Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

"Making Artisan Chocolates" by Andrew Shotts

Confections Chocolate

  • Please log in to reply
173 replies to this topic

#61 bonbonman

bonbonman
  • legacy participant
  • 19 posts

Posted 08 February 2007 - 12:32 PM

hey duck, as in the recipe, i use sel de guerande which has about 20% to 28% less sodium than table or kosher salt so that may be why it is salty...try a fleur de sel...i am happy to hear you are having success...boston globe wrote it up today, she butchered the grand marnier though....

#62 duckduck

duckduck
  • participating member
  • 946 posts
  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 08 February 2007 - 02:26 PM

I have two...one is a fleur de sel guerande and the other says just sel de guerande. I used the fleur de sel. It may just be me. Everyone else liked it.
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#63 bonbonman

bonbonman
  • legacy participant
  • 19 posts

Posted 08 February 2007 - 06:43 PM

guerande has less sodium than just "fleur de sel" as it is unrefined and is dried by the wind... a true guerande has the smell of the ocean and is moist in the bag...some producers of "fleur de sel" can't have the same health claims as a guerande producer ...yes there are health claims....there is a lot of info on salt out there so i will not start a new topic as it will be flagged and placed in another egullet universe...just thought you might want to know...i appreciate your interest....drew....

www.garrisonconfections.com
www.notterschool.com

#64 duckduck

duckduck
  • participating member
  • 946 posts
  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 09 February 2007 - 12:32 PM

guerande has less sodium than just "fleur de sel" as it is unrefined and is dried by the wind... a true guerande has the smell of the ocean and is moist in the bag...some producers of "fleur de sel" can't have the same health claims as a guerande producer ...yes there are health claims....there is a lot of info on salt out there so i will not start a new topic as it will be flagged and placed in another egullet universe...just thought you might want to know...i appreciate your interest....drew....

www.garrisonconfections.com
www.notterschool.com

View Post


Healthy benefits in caramel? Works for me, Babe! :biggrin: "Just packin' in the nurtrients here." (Said with mouth full.)
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#65 Skwerl

Skwerl
  • participating member
  • 114 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 12 February 2007 - 11:35 AM

Humblest apologies for temporarily hijacking this thread, but it was suggested I post here to catch the attention of Mr. Schotts. I’m having trouble locating the Apple Essence product required for the candied apple ganache. Nor have I found natural apple oil to use in its place- only nasty green apple flavoring. Do you know of a mail order/on-line source where we civilians would be able to find either of those? I love the book so far, and this is one of the filling flavors in which I am most interested! Thanks in advance!
Josh Usovsky
"Will Work For Sugar"

#66 bonbonman

bonbonman
  • legacy participant
  • 19 posts

Posted 12 February 2007 - 05:34 PM

I will be honest, I use the apple essence that is used for jolly ranchers and blow pops. Hey, people love it. A candy making supply house should have it. I use one that only comes in large volume. I hope this helps.
Drew

#67 Skwerl

Skwerl
  • participating member
  • 114 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 13 February 2007 - 08:05 AM

Thanks so much for the speedy reply, Drew. Is it green apple flavoring? Large volume, eh? Sounds like I'll be making apple ganache, apple sorbet, apple ice cream, apple taffy, apple hard candy, apple gianduja, apple jaconde, apple caramel, apple caramel apples, apple yogurt, apple mashed potatoes, applemeringue, apple... Oh, my poor friends...
Josh Usovsky
"Will Work For Sugar"

#68 mrose

mrose
  • participating member
  • 410 posts
  • Location:Franklin, WI

Posted 13 February 2007 - 09:16 AM

Has anyone tried the Lime - Pastis? I want to try it but a bottle of Pastis costs `$20. A lot for just 1 tbsp until I know if I like the taste?

Mark
Mark
www.roseconfections.com

#69 xdrixn

xdrixn
  • participating member
  • 231 posts

Posted 13 February 2007 - 09:28 AM

it tastes like pernod with a subtle touch of herbs.
www.adrianvasquez.net

#70 John DePaula

John DePaula
  • participating member
  • 1,495 posts
  • Location:Portland, OR

Posted 13 February 2007 - 10:38 AM

A lot of liquor stores have the tiny little one shot bottles - the kind you see on airlines.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#71 Skwerl

Skwerl
  • participating member
  • 114 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 13 February 2007 - 10:48 AM

I thought it might take some work to find pastis where I live, so I tested using a little anise extract instead. It's a very nice flavor combination, so now I have no qualms about doing the footwork to find pastis. I slowly added miniscule amounts of the extract until I thought the flavor was right. This might be an adequate experiment for you to use to test its palatability.
Josh Usovsky
"Will Work For Sugar"

#72 mrose

mrose
  • participating member
  • 410 posts
  • Location:Franklin, WI

Posted 13 February 2007 - 10:52 AM

John

Not where I live, I have been looking for a bottle like that of Galliano (licorice flavored Liquor). Live in a small city.

Mark
Mark
www.roseconfections.com

#73 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,308 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 February 2007 - 10:53 AM

Has anyone tried the Lime - Pastis? I want to try it but a bottle of Pastis costs `$20. A lot for just 1 tbsp until I know if I like the taste?

Mark

View Post


I made it subbing white Sambuca and it's been well received.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#74 duckduck

duckduck
  • participating member
  • 946 posts
  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 13 February 2007 - 11:08 AM

I'm planning on going for the tequila sometime this week. The guys at work are eagerly waiting! And welcome back Skwerl! It's good to see you! :raz:
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#75 mrose

mrose
  • participating member
  • 410 posts
  • Location:Franklin, WI

Posted 13 February 2007 - 12:07 PM

Anna

What flavor is white Sambuca?

Mark
Mark
www.roseconfections.com

#76 Anna N

Anna N
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,308 posts
  • Location:Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 February 2007 - 12:45 PM

Anna

What flavor is white Sambuca?

Mark

View Post


Tasting note from the LCBO:
"Clear water white; big black licorice aroma; smooth anice & herbs in flavour, sweetness balanced by alcohol to finish."
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#77 Skwerl

Skwerl
  • participating member
  • 114 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:25 PM

Thanks so much for the welcomes, Pam and John! Work, school, remodeling and selling a house, moving, and something like a divorce have kept me really busy this past 18 months. My temperer and I have been spending a lot of time together now that things have quieted down. I now live not even a block away from Christopher Elbow's shop, so he's a constant inspiration every time I drive by on my way home. I have chocolate fever again, so I'll be hanging around here a lot more often now. :biggrin:

Back on topic, sort of, did anyone else notice that the recipes in Andrew's book all call for glucose or corn syrup (I forget which, exactly) instead of invert sugar? Perhaps this was just an effort to help the home cook, but now that I keep Nulomoline on-hand, I would prefer to use it. Can I substitute Nulomoline ounce for ounce, or is it not that simple?
Josh Usovsky
"Will Work For Sugar"

#78 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,614 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:49 PM

Glucose is not as sweet as sucrose, whereas invert sugar is sweeter than sucrose. So if you were to substitute you would need to take that into account. I'll do a bit more research this evening and post what I find.

#79 John DePaula

John DePaula
  • participating member
  • 1,495 posts
  • Location:Portland, OR

Posted 13 February 2007 - 01:59 PM

I have successfully substituted corn syrup and glucose 1:1, but I think you’ll find trimoline or nulomoline has more sweetening power. You might want to experiment a bit to get the right balance. You may also note a difference in mouth feel.

Hope this helps at least a little.
John DePaula
DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#80 gap

gap
  • participating member
  • 499 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 13 February 2007 - 02:07 PM

If you think of normal white sugar from the supermarket as having a "sweetness" of 100% then glucose is roughly 70% sweetness and trimoline is roughly 130% sweetness. Those are the ratios I use when substituting those two ingredients. I'm not sure about the exact sweetness of Nulomoline but it would give you a good place to start.

#81 David J.

David J.
  • participating member
  • 420 posts
  • Location:Michigan

Posted 13 February 2007 - 02:09 PM

I have successfully substituted corn syrup and glucose 1:1 ...



I have a jar from an online supplier that has "Glucose" on the big label and a smaller label with "Corn Syrup" on the back. Would this just be corn syrup with the water taken out? Since it's labeled both ways it's a touch confusing.

I used it the marshmallow recipie which called for corn syrup and now I'm wondering if I should have used a little less due to water being an expected component of normal corn syrup.

#82 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,614 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 13 February 2007 - 03:19 PM

Corn syrup is glucose. The corn syrup you buy in the grocery store has more water and a bit of vanilla flavouring. You can use them pretty much interchangably in candy, you will just have to boil the grocery store corn syrup a bit longer to get the water out and get it up to temperature.

#83 Ceviz

Ceviz
  • participating member
  • 25 posts

Posted 14 February 2007 - 04:10 PM

Hi to everybody,

I'm a newbie in homemade chocolate and trying to learn the basic techniques with the "Making Artisan Chocolates."

I would like to ask an question: In general, I don't want to use corn syrup or invert sugar or ... , any other such things and want to make my ganache only with cream and chocolate. Without corn syrup, how can we modify the recipe "classic dark 72 percent", on page 86. I tried without changing the other parts of the recipe but my ganache was too sticky even after one day setting, so couldn't roll them properly.

Thank you.

#84 K8memphis

K8memphis
  • participating member
  • 2,464 posts
  • Location:memphis tn

Posted 15 February 2007 - 10:09 AM

My kidlette, Teacher-girl, made the Peanut Butter Sizzle, page 102 for her husband for Valentines. They were fabulous! Awesome, just really a sophisticated flavor. He loves peanut butter and chocolate. We thought that the toffee and the cayenne put them over the top.

Posted Image


Posted Image


Posted Image



Making truffles was a first for her and since it was to be a surprise and her goal was to make something sweet for a gift she did use a few shortcuts.

She wound up using two and a half pinches of cayenne and it was just right.

And BonBonMan, something I really appreciate about the book is how easy it is to flop open and use. I really like the soft-ish/hard-ish cover.

I know they were a big hit! Thanks, Drew.

late edit for spelling

Edited by K8memphis, 15 February 2007 - 05:26 PM.


#85 duckduck

duckduck
  • participating member
  • 946 posts
  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 15 February 2007 - 10:52 AM

Hi to everybody,

I'm a newbie in homemade chocolate and trying to learn the basic techniques with the "Making Artisan Chocolates."

I would like to ask an question: In general, I don't want to use corn syrup or invert sugar or ... , any other such things and want to make my ganache only with cream and chocolate. Without corn syrup, how can we modify the recipe "classic dark 72 percent", on page 86. I tried without changing the other parts of the recipe but my ganache was too sticky even after one day setting, so couldn't roll them properly.

Thank you.

View Post

Welcome, Ceviz! Mine were pretty soft when I made the caribbean cocktail truffles so I popped them in the freezer for just a few minutes and rolled them gently after I took them out.
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#86 Ceviz

Ceviz
  • participating member
  • 25 posts

Posted 15 February 2007 - 04:52 PM

Thank you duckduck.

I'm always rolling refrigerated ganache after some cooling in the room temperature and after rolling, one more time, I refrigerate for a very short time before dipping. After taking them out, I'm waiting for cooling for a short period of time and without any problem I'm managing to finish my truffles.

But, in the book, page 83, there are some photos showing how to pipe and roll and the appearance of the ganache in these stages. When rolling, very small parts of the ganache are always sticking to my hands and my ganache is more watery. So, there is no similarity with the photos. I think that there is no emulsion problem, because the appearance is good before rolling.

Today, I tried it with adding more chocolate, but the result was the same but a little bit positive. But, I couln't reach the ganache like in the photo in the rolling period.

I have used %38 cream so far, also will try the same recipe with %35 cream. Maybe, I also have used unsalted butter, I have to decrease the fat ratio for more firm ganache.

Other than fat ratio, I think that maybe the absence of the corn syrup may cause this result, I don't know, I have no experience with these substances before.

This weekend, I'll try it with corn syrup, original recipe, and want to see which effects corn syrup has on the overall texture and appearance.

Edited by Ceviz, 15 February 2007 - 05:06 PM.


#87 ChristopherMichael

ChristopherMichael
  • participating member
  • 132 posts
  • Location:SoCal

Posted 15 February 2007 - 05:46 PM

I just made the 72% truffles and mine came out very firm. The only thing I changed in the recipe is that I used invert instead of corn syrup. I used 72% Guittard. Does anyone know why they came out very firm? FYI, so firm that I couldn't roll them into a ball after they set.

#88 duckduck

duckduck
  • participating member
  • 946 posts
  • Location:portland, oregon

Posted 16 February 2007 - 01:13 PM

ChristopherMichael, on your thread on whipping cream, I had the same question come to mind last night. It's my understanding that different creams have different fat contents and I would think that would have an effect on the ganache. I'm finding differences in buying different brands from one store to the next and some are thicker than others. I've been told that the stuff sold to restaurants does have a higher fat content.
Pamela Wilkinson
www.portlandfood.org
Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

#89 K8memphis

K8memphis
  • participating member
  • 2,464 posts
  • Location:memphis tn

Posted 16 February 2007 - 04:12 PM

Posted Image

View Post


And as luck would have it, yes, they were made with peanut butter from the bad 2111 salmonella scare batch. No one has gotten sick thank goodness. What a rip! All her hard work!! Wow.

#90 ChristopherMichael

ChristopherMichael
  • participating member
  • 132 posts
  • Location:SoCal

Posted 16 February 2007 - 05:19 PM

ChristopherMichael, on your thread on whipping cream, I had the same question come to mind last night. It's my understanding that different creams have different fat contents and I would think that would have an effect on the ganache. I'm finding differences in buying different brands from one store to the next and some are thicker than others. I've been told that the stuff sold to restaurants does have a higher fat content.

View Post


I actually did it with both the manufacturers cream and heavy whipping cream, but same result. It appears that I only get the very firm ganache when I pipe them into balls and try to roll them, but if I put the ganache in a frame I get a softer ganache when set. I don't know why I get different results when I pipe them or frame them. When piped, they seem to set really fast and get hard. When I put the ganache in a frame, it takes over noight to set and it's much softer. Any ideas?





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Confections, Chocolate