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Sourdough Bread Troubleshooting (Part 1)

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#61 doronin

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 06:04 AM

You don't really need it, expecially if you are using whole flours - just leave the dough for an half hour or so before adding the salt (salt blocks the enzyme).  Rye flour also has high levels so adding 10% rye flour may help.

Hmm... don't I? Although I use whole wheat flours, I find the taste of my bread a bit too bland, and this is after 30 min of autolyze (just flour and water), and the fact that 50% of flour went to 16hours preferment...
Another thing is that my bread is kinda... firm - I can take almost paper thin slice, which I don't like, as I want it to be chewy and elastic. I thought 13.7% protein might cause it, but I also suspect it has something to do with insufficient fermentation. I'm looking for a texture similar (with whole wheat/yeast limitations) to the one in the Msk's post here: http://forums.egulle...pic=27633&st=90.

#62 jackal10

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 08:00 AM

a) To autolyse you need the yeast - autolysis refers to yeast breakdown products.

I'd need to know exactly what you recipe and technique is - sounds like you may not have enough hydration, if its that stiff. 50% preferment is also high - most formula are 30%, as too much will affect the rise, since the acid weakens the gluten.
The temperature you ferment at also affects the sourness, as will the ash content and alkalinity of the flour. Hotter (around 30C) will give sourer bread.

Whole wheats flours will always have a denser texture (and adsorb more water) since the bran particles puncture the gas cells. Some artisanal millers also add extra bran sifted from their white flour to bulk out their whole wheat flour.

You can get in France whole wheat flour that has been very finely ground so that the bran particles are as fine as the flour particles, and they give a better texture. If you have access to a home mill, run the flour through it a couple of times before use.

The protein content on wholewheat flours can be misleading, since the bran adds to the protein percentage.

Today's baguette a levain, that I'm developing. Still a long way to go before perfection. Somewhat overproved, and the dough a little wet to handle easily, but not too bad a texture for a sourdough. Shaping is lousy - the dough stuck to the couche, and the narrowness of the grigne would indicate over-proving.
Soft flour (9% protein)
75% hydration
12 hour preferment (30%) at 30C/85F

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#63 boulak

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 11:52 AM

doronin -- You are on the right track. An autolyse (autolysis, however you wish to say it) definitely does not contain yeast. It is flour and water only. It was developed by Professor Raymond Calvel in the '70s to reduce oxidation of dough by decreasing the overall mixing time. This result is a dough without excessive strength, and therefore, improved extensibility.

To discuss your bread in particular, it would be helpful if you posted your formula as jackal10 has suggested. From your description of your bread, my first guess is that it is under -hydrated, but without seeing the formula, it is only a guess.

Whole wheat flour does contain particles of bran which affect the absorption of water. My experience is that the absorption also fluctuates with the fineness of the flour as well. If the bran particles are ground finer, they might possibly have a smaller detrimental effect on the gluten. Protein content is imprortant, but more important is the quality of the protein. The prevailing school of though among bakers with whom I interact is that the bran particles cut through the gluten strands (not actually the gas cells) resulting in reduced volume.

I would highly recommend the addition of diastatic malt to your formulation. It provides more sugars for fermentaion. Especially in a dough with a long fermentation, it allows for more residual sugars during the baking process. That will not only improve flavor, but also improve the crust color (and thereby crust flavor). Experiment by adding smaller amounts and increasing the proportion gradually. I typically add .5% to 1% diastatic malt calculated on the flour in the final dough with the brand of flour I am using. I do not include it in the preferment. Have you tried searching for diastatic malt online? It should be readily available.

I agree with jackal10 in that when more levain is included in the recipe, it will result in a smaller volume of the loaf. Are you using a stiff levain or a wet levain? When using a stiff levain, I actually prefer levain in the ratio of 50% to the flour in the final recipe if baking direct (not retarding). If I am retarding the dough, I use less. When baking with a wet levain, I use 30% to 40% of levain in proportion to the flour in the final dough.

In the matter of temperature, I have found that I prefer the flavors and aromas of the bread when I maintain the dough temperture around 25 degrees Celsius. I prefer a more balanced flavor profile than flavor profile than flavors that are extremely mild or extremely sour. Bacteria and lactic acid thrive in temperatures higher, whic can result in runaway fermentation. Colder temperatures promote the production of acetic acid (sourness) and impede fermentation activity. Notice the acid blisters on a the crust of refrigerated (not retarded - which would be at a higher temperature than a refrigerator provides). This is from a build-up of acidity.

doronin, I hope that this has not confused you. As you can see from this and other threads, there are various schools of thought on the subject. It is not who is right or who is wrong, but what works for each individual.

No yeasts or bacteria were harmed in the production of this post.

#64 doronin

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Posted 15 August 2005 - 12:59 AM

My formula based on the Rustic Bread from the book by Jeffrey Hamelman, though I had to adjust water due to the fact I use whole flour.
I used 13.7% protein organic whole wheat flour, finely ground; pinch of instant yeast, 70-80% water. Stiffer preferment, 50% of all flour, fermented overnight at the counter.
Mixed in KitchenAid 3min on 1st and then 5-7min on 2nd speed.
Temperature in the room was ~25-26C in spite of working A/C.
I folded the dough twice, in 50-60 min intervals, resulting in almost 3 hours of the primary fermentation, then shaped, proofed for about 1.5h, and baked on a stone ~50min on 215C. No retarding. Oven was preheated to 275C (~528F) after I put there bread and water for steam I lowered the temperature to 215C...

As for levain - I use instant yeast, haven't try sourdough yet, and in spite of a large amount of the preferment, there is no sour taste at all (I'd love to have some, but I guess this is Sourdough's territory)

Edited by doronin, 15 August 2005 - 01:06 AM.


#65 jackal10

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Posted 15 August 2005 - 02:11 AM

Bread doughs with yeast, especially instant yeast, behave differently from sourdoughs. You won't get the sour taste, as there is little lactobacilli present. Since there is little acid, the gluten doesn't degrad as much with time. Hamelin's recipe adds more yeast at the dough making stage, bulk ferments for 2 1/2 hours and proofs for 75-90 mins
He says "The dough should be supple and moderately loose". If you follow these instructions, you should get OK bread even with wholemeal flour, but it will have typical wholemeal texture, rather than the open texture you get with white flour. It will also take more water to get a moderately loose dough. You might want to follow Henelins whole wheat bread on p 122. However he uses 50% white bread flour to lighten the loaf.

Sourdough is a complex symbiosis of a yeasts and lactobacilli.
If you want sour then you need to start your own starter. Its easy. Just take equal weights of flour and water mixed to a batter, and leave covered in a warm (30C) place until its bubbles, about 3 days. Then throw out 2/3rds and add equal quantities of flour and water again and leave until bubbly, about 8 hours. You can use it then, or refresh (add more flour and water) a couple of times more to ensure you have the right culture. Once ready, it will keep in the fridge almost indefinately.
Dan Lepard's book "The Handmade Loaf" has good pictures of this process. Do not be tempted to add yeast, grapes, sugar or the like as they will encourge the wrong culture. You can add some rye, but it is not strictly necessary.
Sourdough works much more slowly than normal yeast.

Edited by jackal10, 15 August 2005 - 02:12 AM.


#66 CRUZMISL

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 10:15 PM

I made my first sourdough loaf today. I find it much more tempermental than recipes that use commercially available yeast.

It had super crisp crust and a wonderful sour flavor but not too strong. It's more work but worth it. Can't wait for toast tomorrow morning :biggrin:

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#67 Rebecca263

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 10:17 PM

Wow, beautiful! Did you make the starter from scratch?
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#68 CRUZMISL

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:29 PM

Wow, beautiful! Did you make the starter from scratch?

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I was going to but decided to order the starter from KA. Much easier and I had to order some other baking supplies anyway.

Tomorrow is a pugliese loaf. We'll see how that turns out.

Edited by CRUZMISL, 26 January 2006 - 11:29 PM.


#69 Rebecca263

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 11:48 PM

OK, dear. Send me the crusts! :wub:
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#70 danlepard

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 01:24 AM

Excellent, what a great crust - I think I can spy a few little blisters on the surface, always a good sign. Not too much flour on the surface, another good thing. Very impressive.
Dan

#71 slbunge

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 06:03 AM

Agreed. That is a fantastic looking crust. Nice even color. Also, very nice shape. When I make sourdough I sometimes get odd shapes, like a blow-out at one of the locations where I have scored the loaf. Not sure if it is an indication of hot-spots or a problem with technique.

Well done.
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#72 jackal10

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 06:41 AM

Stehen:
The blow-outs are typical of baking from cold. Unless the loaf is evenly made and scored the extra oven rise will tend to blow out the centre. You might find letting the dough warm up some before you bake helps, however this will make the dough less stiff, and you should allow less intial proof time as the dough will prove somewhat warming up.

#73 joaquin

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 07:31 AM

Did you use rice flour to get that dusting effect on the crust?

#74 CRUZMISL

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 12:32 PM

Did you use rice flour to get that dusting effect on  the crust?

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No. It's standard AP flour. The dough was risen in a linen lined collander(sp?)

#75 glennbech

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 12:13 AM

- In a dough with about, let's say, 1 kg og flour. Is there a magic formula to determine how much refreshed starter / sponge to make? Can I compensate for a small sponge by bulk fermenting the bread longer ?

- In norway the supermarket flour contains 10,7 % protein. This is gluten right ?
Is it protein content that determines the water absorbtion abilty of a flour ? Is this what is refered to as "strength" ? Or are we talking about how fine the wheat is milled ? How does this attributes affect the bread ?

- How much oven spring can I rely on getting from a dough? Let's say I bulk ferment my dough for 5 hours, shape the loaves (they will collapse a bit during this process), and put them straigh into the oven. Will the bread rise at all ?

- I've seen vitamin C in some recipes. What's the right way, and reason to apply witamin C in bread baking ?

- I have some recipes on wholegrain soursoigh breads, and bread with a coarser ground flour. Can I use my nice and acitve fiine starter for these breads ? The recipe states to use another starter. (From rye). Is this only for taste ? Will the bread rise just as well with a fine flour starter ?

Hope someone can help me shed some ligh on this magic .-)

#76 jackal10

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 03:28 AM

I'm sure other and better experts will join in but here is my understanding:


- In a dough with about, let's say, 1 kg of flour. Is there a magic formula to determine how much refreshed starter / sponge to make? Can I compensate for a small sponge by bulk fermenting the bread longer ?


Most bread formula are in terms of Bakers, percentages, that is relative to total flour.
Different bakers have different formulas. The amount of levan can vary from typically 20% to over 200% (200% means half the flour is in the levan).

A typical formula for white bread might be:

Liquid levan:
Flour 20% (200g)
Water 20% (200g)
Mother starter 1% (10g)

Ferment for 8-12 hours at 30C

Dough
All the levan 40% (400g)
Flour 80% (800g)
Water 45% (450g )
Salt 2% (20g)

This formula has 65% hydration with the water in the levan. Varying the amount of water by small amounts will make big changes to the viscosity of the dough and hence its ease of handling, and to a lesser extent the hole size in the finished dough. Don't forget the dough will get much wetter as ferments and proves, as the acid attacks the starch and converts them to sugars.
Different flours adsorb differnt amounts of water. Wholemeal will adsorb more, say 55%/550g/75% hydration.

You can compensate for a smaller sponge by fermenting longer, but it will make a different bread. There are many different processes happening, and very long fermentation stages tend to weaken the gluten. Crudely, I think the sponge step develops the flavour, and dough step the texture.

- In norway the supermarket flour contains 10,7 % protein. This is gluten right ?
Is it protein content that determines the water absorbtion abilty of a flour ? Is this what is refered to as "strength" ? Or are we talking about how fine the wheat is milled ? How does this attributes affect the bread ?


I'm sure that flour will make fine bread. I think here is often too much emphasis on the exact paramters of the flour, since technique is more important. Better to choose one or two typed of flour you can easily obtain, and work with those. Oneof the problems is that millers and supermarkets do not always supply an identical product: the same flour packet may contain subtly different flour in the spring or the autumn, or on damp days and dry days.

You raise a large subject here, and if you can, go and find books on cereal chemistry. Flour is complex stuff, and there are many more parameters than just protein content, which is used as a surrogate for gluten. although it says nothing about the quality of gluten, and can be misleading for wholemeal flours since the bran contains protein. The amount of gluten is often referred to as strength, but you can (and I do) make good bread from weak flour. In France baguettes are made with weak flour. Each culture has ended to evolve local breads that make best use of the flour locally grown and available.

Other parameters people measure. Many of these interact, and none really tell you what the flour is like to bake with:
Moisture content
Colour
Grade of grind and particle size
Milling temperature
Milling method
Wheat variety and type (spring/winter etc)
Extraction (percentage of the whole wheat)
Enzyme content
Hagberg Falling number (measure of amylase activity)
Gel protein test
Damaged strach granules (Farrand units)
Water adsobption (Farinograph)

In France and Germany ash content is quoted, used as an indication of mineral content.

- How much oven spring can I rely on getting from a dough? Let's say I bulk ferment my dough for 5 hours, shape the loaves (they will collapse a bit during this process), and put them straight into the oven. Will the bread rise at all ?


My loaves more than double in the oven. I get bigger final volume from less expansion in the feremention and proof stage and more oven spring.
Try and see what happens if you bake directly after shaping. You will certainly get some rise.
Retardation (putting the bread in the fridge) is another issue, The cold slows some proceses more than others. I reckon (for me) overnight int e fridge is about equivalent to two hours proof, and sometimes I shape, put the dough in the fridge, and then bake next day from cold.

- I've seen vitamin C in some recipes. What's the right way, and reason to apply witamin C in bread baking ?


Another complex subject. Vitamin C combines with the help of an oxidase enzyme present in the flour wih the oxygen in the dough to form dehydroascorbic acid, which then oxidises anothe enzyme in the flour that would otherwise attack the gluten, and also appears to assist forming the bonds inthe gluten structure.

Its more important for freshly milled flour, and for high intensity mixed doughs. If you are mixing by hand its less important - people have made fine bread for years without it. Some bread flours (King Arthur, for instance) have it already mixed in at the millers - check the fine print on the packet.

You can just add it when you make the dough. I'm experimenting with some success with mixing the dough flour, water and vitamin C together and letting them stand for about an hour beforehand.

I have some recipes on wholegrain sourdough breads, and bread with a coarser ground flour. Can I use my nice and acitve fine starter for these breads ? The recipe states to use another starter. (From rye). Is this only for taste ? Will the bread rise just as well with a fine flour starter ?



Absolutely. I only maintain one basic white starter that I use for all my breads. A baker I know just maintains a rye mother starter that he uses for all his breads, so that he can make gluten free breads without changing starter.


Hope someone can help me shed some ligh on this magic .-)




Hope this helps and welcome to a great adventure. Please don't take these remarks as gospel. They are only my current opinion, and you should not beleive everything you read on the Internet!

Jack

Edited by jackal10, 23 April 2006 - 09:38 AM.


#77 Desiderio

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 09:11 AM

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Since we talk again about sourdough I have a question as well.
I am in Colorado so high altitude, I just bought some different flour, I use to buy the bread flour ( but doesnt say the % of protein),its the hungarian type for high altitude.Now I have noticed a hugeee difference using this flour,it assorbs sooo much water its impressive, I had to add water till was at the right consistency and was way more than the recepie called for.
Has this flour a very high protein contenent? It doesnt say on the package ( wich it drives me crazy ) but it says thta is made for the high altitude and has a good amount of protein ( how much who knows :hmmm: ).
Now is this a good sign for a bread flour , I know it depends probably form what you want to attain,I like very crusty rustic breads like the italian ( I miss the good bread form my home country ), the first I made with sourdough came out decent at first I thought was too heavy the crumb to dense and the crust too thin, with few days it got much better , it losts a lot of the water form the crum wich made it better and less dense , if it makes sense , and the flavor definally increased positivaly.Anyway I am wondering if this flour is good or not for good sourdough bread making.
Let me know thank you :smile:
Vanessa

#78 qrn

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 12:20 PM

<
<Has this flour a very high protein contenent? It doesnt say on the package ( wich <it drives me crazy ) but it says thta is made for the high altitude and has a good <amount of protein ( how much who knows :hmmm: ).

Yes it does say on the package...Look at the box with the nutrition facts...
The serving size is usually 30g and below it shows protein in grams, if protein is 3 grams its 10%...Hungarian "high altitude " is just ordinary a/p flour, there is no need for "high altitude" flour Just don't over proof or the loaves blow up.

Bud

#79 Desiderio

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Posted 23 April 2006 - 03:02 PM

<
<Has this flour a very high protein contenent? It doesnt say on the package ( wich <it drives me crazy ) but it says thta is made for the high altitude and has a good <amount of protein ( how much who knows  :hmmm: ).

Yes it does say on the package...Look at the box with the nutrition facts...
The serving size is usually 30g  and below it shows protein in grams, if protein is 3 grams its 10%...Hungarian "high altitude " is just ordinary a/p flour, there is no need for "high altitude" flour  Just don't over proof or the loaves blow up.

Bud

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Ahhh thank you I know I was missing something :wacko:
Thank you Bud
Vanessa

#80 sirch1980

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 05:50 AM

[/QUOTE]- In a dough with about, let's say, 1 kg og flour. Is there a magic formula to determine how much refreshed starter / sponge to make? Can I compensate for a small sponge by bulk fermenting the bread longer ?[QUOTE]

The dough ferment time depend on how much starter add in the recipe. small portion longer time. large portion less time. U can not use large portion starter to ferment the dough for long time. it will over ferment. And water temp u use in the dough that u need to decide how long will u ferment. Because 1 hour will rise 2F degree inside the dough. normally My ideal dough temp is 75F degree because more time ferment, longer shelf life , deeper taste.

[QUOTE]- In norway the supermarket flour contains 10,7 % protein. This is gluten right ?
Is it protein content that determines the water absorbtion abilty of a flour ? Is this what is refered to as "strength" ? Or are we talking about how fine the wheat is milled ? How does this attributes affect the bread ?[/QUOTE]

Strength flour is made from the entire endosperm that contain 13% to 15% of protein.
10.7 % protein that u can call top patent flour, but normally 11% to 13% in north america.

[QUOTE]- How much oven spring can I rely on getting from a dough? Let's say I bulk ferment my dough for 5 hours, shape the loaves (they will collapse a bit during this process), and put them straigh into the oven. Will the bread rise at all ?[/QUOTE]

Normally I proofed to almost double size of the dough, then go to bake with steam for 5 to 10 min and open the door release the steam.

[QUOTE]- I've seen vitamin C in some recipes. What's the right way, and reason to apply witamin C in bread baking ?[/QUOTE]

vitamin C is make the gluten more elastic. Manufactory will also add this for make "no time dough".

[QUOTE]- I have some recipes on wholegrain soursoigh breads, and bread with a coarser ground flour. Can I use my nice and acitve fiine starter for these breads ? The recipe states to use another starter. (From rye). Is this only for taste ? Will the bread rise just as well with a fine flour starter ? [/QUOTE]

Every bread can use starter method , sponge method and old dough method.
use rye flour will smaller than fine flour.
if u want to change rye flour to bread flour in same weight is ok.
but u can't change bread flour to rye in same weight in the recipe. because rye less gluten, so rye flour normally 25% to 40% in total % of the flour.

#81 glennbech

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 01:40 PM

Thanks a lot sirch1980. The tips regarding rye substitution was very helpfull.

Now... Experimenting a an "express sourdough" ( I want to see If I can cram a baking session 7 hours in between end of work at 17.00, and bedtime, around 00:00)

What is better; Long bulk fermentation, or longer proofing? If we consider two aproaches, where only 7 hours is available.

A) 3 hours starter refresh, 1 hour bulk fermentation and 3 hour proofing.

or

B) 3 hours starter refresh, 3 hour bulk fermentation and 1 hours of proofing.

Im doing this experiemnt right now, So I guess we'll soon enough see if 7 hours will produce good bread .-)

Edited by glennbech, 24 April 2006 - 02:11 PM.


#82 SweetSide

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 01:54 PM

Thanks a lot sirch1980. The tips regarding rye substitution was very helpfull.

Now... Experimenting a an "express sourdough" ( I want to see If I can cram a baking session 7 hours in between end of work at 17.00, and bedtime, around 00:00)

What is better; Long bulk fermentation, or longer proofing? If we consider two aproaches, where only 7 hours is available. 

A) 3 hours starter refresh, 3 hours bulk fermentation and 1 hour proofing.

or

B) 3 hours starter refresh, 3 hour bulk fermentation and 1 hours of proofing.

Im doing this experiemnt right now, So I guess we'll soon enough see if 7 hours will produce good bread .-)

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Ummm... Looks like options A and B are the same to me.... Except for some s's...
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#83 glennbech

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Posted 24 April 2006 - 02:13 PM

Should have been....

A) 3 hours starter refresh, 1 hour bulk fermentation and 3 hour proofing.

or

B) 3 hours starter refresh, 3 hour bulk fermentation and 1 hours of proofing.

#84 jackal10

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 12:20 AM

You'd do better to do it in two steps
a) 8-12 hour make the sponge (before you leave for work)
b) mix, bulk ferment 1 hour, proof for 1-2 hours, depending on temperaure, bake 40 mins. This assumes you are using abou 33% of he flour in the recipe inthe sponge.
If you use half hat (say 16%) double the proof time.

#85 glennbech

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:07 AM

Yeah... Sponge devleopment while I'm at work. Should have thought of that one .-)

While we're at it; I guess the sponge/dough ratio affect how sour the bread gets? . As well as how much starter there is in the sponge, and how long you let it ferment?)

Mm... I guess I have a lot to learn. Yesterday, I experimented with a sponge, with equal amounts of starter/flour/water and short fermentation time. ( 3 hours). However, I ended up with a sponge of 450g, and a total dough weight of 700. That was really sour bread ! .-)

The taste, crumb and crust were not bad though.

Tomorrow, I'll try a sponge that is 30% of total flour weight, with a small amount of starter, and leave it while at work. I'll Proof/ferment as you suggest. I'll be back with the results!

Another thing ; I'm getting tired of handling doughs at > 70% hydration levels. They're so sticky. Do you get real big holes and soft crumb at 60-65% hydration ?

Thanks again all for excellent feedback.

#86 jackal10

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Posted 25 April 2006 - 02:18 AM

Yes, I get big holes at 66% hydration. Very wet doughs give large holes, but have thick webs, and a more pudding like texture. If you get full gluten development the webs are much thinner as well.

There are three seperate processes going on, all with different dynamics: gluten development, conversion of the starches to sugars (which also makes the dough wetter as it proves), and gas production. The bakers art is to optimise them.

#87 sirch1980

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 12:29 AM

use high gluten flour will much better,because more protein in the flour can adsorb more water.

And if u punching down the dough more times, the hold will more regular and dense

#88 glennbech

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 04:24 PM

More issues As I continue my sourdough experiments ;

A) In today's batch. one bread was burnty while the other was not. How is this possible ? Both of them are in direct contact with my Pizza stone that is at bottom of my electric oven.

I guess it was burned because of hight temp. Right now I'm warming my oven to 482F/250C... I might reduce this to 230C ? How one escaped this faith, but not the other amazes me.

B) Dough WILL Stick to a floured linnen cloth in a basket !! Why didn't anyone tell me this ? *grin* Will I need a "professional" battenton.. (Spelled correctly?) where can I buy those?

C) I measured 34 degrees C in my kitchen at some point when the doigh were proofing.... How will this affect the result ?

Any ideas ?

#89 Bill44

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Posted 26 April 2006 - 06:29 PM

More issues As I continue my sourdough experiments ;

A) In today's batch. one bread was burnty while the other was not. How is this possible ? Both of them are in direct contact with my Pizza stone that is at bottom of my electric oven.

I guess it was burned because of hight temp. Right now I'm warming my oven to 482F/250C... I might reduce this to 230C ? How one escaped this faith, but not the other amazes me.

B) Dough WILL Stick to a floured linnen cloth in a basket !! Why didn't anyone tell me this ? *grin* Will I need a "professional" battenton.. (Spelled correctly?) where can I buy those?

C) I measured 34 degrees C in my kitchen at some point when the doigh were proofing.... How will this affect the result ?

Any ideas ?

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A) Lift your stone to about 4-5 inches from the bottom of the stove. Try 215C for 45 minutes.
B) The gluten in white flour will stick to a cloth, use rye flour.
C) It will speed up your proofing, and Lactobaccilus likes the higher temperatures so you will have a different taste to say 25C.
regards
Bill
Kind regards
Bill

#90 Beanie

Beanie
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  • Location:Mohawk Valley, upstate NY

Posted 26 April 2006 - 07:12 PM

Rice flour also works well. Use alot of it. A professional banneton still needs to be floured.
Ilene





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