing I learned about food a long time ago is to label things in a way that the everyday customer can understand.