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Spanish restaurants in the US

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3 replies to this topic

#1 FoodMan

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 09:26 AM

Chef-
In the US we have relatively few authentic Spanish restaurants as opposed to say Italian restaurants or French ones. It is true that Spain and it's food (besides tapas) is gaining popularity and I am very happy about that becuase it is a remarkable cuisine, but still in a city as big as Houston, you will find maybe one or two Spanish restaurants, and even those they mainly emphasize tapas.

In her book, The New Spanish Table, Anya Von Bremzen attributes that to the extreme regionality and ingredient specific dishes that can be only found in Spain. Meaning that many Spanish dishes cannot be made properly outside of their hometown.

Do you agree? If not what is your take on the subject?

I'll reserve my opinion of her statement till you post yours :smile:


Many thanks for taking the time to join us Chef!

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com


#2 Jose Andres

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 02:57 PM

Chef-
In the US we have relatively few authentic Spanish restaurants as opposed to say Italian restaurants or French ones. It is true that Spain and it's food (besides tapas) is gaining popularity and I am very happy about that becuase it is a remarkable cuisine, but still in a city as big as Houston, you will find maybe one or two Spanish restaurants, and even those they mainly emphasize tapas.

In her book, The New Spanish Table, Anya Von Bremzen attributes that to the extreme regionality and ingredient specific dishes that can be only found in Spain. Meaning that many Spanish dishes cannot be made properly outside of their hometown.

Do you agree? If not what is your take on the subject?

I'll reserve my opinion of her statement till you post yours  :smile:


Many thanks for taking the time to join us Chef!

View Post

I will have to disagree with my good friend Anya......................Spanish restaurant in Amercia or the lack of them is because is not Spanish chefs here..............................Another thing is about the ingredients........What happen we can not make a Gazpacho with tomatoes from Good Morning FArm in PEnn?

Yes, we only need good Spanish Sherry vinegar and good Spanish olive oil!...But if we take out vinegar and oil from spain and we used from lets say California, Is not Spanish anymore?...............I will argue that the dish is still Spanish at heart...................

#3 docsconz

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 03:24 PM

Chef-
In the US we have relatively few authentic Spanish restaurants as opposed to say Italian restaurants or French ones. It is true that Spain and it's food (besides tapas) is gaining popularity and I am very happy about that becuase it is a remarkable cuisine, but still in a city as big as Houston, you will find maybe one or two Spanish restaurants, and even those they mainly emphasize tapas.

In her book, The New Spanish Table, Anya Von Bremzen attributes that to the extreme regionality and ingredient specific dishes that can be only found in Spain. Meaning that many Spanish dishes cannot be made properly outside of their hometown.

Do you agree? If not what is your take on the subject?

I'll reserve my opinion of her statement till you post yours  :smile:


Many thanks for taking the time to join us Chef!

View Post

I will have to disagree with my good friend Anya......................Spanish restaurant in Amercia or the lack of them is because is not Spanish chefs here..............................Another thing is about the ingredients........What happen we can not make a Gazpacho with tomatoes from Good Morning FArm in PEnn?

Yes, we only need good Spanish Sherry vinegar and good Spanish olive oil!...But if we take out vinegar and oil from spain and we used from lets say California, Is not Spanish anymore?...............I will argue that the dish is still Spanish at heart...................

View Post


Jose, while I agree with you that even though certain dishes might not be quite the same as they are in their Spanish hometowns, they still remain Spanish at heart assuming good quality ingredients can be substituted. The dish will most likely remain delicious even if it is slightly or somewaht different. Despite that general sense, are there any Spanish ingredients that you absolutely miss using professionally that you simply can not obtain in the U.S. other than by bringing them back yourself? I am talking about ingredients readily available at least on a regional basis.
John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."
- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

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#4 FoodMan

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 07:37 AM

Exactly, I agree with you as well Chef. I think Italian food is also very regional as Chef Batali likes to remind us often, but restaurants serving it (good or bad versions) are everywhere ion the US. However, my thought is we have much more Italian than Spanish due to the existense of a much bigger immigrant population from Italy in the early 20th century compared to Spanish.

This in turn supports your reasoning that we simply do not have as much Spanish chefs as we do others.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com






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