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Red wine jelly

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11 replies to this topic

#1 Desiderio

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 03:29 AM

So my sis brought me some samples from l'artisan du chocolate, the liquid center sea salt caramel and a box of their pralines.I had a taste of some and I found them very balanced ,clean, maybe little bit on the sweet side ,but I really liked them ,then I tried the red wine jelly one and I thought i wouldnt like it, but I was wrong .It was very good,very balance again , no flavor to overpower the other ,a nice balanced chocolate.Now I never made jellyies , so I was courious to know how to make those nice very armonious jellies to combine with ganahces in pralines.Any recipie or suggestions ?


Thank you so much .
Vanessa

#2 escry

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 04:54 AM

Hi Vanessa

I know both these pralines well, indeed I have some of L'artisan's sea salt caramels to hand, so I thought I would eat one whilst replying to your post. Mmmm ...

I agree Gerald Coleman's red wine jelly is rather good. The jelly is between 60 and 70 Brix, ie 30-40 parts water to 60-70 parts solids (sugars and jelling agent).

The jelly's harmony comes partly from the balanced sweetness: it just does not taste as sweet as a 70% brix pate de fruit! I guess that he may use a significant proportion of maltodextrin and glucose (eg a low DE glucose syrup).

Usually, a pate de fruit uses a high ester pectin which requires solids above 67% (and a low pH) to set. Alternatively a low ester pectin sets below 67% solids (and likes calcium to set firmly). Does Gereld use HE pectin at its lowest limit or LE pectin at its highest? I don't know ... I use LE pectin, and give directions for this:

Ingredients

800g red wine
200g invert sugar (mix together)

600g water (of which 250g will be lost to evaporation)

100g sucrose
30g pectin (mix together)

1000g sucrose
200g glucose (mix together)

Directions

Heat water and sucrose/glucose to 80 degrees Celsius in a bowl over rapidly boiling water. Slowly add sucrose/pectin, stirring hard to avoid lumps. Keep heating (evaporation) until syprup reaches 80 Brix. Take off heat.

Let syrup cool to about 40 degrees Celsius (it will not set as the Brix is too high). Meanwhile warm red wine/invert sugar to 40 degrees Celsius.

Combine red wine/invert sugar and syrup. Pour into frame onto greaseproof paper. Leave for 24 hours. Cut with guitar.

Heating the final ingredients to 40 degrees Celsius allows them to be combined and poured before they set up, which they will do quite quickly.

The final brix of these pates de fruit will be 57%. If these are enrobed in chocolate, as L'artisan's are, then they will be shelf-safe for 2 to 3 weeks at 17 degrees Celsius, or 4 to 5 weeks at 12 degress.

#3 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 04:59 AM

Hi Vanessa

I know both these pralines well, indeed I have some of L'artisan's sea salt caramels to hand, so I thought I would eat one whilst replying to your post. Mmmm ...

I agree Gerald Coleman's red wine jelly is rather good. The jelly is between 60 and 70 Brix, ie 30-40 parts water to 60-70 parts solids (sugars and jelling agent).

The jelly's harmony comes partly from the balanced sweetness: it just does not taste as sweet as a 70% brix pate de fruit! I guess that he may use a significant proportion of maltodextrin and glucose (eg a low DE glucose syrup).

Usually, a pate de fruit uses a high ester pectin which requires solids above 67% (and a low pH) to set. Alternatively a low ester pectin sets below 67% solids (and likes calcium to set firmly). Does Gereld use HE pectin at its lowest limit or LE pectin at its highest? I don't know ... I use LE pectin, and give directions for this:

I have apple pectin, liquid citrus pectin and pectin NH. Does low ester pectin fit anywhere in those or would I need to find yet another pectin?

#4 Desiderio

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 05:22 AM

Wow wow wow, Escry , thank you soo much for taking the time and post the formula,I am very new to jelly in these form so I will have to start working on it as sson as I get back home, I am wondering if I can btain sucrose online ( I guess so ).
Thank you so much again for you help :biggrin:
Vanessa

#5 Kerry Beal

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 05:29 AM

Wow wow wow, Escry , thank you soo much for taking the time and post the formula,I am very new to jelly in these form so I will have to start working on it as sson as I get back home, I am wondering if I can btain sucrose online ( I guess so ).
Thank you so much again for you help  :biggrin:

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Vanessa sucrose = table sugar so the search will be easy once home. The pectin might be more of a challenge unless low ester pectin is that stuff for freezer jam.

#6 escry

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 07:28 AM

You can use a high ester (high methoxyl) pectin just as well, but will have to make a one simple adjustment. Noting that the final Brix (solids content) must be higher than 67% for a HE pectin, you will need less water. No need to adjust pH as wine is acidic.

Adjustedment for HE pectin

Instead of mixing the invert sugar with 600g water and heating to 80 degrees Celsius, heat the 800g of red wine mixed with the invert sugar to 80 degrees Celsius (and water a plant with the 600g of water, you no longer need this).

Add the pectin/sucrose mixture as before. Evaporate similarly to about 75 Brix. Pour into frame ...

Disadvantage of this process is that you heat the wine, and it is somewhat sweeter.

#7 sote23

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 02:48 PM

Wow wow wow, Escry , thank you soo much for taking the time and post the formula,I am very new to jelly in these form so I will have to start working on it as sson as I get back home, I am wondering if I can btain sucrose online ( I guess so ).
Thank you so much again for you help  :biggrin:

View Post

Vanessa sucrose = table sugar so the search will be easy once home. The pectin might be more of a challenge unless low ester pectin is that stuff for freezer jam.

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let us know how it turns out for you. by the way, have a yummy gelato for me while your there.

#8 aguynamedrobert

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 04:50 PM

For making Jellies you can also use a temperture procedure just in case you don't have an instrument to show the brix level. So if you don't have a "refractometer" to show the brix level then you can use the temperature method as well...let me know if you would like that procedure and I'll send it your way...it is a good skill to have, that is using the refractometer but if you don't have one right now then you can do it by temperature as well and when you are good you can even do it by sight....

tell us how they turn out,
Robert
www.chocolateguild.com

#9 Desiderio

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 11:23 AM

For making Jellies you can also use a temperture procedure just in case you don't have an instrument to show the brix level. So if you don't have a "refractometer" to show the brix level then you can use the temperature method as well...let me know if you would like that procedure and I'll send it your way...it is a good skill to have, that is using the refractometer but if you don't have one right now then you can do it by temperature as well and when you are good you can even do it by sight....

tell us how they turn out,
Robert
www.chocolateguild.com

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Thank you Robert , in fact i dont have a refractometer , and I was thinking to either get one or find a table with conversion number for brix and C, wich I am not sure I have.I would love to have the temperature method ,meaning know what temperature is a certain brix level.Talking about that is anyone familiar with Minifie book? I know is very technical and the trouble is the very hgh price for the book , but I know has many many interesting things I think I would like to know and read.

Thank you much for your help :smile:
Vanessa

#10 Kerry Beal

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 11:26 AM

For making Jellies you can also use a temperture procedure just in case you don't have an instrument to show the brix level. So if you don't have a "refractometer" to show the brix level then you can use the temperature method as well...let me know if you would like that procedure and I'll send it your way...it is a good skill to have, that is using the refractometer but if you don't have one right now then you can do it by temperature as well and when you are good you can even do it by sight....

tell us how they turn out,
Robert
www.chocolateguild.com

View Post


Thank you Robert , in fact i dont have a refractometer , and I was thinking to either get one or find a table with conversion number for brix and C, wich I am not sure I have.I would love to have the temperature method ,meaning know what temperature is a certain brix level.Talking about that is anyone familiar with Minifie book? I know is very technical and the trouble is the very hgh price for the book , but I know has many many interesting things I think I would like to know and read.

Thank you much for your help :smile:

View Post

Minife is great for the theory. But see if you can find a cheaper copy on abebooks.com

#11 Desiderio

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 05:44 AM

Ahh Kerry , I think I have confused the word sucrose with dextrose :blink: , oh well , not too bright though! :laugh:
Thank you for the link, I have found a very low prize but I guess is gone :sad: , I ll keep looking , I am wondering how much is a good price for it.
Vanessa

#12 Desiderio

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 07:19 AM

Ok , I am back from my trip , unfortunally ,so I am ready to get buisy , so I dont have to think that I am not in Italy anymore :sad:
Talking about pectine, I found two type in my kitchen, one is the Pomona's one ,the other is the "sure jell brand, now since i dont know much about pectin ( about time to buy the Minifie uhhh),wich one I need to use , or do I need to find another type of pectine, perhaps the one they sell in natural stores in little bags?
Thank you.
Vanessa





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