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eG Foodblog: racheld - Thanksgiving and Goodwill

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#121 MarketStEl

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 01:09 AM

I've now run the dishwasher twice, packed up the yams, mashed potatoes, stuffing, gravy, mized mustard/collard greens, pumpkin pie and canned cranberry sauce, and wrapped up most of the turkey and put everything in the fridge. I'll tackle taking the meat off the bones and using the bones for stock tomorrow. The last guests have left, everyone but me is asleep, and I can now look back on a fun Thanksgiving and catch up with the action here.

I live for days like this, just like you. Glad to hear Chris was in good enough shape to share in it with you.

Green Eggs and Ham in your cookbook collection! Ever tried them?

As for me, I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#122 racheld

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 06:05 AM

Good Morning After!!! It was a lovely evening, with friends and food and candlelight and lots of laughing. From the first sweep down the stairs of Dear Son bearing an immense pan of Aunt Glynda's-recipe-dressing to go into my big oven, to the last fading taillight through the front screen, it was a beautiful evening.

Chris was right there at the head of the table (albeit the little table, which we had to attach to the big one. The big glass one served just nicely to seat eight last year, but when we bought the lovely new table-bottom at Goodwill several months ago---an excellent buy, beautiful verdigris scrollwork, etc., we did not allow that three cannot fit to a side, by REASON of those gorgeous table legs).

So we went upstairs, unseated a parlor fern the size of a Volkswagen, and brought the little 2 1/2' round table down, snugging it up against the big one. It's a little lower, but we fit just fine.

We started with cranberry/gingerale coolers, so beautiful in their old cut-glass pitcher, and some apple cider. Of course, the kickoff, the starter pistol, the opening of the gate of a Southern Thanksgiving MUST involve some form of Pimiento Cheese.

Stuffed celery with Pimiento Cheese, with cashew butter and benne seeds, and a bowl of Daughter's Famous crab and green onion spread, set atop a battered old travelin' trunk in the sitting area:

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We nibbled and munched whilst the oven finished its business, turning out a lovely golden pan of dressing, divided into two sections: regular recipe in one half, and boiled eggs and celery enrichening the other.

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Note the yellow gravy boat; it contains the giblet gravy, dark and rich with with sauteed, sliced chicken livers---several of our family members just SWEAR by it. Others won't go near it.

The turkey came off the grill after several hours, golden brown and magnificent, a not-too-big specimen, with melty-soft dark meat and smooth, moist slices of white:

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It was just perfect---compliments to the chef all round:

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I must point out three things on our Thanksgiving table, because they were not store-bought:

The tomatoes, which came from our Summer garden, and have been snugged away upstairs in little pockets of newspaper, slumbering til needed.

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The Snap Beans, also grown in our garden---we got three nice pickings off the little rows, and this is two quarts of them, canned in July by my first Mother-In-Law's recipe, which was later appropriated by my own Mother and claimed for her own.

So in effect, the two of my children who were present sat down to a dish long served to them by BOTH of their Grandmothers. The beans start with a few slices of bacon, rendered slowly to give up its fat and shine, then a big chopped onion is added, to fill the kitchen with a home-fragrance reaching back generations.

The two quarts of beans, which had been canned with a little vinegar and a little sugar in the brine, were rinsed in a colander and added, to simmer for perhaps and hour and a half. That's just the way Southern green beans, not just canned ones, are cooked. At the end, whilst Son was checking on the oven, I finger/thumb fished out one bean and gave him a taste.

I always say, "Is that CLOSE?" The big thumbs-up with the huge green oven mitt said I did. And Daughter's eye-closed sigh at her first bite of beans from her plate said the same. Home and memory and food from other hands, remembered for the times and the circumstances and the sheer FEEL of the other woman's kitchen and table.

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And the CORN. It started life in an Indiana cornfield, bristling from those waving green stalks, and was transported to our back yard one day in July. Son and I stood at the tailgate, shucking the rustly green ears, and as we "got some ahead," I sat down to silk as he finished crackling the shucks from the fourteen dozen ears. He came in to wash and cut, first nipping the tips off the kernels with a sharp little knife, then reversing the blade to scrape every drop of the milk from the corn.

We blanched the batch, watching it go from a yellow-studded liquid in the pan, to a bubbling, thickening mass, with little "puh" sounds punctuating its cooking changes. Into the freezer in pressed-flat neat little bags, and three of the bags went into the skillet yesterday. My Mother always had a skillet of oven corn on her Thanksgiving table. She would take three of the little freezer boxes out, plok them upside down into the skillet, drop in a stick of butter, pour in about an inch of hot water, and shower salt over the whole thing, then plop it into the oven.

As it heated, she would screech out the oven rack and reach in with a long spoon, scraping off the thawed, withering tops into the liquid, stirring, but only until all was thawed and mixed. THEN, the corn was left to do its own magic, developing a little bottom crust of a flavor and texture beyond any human-created foodstuffs. The center was creamy, the top getting firm and golden, and the corn was ready to pull out and serve to kings.

So that's what we had last night, from field to table, through our own hands:

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I'd proudly set that old black skillet on any table, beside the Sheffield and Limoge.

I'm going to post this much now, as I did a great long one the other day, and lost the whole thing into the air. Besides, we're all together, Chris and Daughter and I, and it's time for breakfast.

moire non

Edited by racheld, 24 November 2006 - 08:50 AM.

Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#123 racheld

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:22 AM

More on the feast:

Of course, no Thanksgiving, barn raising, baptising or Hog Roast would be complete without devilled eggs:

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Daughter requested a steamed broccoli/caulifower combination, simply dressed with lemon and salt. This, oddly enough, almost exactly matches one of only three pictures I managed to post LAST Thanksgiving.

It tasted fresh and lemony and was a good contrast to all the richness elsewhere on the table.

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It was also probably the only dish without butter, except for the cranberry:

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Daughter-in-law brought this from her Mom's house; they had eaten a lunchtime dinner with her parents, and she sent leftovers: the cranberry salad and the remains of a "Mountain Mama," with all its layers of cream cheese, pudding, and a Pecan Sandy crust.

We also had a cooked cranberry sauce with little supremed orange segments, as well as the obligatory can of Ocean Spray.

DDIL also brought her broccoli/cauliflower salad, made with raisins, bacon and cheddar. It's an expected regular on the tables of BOTH sides of the family, now.
There's always a discussion of who just HATES broccoli, but they tried this and ate the whole bowl.

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Chris always requests Aunt Barbara's Five-Cup salad, made with impossible amounts of Cool-Whip and sour cream, along with crushed pineapple, halved red grapes, and enough marshmallows to float the Bismarck.

Nobody ate it but him, I think. Consider it medicine.

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The table was crammed. I was snapping photos, people were emerging from the kitchen with hotpads full of dishes, asking, "You want this HERE?" and "Shall I put the spoons IN the bowls?" Lotsa help, lotsa chaos, and we got the pictures, said the blessing, served our plates and sat down. We serve so many company meals buffet style, and the rule is, if we've said the blessing, you eat when you sit down. Somebody will be right there to keep you company, and the food doesn't get cold waiting decorously for everyone to meander through the line.


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Some of everything on the plate at Thanksgiving always makes me think of Marge in Fargo when she and her husband are going through the buffet line at the BIG LUNCH. They just talk and glop and sling great ladles of stuff onto unseen plates down below camera level. This, for the first time for the viewing public, is what they REALLY looked like:

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From twelve o'clock: Broccoli/cauliflower; dressing; tomato; wild rice salad;
green beans; stuffed egg; corn; broccoli salad; turkey. Center: baked sweet potato slices with vanilla butter and marshmallows.

Daughter (newly registered eGullet member caroled) says I need to apologize to torakris and all her compadres on the No Touching thread. And I DO apologize. For this plate, I grovel, I cringe.

Moire non.

Edited by racheld, 24 November 2006 - 08:32 AM.

Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#124 racheld

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:47 AM

The table, afternoon, whilst the sun shines and the aromas of bacon and onion frying and gravy simmering fill the house. The little table sat a bit lower than the other, but it was fun; Chris and I sat there together.

We call these glasses the "Mammaw goblets" because she had about a dozen of them, clunky old heavy things, with feelable grapes etched into the sides with what feels like emery under your fingertips. She had them on her table at every occasion---they were probably the only glasses she had that didn't say "Welch's."
(Or Garrett---Mammaw had a sister who dipped).

These were also the tea receptacles involved with the Bottomless Teapot of my childhood, the one that she poured and poured from, never seeming to run out of the strong Lipton brew.

We use them for all important occasions; I have found several more in flea markets over the years, but still recognize the originals---the grapes are larger, but smoothed by countless hands, and the gold rim is just a whisper on the lip.

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This is not on the buffet because it was the Forgotten Thing. Never a holiday or Sunday meal is spent without missing an item---a congealed salad made the day before to chill, then pushed WAY back into the refrigerator and missed when the table is set. A bowl of potato salad, to accompany the cookout hamburgers, left at home/in the house and not thought of until breakfast, when you have to move it to get at the bacon.

It's happened to us all, especially when the menu is not just the usual meat, two vegetables, and salad. All the little Tupperwares and Glad Boxes, filled for easy fitting into a crowded fridge, then the contents forsworn and neglected, but nice for a quick lunch next day---those cause a start of dismay, then an easy laugh because of the inconsequence of the loss.

I'm just surprised that a hue and cry did not emanate from Chris' end of the table; he LIKES his Ocean Spray, and that would have clued me in to go get BOTH the compotes from the fridge. As it was, I went for the dish of cut lemon and spied this, halfway through the meal. I just set both bowls on the table to be passed.

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There was a gorgeous cheese plate, but I didn't get all the names from Carole, so I'll detail it later---some blues, a Brie and a good hearty, crumbly cheddar are all I remember. Grapes, apple slices, and good old meaty Mississippi pecans toasted by Chris' special recipe to accompany.

And there was dessert. I had made a Key Lime pudding---the old Eagle Brand lemon pie recipe, but with those pesky little Barbie-limes that yield half a teaspoon apiece. Chris' request, and he brought in the limes. Carole made an ambrosia cake, involving using crushed orange segments for part of the liquid in the batter; it makes a rich, moist layer. It was a single layer, frosted with Cream Cheese Frosting, then patted thickly with a long-shred sweet coconut we hadn't tried before.

She also did a WW recipe for a three-berry crumble with oatmeal streusel topping, which was yummmmmy.

The candy-stand held the making of fudge, along with some Lindt truffles and some tiny pocky-like things with no handle, chocolate over espresso centers.

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DDIL came in with the three-layered chocolate cream cheese Cool-Whip dessert left from her Mom's dinner, and our other guests brought TWO of the creamy cheesecakes-in-a-piecrust topped with wonderful sour cherries in sauce.

The dessert service was also chaos, with everyone hopping up to get and serve their own offerings, so the plates look a little chaotic. I was reaching WAY over the table to make sure everyone got a slice of cake---some slices toppled onto the plates like Jengas, and the creamy cakes got sort of jiggled onto the plate. The only sedate item seemed to be the sherbet dishes of the lemon pudding, with their little whipped-cream topknots and tiny slice of lime.

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I left the cream off the berry crumble---it WAS WW, after all, and there was quite enough schlag on the plate already.

And one last item, a treat-beyond-marvel, a delicious combination of supremed orange and tangerine segments, as the final palate-memory of a good meal. This was a coveted dish, a put-forward-to-company dish, from the days when oranges were dear and scarce, the finest gem in a Christmas stocking's toe.

My still-limited camera skills cannot do justice to the colors, the orange and the pale gold, of the fruit; the little dish of cool fruit was a fitting finale to the heavy, rich, traditional Southern Thanksgiving meal.

Ambrosia:

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The port went wanting, and I STILL can't look at that bottle of Bailey's in the fridge.
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#125 zoe b

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:48 AM

well, Rachel now that our Thanksgiving is over I can allow myself the pleasure of reading about yours--I'll be back tonight to read every page--it will be a midnight treat!

Zoe

#126 racheld

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 10:49 AM

Thank you all for reading so far. It's been just a delight to be able to share our home and our Holiday with you.

I've mentioned earlier that we'll be traveling in a couple of hours to visit with our children and Grandchildren, who are now a couple of hours South of here, at their other Grandparents' house. I'll be leaving you until late tonight, but I want to leave you with a little gift that's been a long time in the making, and still has a way to go.

The STORY:

Several years ago, our daughter and Granddaughter came to live with us, and stayed a year and a half. Gracie was just two-and-a-half when they came to us, and was with me every day, in and out of the kitchen, the garden, out and about for groceries and museums and parks. We formed a wonderful bond, and are still marvelously close to this day, despite the distance between us. She has her Mom and a wonderful new Stepfather, as well as a dainty/sturdy little sister, who is now the age that Gracie was then.

That Christmas that they lived here, Gracie and her mother gave me a tiny teaset, a doll-sized little affair, with wee cups and saucers, and all the needfuls for doll-tea.

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That next Summer, after they had moved away, they were back for a visit. We were sitting around the table after a good supper together, when Chris said, "Why don't we all go Maggie Moo's for ice cream? My Treat!!" I said I'd just stay and do up the dishes, and Gracie said, "I'd rather stay with you."

What a lovely compliment!!! And as we cleared the kitchen, she pointed to the little shelf with the teaset. "I want to wash THAT," she said. And so we got her little step-stool; I put a small plastic pan into the sink to avoid mishaps, filled it with warm soapy water, and she washed. I dried, and then she wanted to have tea. So we sat down; she poured; we sipped.

Then she looked up, reached, caught, and put something into the teapot. She kept at this until she heard no more, and said, "Now they're safe, the Fairies."

We continued our tea, Family returned, and so to bed. I sat down here and dashed off a little story for her, and then months later, I decided to make it into a little booklet for her Christmas present. I found some enchanting fairies online, and wrote to ask the artist if I might use some for a one-of-a-kind little booklet.

She asked to read the poem, and wrote back that she'd like to do some watercolors for it. So she did, and is still sending sketches of the ongoing group of paintings.

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Some of them have been in "faerie books" published in England, including one of her own, and the latest Linda Ravenscroft features the teapot as its backcover art.

So, for all of you who have children, please accept this and read it to them; for all of you who just enjoy a little story, please enjoy, and for all of my eGullet friends, thank you from my heart for being so kind and supportive of my little scribblings.

rachel


FAIRY TEA


One nice summer day in August, everyone was out and gone;
Save for Gracie and her Ganjin, who had stayed at home alone.

They were sitting at the table, both enjoying Fairy Tea,
After washing up the teaset, gently, oh so carefully.

In the pan of soft warm water, they so gently washed each cup
Gracie did the careful washing; Ganjin did the drying up.

Tiny muffins, crumpets, teacakes, set upon on the table there
All beside the steaming teapot---Oh, what tasty fairy fare!!

Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out,
And the flavor you imagine will come streaming from the spout.

So each person at the table conjures up her favorite kind--
Lemon, thimbleberry, moonbeam, what the drinker has in mind.

And you never spill it on you, even if you drop your cup,
Its enchantment keeps it safely; you just reach and pick it up.

And the pot stays warm forever, until washed and put away.
It will last the longest teatime, for an hour or a day.

So they sat there sipping, pouring, tasting different kinds of tea;
When they heard a noise above them, a soft humming like a bee.

And then Gracie looked up, listening, hearing hums of fairy flight;
Then she reached up, caught one gently, put it safely out of sight.

In the sugarbowl it rested, lying softly in the sweet
As she reached for several others, placed them gently on their feet

On the cakeplate, where they sampled tender crumbs of cake and pie,
While she kept on catching fairies, as they kept on floating by.

Some she put in cups and saucers, and a few she hid away
In the creamer, where they frolicked, swimming, giggling in their play.

In the teapot went a dozen, with the cover, softly laid,
And they yawned and stretched and nestled, as the light began to fade.

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Gracie made the fairies welcome, with a place to spend the night,
With a lot of downy pillows, cushions, blankets softest white,

Then she laid some bits of napkin all across the cups and bowls,
So they’d all be safe and comfy, air-conditioned by the holes.

Gracie worked her childhood’s magic, as the night grew soft and deep,
And she leaned down close and whispered: “You’ll be safe here; go to sleep.”

But somewhere a Fairy Poacher tracked their whereabouts to there,
And he took a Bumbletaxi, coming buzzing through the air.

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For it’s a fact, and we all know, that Poachers cannot fly,
And could not catch a fairy, when they’re soaring through the sky.

So he had to catch them sleeping, but he could not find their nest.
They surround themselves with magic, when they lay them down to rest.

He’d been sent to find some fairies, for a circus far away,
He meant to catch some, and be gone, before the break of day.

But he’d been a long time traveling, and was hungry from his flight,
So he sat down on the table, and ate everything in sight.

Crumpets, muffins, little cupcakes, all the sandwiches cut small;
Jam and cream and scones and teacakes—he sat there and ate it all.

Then he reached for that small teapot, tried to pour himself a cup;
But he couldn’t make the tea pour; magic had the spout stopped up.

So he peeked down through the spouthole, and he saw them lying there,
And he squeezed into the teaspout, so’s to catch them unaware.

But those crumpets, scones, and teacakes made his tiny self too wide
And he woke them with his shouting, as he tried to squeeze inside.

He was stuck, and could not move, and thus was trapped inside the spout.
He was dangling, just above them, though his feet were hanging out.

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And his little face grew redder, from his being stuck so tight;
So the fairies all took pity, and they freed him from his plight.

Then the Poacher was SO sorry, and he swore to mend his ways;
Now he’s poaching eggs at Denny’s, and he’s cooking Hollandaise.

As for Gracie and her Ganjin, they still hostess Fairy Tea,
People come, and sit, and visit, but the only ones who SEE

Are those who believe in magic, and that dreams, indeed, come true.
You’re invited ANY teatime. And we all BELIEVE----Do YOU?

I hope so.

rachel

Edited by racheld, 24 November 2006 - 09:58 PM.

Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#127 Swisskaese

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 11:36 AM

That is beautiful Rachel and the watercolors are also very beautiful. What a wonderful Grandmother you are. I always treasured when my Great-Aunt Erna, may she rest in peace, came to visit and fill my head with stories of two mischievous children named Pumpernickle and Pimpernel. We begged her to publish her stories, but she never did. You brought back wonderful memories of her telling me those stories and speaking to me in French during my summer vacations.

#128 ghostrider

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 11:36 AM

Always loved your various signature lines from Fairy Tea. Nice to see the whole thing in one place.

Hope your Hall pots are well & whole.

Thanks for this wonderful blog.
Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

#129 srhcb

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 11:43 AM

As for Gracie and her Ganjin, they still hostess Fairy Tea,
People come, and sit, and visit, but the only ones who SEE

Are those who believe in magic, and that dreams, indeed, come true.
You’re invited ANY teatime.    And we all BELIEVE----Do YOU?

I hope so.

rachel

View Post


Steve and Zach will be there.

"Magic is Afoot" - Leonard Cohen

SB (likes the Buffy St Marie version best :cool: )

#130 Carrot Top

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 12:17 PM

You know I've had the good fortune to have read in full that poem of yours before, Rachel.

Yet each time my eyes (and my heart) take it in, I am astonished anew at the power it holds.

  And we all BELIEVE----Do YOU?

View Post


Yes, I do, ma'am.

(Though I must admit to a terrible impulse rising within me to poke that Poacher quite sharply in his behind several times with a sharp sewing pin before he's allowed free from the pot. :smile: )

Thank you for sharing your magic with us this week.

#131 Ann_T

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 12:32 PM

Oh Rachel, to think I almost missed your Blog. What a tragedy that would have been.

I've enjoyed my morning spent with you getting caught up. You have a way with words that paint a picture and now that you are posting photos , well that is just a bonus.

The shared grandmother stories are so special. No one was more important to me than my beloved grandmother. We, my parents and my older brother lived in my grandparents home for the first 5 years of my life and when I was two months old my mom was in the hospital for a couple of months. So it was my grandmother that I bonded with. My great grandmother also lived with us. When I was 5 we moved to the house next door so my grandparents continued to be a daily part of my life. I spent more time there then I did my own home. I know that I got my love of food from my grandmother. She has been gone now for 23 years and I still have moments when I feel the need to talk to her .


Your poem and the story behind it brought me to tears. The relationship you share with Gracie is something very special.

I wish your blog could go on indefinitely.


Ann

#132 MarketStEl

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 01:06 PM

Thank you all for reading so far.  It's been just a delight to be able to share our home and our Holiday with you.


The pleasure, dear Rachel, is ours entirely.


As for Gracie and her Ganjin, they still hostess Fairy Tea,
People come, and sit, and visit, but the only ones who SEE

Are those who believe in magic, and that dreams, indeed, come true.
You’re invited ANY teatime.    And we all BELIEVE----Do YOU?

View Post


Oh, I do now. How could I not help but be convinced by this charming tale and lovely poem? And the illustrations are just as beautiful.

I assume this has been published? If it hasn't, what are you waiting for?
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#133 judiu

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 02:04 PM

Rachel, thank you SO much for sharing your wonderful holiday, brilliant poetry and magnificent illustations. You've turned what promised to be a rotten day into a lovely one! :wub:
"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

#134 SuzySushi

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 02:17 PM

What a wonderful story!!! You really should publish it -- it could become a classic.
SuzySushi

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My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

#135 Pan

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 03:25 PM

Rachel,

Your Thanksgiving feast looked amazing, and that fairy story is so cute!

#136 eje

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 04:47 PM

rachel,

What a beautiful blog and spectacular Thanksgiving Dinner. It made me feel as if I was back at my Aunt's in the Midwest for Christmas.

Thanks so much!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#137 Smithy

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 04:55 PM

That's a WONDERFUL story, and the pictures to go with it are PERFECT. How fortunate: for you, that the fairies were willing to pose for the artist; for Gracie, that's you're so insightful and clever; for us, that you're so willing to share.

You've added yet another blessing to this holiday season. May the blessings return manifold to you.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#138 Abra

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 05:42 PM

It's so nice to finally have time to sit with your blog, so cozy and homey and old-fashioned in the best possible. Thank you for sharing your week with us, Rachel!

#139 Cadbury

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:15 PM

What a fantastic poem, Rachel, and a most enjoyable blog. My little Rachel is sitting here wondering why her Mummy has tears rolling down her cheeks. I'm sure she'll enjoy the poem, I just don't think I could read it out loud yet without becoming a jibbering mess.

#140 Marlene

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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:38 PM

Racheld, that was a most lovely poem. Tonight, as my son prepared to bid his final goodbyes to his grandmother, I read it to him. At the almost ancient age of 14, when he's too "cool" to be emotional, he asked to print it out to lay with her when she "takes wings".

Our Thanksgiving is long past, but yours has reminded me again how thankful we should all be at all times for good food, good friends, and close family.

Thank you.
Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

#141 racheld

racheld
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Posted 24 November 2006 - 08:59 PM

I assume this has been published?  If it hasn't, what are you waiting for?

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It takes a LONG time to paint all the pictures for a verse-by-verse book, and she's quite in demand by firms that actually PAY her the fees that her work commands. I just started out needing a few little things to print out and stick in a booklet, and it's just such fun to see the pictures in and on books, and little snippets of the verse inside, with credit to Gracie and me.

But it's very nice that you think it should be.

We'll save you the moustache cup.
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#142 racheld

racheld
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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:02 PM

Marlene,

That was more touching and more valuable to me than all the publication in the world. What a sweet thing to do!! I've known from your posts that you have a very special young man there.

Thank you for telling me.

rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#143 racheld

racheld
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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:06 PM

That is beautiful Rachel and the watercolors are also very beautiful. What a wonderful Grandmother you are.

Thank you so much---I can take no credit for the pictures; I picked her off the internet, and she just ran with the idea. The Grandmother part is one of my favorite and proudest accomplishments. I'm glad it provided you with a good memory to savor.

rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#144 racheld

racheld
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  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:08 PM

Always loved your various signature lines from Fairy Tea.  Nice to see the whole thing in one place.

Hope your Hall pots are well & whole.

Thanks for this wonderful blog.

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Thank you so much, fellow pot-collector!! I appreciate your kindness, and the Halls, McCormicks, et al, are all well, but perhaps dusty during this hectic time.

I'm glad you are enjoying this; I certainly am, and wish I had had more time to do it justice.

rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#145 racheld

racheld
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  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:10 PM

Steve and Zach will be there.


Ahhh!!! We'll be delighted. Five lumps or six?
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#146 racheld

racheld
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  • 2,677 posts
  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:11 PM

You know I've had the good fortune to have read in full that poem of yours before, Rachel.

Thank you for sharing your magic with us this week.

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You're quite welcome, and have been tossing around a little magic, yourself. Always glad to hear from you, and thank YOU.

rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#147 racheld

racheld
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  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:18 PM

Oh Rachel, to think I almost missed your Blog.  What a tragedy that would have been.

Your poem and the story behind it brought me to tears. The relationship you share with Gracie is something very special.

I wish your blog could go on indefinitely.
Ann

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Well, I'm glad you found it---always good to hear from you. I'm glad you enjoyed today's little surprise, and I appreciate your kind words. I, too, wish I had more time to do justice to what I meant to do, but I'll give it my best in the next two days.

Thank you,


rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#148 racheld

racheld
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Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:19 PM

Rachel, thank you SO much for sharing your wonderful holiday, brilliant poetry and magnificent illustations. You've turned what promised to be a rotten day into a lovely one!  :wub:

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I'm SO glad. Wow.

Thank you so much, and I hope tomorrow is wonderful.

rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#149 racheld

racheld
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  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:21 PM

What a wonderful story!!! You really should publish it -- it could become a classic.

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My goodness!! What a lovely thing to say!! I wish we could, but it takes time and depends on lots of things. But the artist is amazing, isn't she?

Thank you so much,


rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA

#150 racheld

racheld
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  • 2,677 posts
  • Location:Tawandaland

Posted 24 November 2006 - 09:22 PM

Rachel,

Your Thanksgiving feast looked amazing, and that fairy story is so cute!

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I thank you, sir, and wish I could be in some of your concert halls this holiday season.

rachel
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
Fairy Tea

My Blog--Thanksgiving and Goodwill

LAWN TEA





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