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Jack's Birthday Bash


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#1 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 03:42 AM

Last night's dinner.
My partner says this is showing off, but so be it.
Multiple graphic intensive posts. I'm also a little hung-over, so there will be typos...
Please ask if you need any recipes or more details. Share and enjoy!

First: mise en scene

We are eating in the kitchen...
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Interested onlooker, just outside the windows (no, we are not having pheasent)
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Ready...
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The wines:

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Not shown (chilling in the fridge):
1998 Champagne Jacquart Brut Mosaique Millesime
Brilliant straw-yellow hue with a lively mousse. Melon, pear and yeast aromas. Medium-full with good weight on the palate, this has ripe fruit, nice length in the finish and a lively streak of acidity. 94 points (Tastings.com)

1991 Domaine Zind Humbrecht Gewurztraminer Heimbourg
The Gewurztraminers are stunning in 1991..... It is spectacular, with full-bodied flavors, and a perfumed, intense aroma 93 points (Parker)

1990 Château Batailley Pauillac
Beautiful wine. Very dark ruby-red. Wonderful blackberry, mineral and violet aromas. Full-bodied, with round and velvety tannins and a long, beautifully fruity finish 92 points (Wine Spectator)
I laid down a case en primeur - now time to start drinking them.

1989 Clos de Ste Catherine Coteaux du Layon
I'm very fond of these old sweet Loire wines, now drying a little. Sweet, unctuous but not cloying 91 points (Parker)

1977 Grahams Port
Deep purple-ruby, with intense floral, cassis and prune aromas, full-bodied, with plenty of fruitand extremely hard tannins. (90 WS)
)

Edited by jackal10, 13 January 2007 - 07:13 AM.


#2 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 03:53 AM

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1. Amuse 1: Foie Gras Truffee, Champagne Jelly, Smoked Salt, Cracked pepper, Spelt toast.

The champagne jelly was following a recent thread, with gold leaf to provide sparkle:
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Sourdough spelt miche:
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Toast (handed seperately) Should have made more
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Ready to go:
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#3 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 03:59 AM

2 Amuse 2:
Pan fried scallops, Beurre Noisette, Black Truffle, Hot cucumber, Roast Cauliflower puree
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The truffle were shaved at table. They were chinese truffles http://chinesetruffle.com/, otherwise not affordable. The Beurre noisette was reinforced with some truffle oil.

#4 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 04:13 AM

Amuse 3: Stuffed pig's trotter, Jerusalem artichoke puree, coffee and garlic warm jelly.

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Pig;s trotter is stuffed with a fine chicken mousseline, more truffle, pied de mouton and trumpet de mort mushroom, then sliced.

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The coffe and garlic agar gell was inspired by Peter Barham's lecture: http://www.katho.be/...ie/index-en.asp

Its one of those combinations that comes from looking for common chemicals.
tasts ort of like deep, slightly bitter garlic.
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#5 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 04:17 AM

4. Chicken soup, baby thyme, onion and parsely dumplings

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The soup is a reduced consomme.

#6 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 04:22 AM

5. Fillet of Sole Florentine.

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Poached turban of Dover sole, Spinch Puree, Mornay (cheese - PArmesan and Gruyere) sauce, Macaroni cheese.

Classic Cuisine, straight out of Escoffier, but modern presentation.

Edited by jackal10, 13 January 2007 - 04:23 AM.


#7 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 04:26 AM

6. Apple and champagne foam

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Has to be foam somewhere

#8 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 04:42 AM

7. Slow roast rib of beef

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The beef is local Dexter, hung for 28 days, 12 hour roast in a 60C oven final temperature 57C.

Served with
Baby Yorkshire puddings

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Honey glazed carrots
Maple syrup glazed parsnips
Roast Exquisa potatoes
Sprouts and Chestnuts
Broccoli
Balsmic roast shallots
Demi glace jus.

These were served at table. Plating and photography getting a bit shaky under the influence of alcohol..

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#9 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 05:28 AM

8: Cold sweet: Trifle (by special request)
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#10 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 05:30 AM

10 Hot Sweet: Crepes Suzette

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The flames haven't come out in the picture

#11 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 05:34 AM

11: Cheese: Vacherin Mont d'or; Aged Cheddar

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Onion and sultana bread

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#12 Chufi

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 05:45 AM

Last night's dinner.
My partner says this is showing off, but so be it.

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isn't that what eGullet is for? :smile:
happy birthday, and that is one stunningly beautiful dinner. How long did it take you to cook all that.. and did you have help?
The 3 amuses alone would be an excellent dinner!

the golden jelly is just gorgeous.

edited to add: just saw course # 12.. that was a LOT of food!

Edited by Chufi, 13 January 2007 - 05:48 AM.


#13 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 05:47 AM

12: Coffee, walnuts, clemantines,
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Chocolate truffles, dates, marron glace, prune fourre (or what was left by the time I took the photo) etc

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#14 miladyinsanity

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 06:04 AM

I was very full before I peeked in this thread.

Now I'm very hungry.

Bravo, Jack!
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#15 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 06:11 AM

Thank you Chufi.
I must admit we were a bit full towards the end, even though the portions were doll size.

I made the stocks and the demi-glace at the weekend
I made the breads Wednesday. Sourdough improves with a couple of days standing.
Thursday was shopping and most of the prep.
Friday afternoon was the cooking from about 3pm on.
Fabien (fabpe here) helped on Friday. He is much more precise and visual than I am, and his plating is much better.
We sat down at 7.15pm, and the party broke up about midnight, since various people had things to do and planes to catch early next day
My partner Jill made the trifle, and bless her, did most of the clearing up, which took until about 3am.
We are both moving slowly today...

#16 Marlene

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 06:56 AM

Very nicely done Jack! I'd be interested in learning more about the making of the champagne jelly (brilliant use of gold leaf) and the apple champagne foam. And the picture shows a Grahams port, not a Warre?
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#17 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 07:30 AM

Very nicely done Jack!  I'd be interested in learning more about the making of the champagne jelly (brilliant use of gold leaf) and the apple champagne foam.  And the picture shows a Grahams port, not a Warre?

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Thanks I said I was not awake when I wrote that. Now corrected.

Champagne jelly (from the thread)

Make a simple syrup with 50g sugar dissolved in 50g water, warmed to dissolve
Soften 3 sheets of gelatine in it and stir until dissolved
Mix in 375ml (half a bottle) of champagne
Pour into a half size baking tray lined with clingfilm.
Fleck the surface with edible gold leaf, It doesn't take much - thie used about one sheet say 2inch x 2inch, maybe $2 worth, but you can buy ready cut petals,
Let set overnight in the fridge
Slice into small cubes (brunoise)

Apple and Champagne foam

250ml apple juice
125ml Champagne (drink the rest)
Juice of a lemon
75g sugar
10g Apple Jack
4 leaves gelatine

Mix all together, except the champagne and dissolve the gelatine in the warm liquid.
Add the champagne.
Put into an ISI whipper and charge with 2 cartridges gas. Needs to be at room temperature or slightly warm, otherwise it sets.
Put into shot glasses. Once dispensed it will hold only for a few minutes,

Edited by jackal10, 13 January 2007 - 07:38 AM.


#18 joesan

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 08:24 AM

Very nice Jack. Your bread looked great as usual. I think the Foie and jelly looked amazing. And your consomme looks delicious.

Was the Garlic and Coffee jelly good? I find the pairing slightly jarring though I love anything that's "agared" up!

Well done - shame your guests didn't stay a little later. If I was served that meal I'd still be there today. :biggrin:

#19 docsconz

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 08:37 AM

Certainly a birthday meal to remember! I too am curious as to how the coffee and garlic jelly turned out. Was this a "big one" or just a run-of-the-mill birthday? :wink:
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#20 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 08:53 AM

It was just an ordinary birthday.

The coffee and garlic was good but needs work. I think I made the coffee too dominant in this application - it re-inforces the garlic.
Peter Barham's example was a garlic creme, with an expresso poured over. Cream would have helped, and made the oil soluble garlic flavour better.
He also remarked that garlic and chocolate is horrible, but garlic/coffee/chocolate delicious.

#21 forever_young_ca

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 09:05 AM

Happy Birthday - what a great way to celebrate.

I will definately try the champagne jelly recipe - a way to add some sparkle and pizzaz............
Life is short, eat dessert first

#22 markk

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 09:36 AM

Wow. What a great dinner and what a great post! Thanks. And of course Happy Birthday !!
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#23 kutsu

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 09:37 AM

Looks great Jack.

How did you find the truffles? Any sort of good truffle flavour comming out of them, and did you order direct?

Cheers
John

p.s - Happy Birthday!!

#24 racheld

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 09:50 AM

Incredibly beautiful to my sleepy eyes this morning---what a lovely way to celebrate!!

I "do" everybody's birthday, and especially enjoy doing my own. Never anything on that scale of difficulty or proportion, but I loved seeing your presentations and imagining the tastes, course after course.

Chris just passed behind me as I was looking at the beef, and as I scrolled down, he said, "Whoa!!! Go back to that roast!"

Just wonderful, and Happy Birthday.
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#25 docsconz

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 09:57 AM

It was just an ordinary birthday.

The coffee and garlic was good but needs work. I think I made the coffee too dominant in this application - it re-inforces the garlic.
Peter Barham's example was a garlic creme, with an expresso poured over. Cream would have helped, and made the oil soluble garlic flavour better.
He also remarked that garlic and chocolate is horrible, but garlic/coffee/chocolate delicious.

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If that was for "just an ordinary birthday", I'm not sure I have the capability of imagining what you might do for a "special" one. :laugh: Nice.
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

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#26 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 10:15 AM

Looks great Jack.

How did you find the truffles? Any sort of good truffle flavour comming out of them, and did you order direct?

Cheers
John

p.s - Happy Birthday!!

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The truffles were in the local market, on the same stall that sold the wild mushrooms. They were around $50/kg, compared with something like $2000/kg for French ones.Internal texture and colour are identical to European truffle but only a faint hint of flavour - you get some of that truffle smell when you first open the closed container they were stored in the fridge but its very elusive. Apparently you can tell the difference if you look very closely at the surface pits,
I put truffle oil in the butter to compensate

Edited by jackal10, 13 January 2007 - 10:19 AM.


#27 Daniel

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 10:16 AM

Looks awesome.. Happy birthday and congrats..

#28 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 10:34 AM

Very impressive, Jack! Happy birthday and may you live and cook til you are 120 years old! Mazal tov on your culinary abilities and thanks for the terrific photographs! :wink:
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#29 insomniac

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 10:42 AM

Happy birthday Jack, gorgeous; where did you get the Dexter?

#30 jackal10

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Posted 13 January 2007 - 11:02 AM

Happy birthday Jack, gorgeous; where did you get the Dexter?

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Cruickshanks in Comberton, my local butcher. Excellent people.
I ordered it before Xmas, and they held it for me.
They are accredited by http://www.rbst.org....s-meat/main.php

P & S Cruickshank
10 South Street
Comberton
Cambridge. CB3 7DZ
Tel: +44 (0)1223 262212

As it happens they graze on a farm near my house.
I might just have to have a beef sandwich (on spelt bread) for supper...

Edited by jackal10, 13 January 2007 - 11:05 AM.