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Pastry Ganache - Fillings and Glazes


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182 replies to this topic

#121 aidensnd

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 02:06 AM

40g 66% bittersweet chocolate (I like Guitard)

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I'm thinking perhaps you meant 40 oz?

#122 Sethro

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 03:08 AM

Yeah, heh, I edited to fix that. I also halved the recipe since I doubted anyone would want to "test" a full sheet of ganache.

#123 mrose

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 05:31 PM

I recently saw this recipe for gianduja ganache. The ingrediants are straight forward except for the addition of cocoa butter. Why are we adding more cocoa butter?

300g cream
1/2 vanillia pod
25g trimoline
75g butter
650g gianduja
80g cocoa butter
Mark
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#124 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 06:14 PM

I recently saw this recipe for gianduja ganache. The ingrediants are straight forward except for the addition of cocoa butter.  Why are we adding more cocoa butter?

300g cream
1/2 vanillia pod
25g trimoline
75g butter
650g gianduja
80g cocoa butter

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Firm it up a bit maybe?

The recipe that I put together for a gianduja truffle uses about 1/2 as much cream as gianduja, but I seem to have added a fair bit of extra bittersweet chocolate to get the texture I wanted in order to form truffles.

#125 mrose

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 06:43 PM

Kerry

That was my initial thought. This recipe might be used for molds. When you added bittersweet chocolate, did the truffle hold shape pretty well? Did you also cover it in dark chocolate?

Mark
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#126 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 07:03 PM

Kerry

That was my initial thought. This recipe might be used for molds. When you added bittersweet chocolate, did the truffle hold shape pretty well? Did you also cover it in dark chocolate?

Mark

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It held a truffle shape nicely. I also added some frangelico and a bit of glucose to help with the shelf life. Dipped in bittersweet as I recall.

It was a huge batch for a fund raising so for 250 truffles of 1 tsp each
1200 g gianduja
500 g bittersweet
625 ml cream
75 ml frangelico
50 g glucose

#127 mrose

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 07:16 PM

It sounds great, I will have to try a scaled down version. I'd love to eat some now.
Mark
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#128 mrose

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 07:42 PM

Kerry

Made these the other day & they were excellent.

MaRK
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#129 Kerry Beal

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 08:18 PM

Kerry

Made these the other day & they were excellent.

MaRK

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I have another recipe I use when I don't have any gianduja, uses hazelnut paste, bittersweet and milk chocolate. Let me know if you are interested in that one as well.

Kerry

#130 mrose

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 08:56 PM

I would be interested in that too. Always looking for good new tastes and flavors for truffles & molded candies.

Thanks
Mark
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#131 Kerry Beal

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 04:11 AM

I would be interested in that too. Always looking for good new tastes and flavors for truffles & molded candies.

Thanks
Mark

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Mark,
This one is also for 250 truffles.

400 grams butter
500 grams hazelnut paste (not the sweet version)
500 grams bittersweet chocolate
500 grams milk chocolate

This is more like the centre in guylian chocolates than a true truffle, but it scoops ok.

#132 ExtraMSG

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 04:30 AM

I make chocolate rugelach on occasion, generally just finely chopping chocolate and rolling it up in the dough. I find them a bit dry.

My thought was to use a ganache, but I was worried that it would be come too liquid and run out during cooking. Since rugelach are a cream cheese cookie, much of the fat in the dough being cream cheese, I decided to try a ganache marrying cream cheese and chocolate rather than another dairy. Didn't really work. The ganache was a nice consistency, really, but once it baked it became dried out and grainy.

Haven't tried a real ganache yet. Thought I would post here first and get some suggestions. I was thinking that a pain au chocolat/chocolate croissant filling might work, but all the recipes I see just use plain chocolate. However, I know I've had chocolate croissants where it seemed like the chocolate was almost creamy.

Suggestions?

#133 Swisskaese

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 04:38 AM

I think the ganache would run. All of the rugelach that I have eaten were made with shaved chocolate. Maybe you are overcooking the dough?

As for pain au chocolat, it is made with a stick of dark chocolate, called baton boulanger, inside the croissant dough.

#134 HQAntithesis

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 06:53 AM

Try using finely grated chocolate with eggs and bread crumbs. You can then adjust the taste with sugar, cocoa powder or whatever else you like too (vanilla essence, nut meals, etc).

#135 Desiderio

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 11:13 AM

When I made chocolate Rugelach I used the same recipe for the regular ones with apricot jelly,I used raspberry jelly and chocolate chips , cinnamon sugar and finely ground walnuts.They came out pretty good.
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#136 Pam R

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 12:34 PM

Most of the chocolate rugelach I've had use cocoa, sugar and butter/margarine. You just make a paste and spread it on. I would try it with a paste, and then sprinkle some grated chocolate over it before cutting and rolling.

#137 apronstrings

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 01:33 PM

The Baker's Catalog sells the chocolate batons for pain au chocolat. They also sell "Chocolate Shmear" which comes in a can. It's pretty good. I have been coating my raw rugelach dough with raspbery jam, and then plopping some chocolate shmear over it. Gloppy, gooey, thick, and good. They also sell an almond shmear as well.

#138 JFLinLA

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 02:24 PM

For years, I tried to come up with a chocolate filling for hamantashen similar to what you are looking for in the rugelach. The ganache failed horribly no matter how I doctored it. Now I use Nutella. I've had my eye on the "shmear" and may give that a try.
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#139 MightyD

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 06:27 AM

i need to make a milk chocolate ganache as a cake filling for a client. my regular recipe uses bittersweet chocolate - can i just substitute the bittersweet for milk chocolate? i'm concerned that the extra milk solids in milk chocolate would mess up the ganache consistency ...

help?

#140 Desiderio

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 06:47 AM

Usually the substitution is more like 2.5 of milk chocolate to 1 of cream , if your recipe calls for 2:1 Maybe you can post the formula.
Vanessa

#141 MightyD

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Posted 15 February 2007 - 08:10 PM

i use a 1:1 ratio with a bit of butter added. i guess i'll tinker around with a small batch and see what happens.

thanks!

#142 2010

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 03:28 PM

I've been doing a bit of research for interesting filling flavours for cakes and came across a cabernet cake on someone's site. It was a cabernet flavoured ganache that covered the cake. My question is, would the ganache be made with the wine in place of cream or, made as usual and have the wine added after?

Any input would be great especially a recipe. Thanks!

#143 naes

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 04:45 PM

I have never made a wine ganache, but here are my thoughts.

You should not leave out the heavy cream. Wine is mostly made of water. Have you ever added some water to melted chocolate? You end up with a thick, globby mess of seized chocolate goo. To avoid seizing the chocolate you either need to add just a little bit, which results in a slightly thicker chocolate, or you need to add a lot, which results in a thin, soupy chocolate. I have heard of some people making a strictly water-based ganache, which I have tried myself and have to say... it sucks. You really need the fat from the heavy cream to coat your mouth and provide a rich, luxurious feel. The water-based ganaches I've tried to make have been astringent and not very palatable.

However, once you've made the ganache with the heavy cream, you can add water-based flavorings without seizing the chocolate. I'd try adding the wine to an ordinary ganache and see what it tastes like. What about reducing the wine to a syrup to concentrate the flavor and minimize the water content? It would change the flavor of the wine, but it may still give you what you're looking for.

Best of luck.
Sean

(Edited to correct spelling mistakes)

Edited by naes, 23 February 2007 - 04:47 PM.


#144 Ceviz

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 02:11 PM

Sorry, but I couldn't find the relevant topic. If possible, may you give the link?

There are a lot of different chocolate/cream ratio. All the books I have give different ratios for truffles but some of them are not working for me.

So, my question is what are the golden ratios for plain bitter, milk and white ganaches for truffles for hand-rolling.

Thanks.

Edited by Ceviz, 04 March 2007 - 02:29 PM.


#145 shaloop

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 06:19 AM

I would love to know how to get that flawless finish. Also, any recipes would be appreciated. Right now I do a peanut butter cup cheesecake that is covered in ganache, but they don't have to be perfect and also I do a sort of zig-zag on top and then sprinkle on toasted, chopped peanuts, so it doesn't matter. But I'd love to be able to do larger cakes with a perfect, smooth finish on top and around the sides without spatula marks or drips. Any tips?

#146 K8memphis

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 09:33 AM

I think adding some corn syrup enhances that shiny business effect. Plus I put some butter in mine. But I'm not positive. But more people will answer especially since I said c-o-r-n s-y-r-u-p. :biggrin:

#147 aguynamedrobert

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 10:53 AM

The Glaze of all Glaze....I got this recipe from my chef in Culinary school and it will give you a brilliant shine everytime...it's thinner than most other ganaches but its shine is great....

12 oz. Butter
2 oz. Corn Syrup
1 Pound Chocolate

Dont tell anyone ;)

#148 Abra

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:09 PM

Robert, is that a warm pour over?

#149 bripastryguy

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 01:52 PM

You need to make sure that your cake is smooth first. I would mask it with a thin layer of chocolate buttercream or a whipped ganache. Chill the cake so that the "crumb coat" is firm. Place the cake on a rack and pour the warm ganache over the top. Use a offset spatula to swipe the excess off to one side, you can also tap the rack so that all the glaze can drip off the sides.
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#150 sanrensho

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Posted 18 May 2007 - 02:07 PM

It sounds like you're looking for a glacage recipe.

I haven't tried it myself, but there is a cocoa glacage recipe by pastry chef Michael Laiskonis in RecipeGullet.

http://recipes.egull...cipes/r352.html
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