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How to clean All-Clad Pans - All Types


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#1 NoEggs

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 11:13 AM

I think I had the heat too hot and now there is a haze in my saute pan. The All-Clad site recommends a product called Bar Keeper’s Friend. Anybody use this or could tell me another method?

#2 Marlene

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 11:15 AM

I use bar keeper's friend all the time on my All Clad pots and pans. Works like a charm.
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#3 John S.

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:01 PM

I think I had the heat too hot and now there is a haze in my saute pan. The All-Clad site recommends a product called Bar Keeper’s Friend. Anybody use this or could tell me another method?

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BKF has oxalic acid as its mechanism and is not abrasive, so it won't scratch. I saved an All-Clad saucepan using BKF. It was almost black in some places purple in most others due to not putting water in it prior to using under a double boiler. I wondered why the chocolate wasn't melting and that's why. Almost threw it away but now is one of my favorite pans. I would not want to try anything else since I like BKF so much.

#4 scubadoo97

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:21 PM

being relatively new to polished stainless steel pans, I have used an array of different methods. BKF is the ticket for most things. Often a soiled pan can be soaked over night in hot water. The next day most food stuff will come right off. Dawn Power Dis solver work wonders on some more baked on stuff. I typically use BKF as the finishing method. If you get a haze from hard water, a little vinegar will remove it and bring the pan back to a high luster.

#5 Bella S.F.

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 05:19 PM

Someone recommended a product called Cameo. It may only be available on the East Coast. My in-laws sent some out to us. It works great on the inside of the pans, makes them look like new. We don't use it on the outside of the pans.
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#6 tim

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 05:31 PM

HI,

Cameo works very will on Stainless and Aluminum. It is more expensive than the BKF but works much better on the exterior of Masterchef pans.

Tim

#7 bleachboy

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 05:45 PM

Bar Keeper's Friend is awesome stuff. I am pretty sure my official Falk Culinair (copper pan) literature even recommends it. I've never had it do any harm, I've never had it fail to make a pot or pan look like new.

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#8 Lordof7

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 07:19 AM

What is this haze that forms on stainless pans? After breaking in my Sitram Catering sauce pan with a mustard cream sauce, I had a haze right over the copper disc, even though I had used lowish heat. I wasn't worried at all about it, but after making a vinegar mop, the haze disappeared, presumably into the mop, which I had happily used on my first smoked pork butt. I didn't notice the haze had disappeared until I washed the pan.

Yeah, so a warm apple cider vinegar wash works well to remove that!

#9 silentbob

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Posted 26 December 2006 - 01:13 PM

Does anyone know if there is a significant difference in effectiveness between the powder and liquid forms of BKF?

#10 Marlene

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Posted 26 December 2006 - 01:50 PM

I have both the powder and the liquid. The powder seems to clean better, but I couldn't tell you why!
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#11 pounce

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Posted 26 December 2006 - 03:15 PM

The powder has an abrasive where I don't think the liquid does. I don't use the powder on the outside of my All Clad because I think it will dull the polish.
My soup looked like an above ground pool in a bad neighborhood.

#12 k43

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 11:01 AM

Oxalic acid crystallizes in tiny, thin spikes that puncture the skin and are almost impossible to remove. Be careful to keep it away from your mouth or eyes, and always wear gloves. It will make your tongue swell up so badly that some people have suffocated.

It's the principal irritant in Dieffenbachia, a/k/a Dumb Cane, which is a lovely decorative plant with large striped leaves, but which should never be in a house with children (or plant-chewing dogs).

#13 markabauman

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 05:00 PM

Personally, I like BKF, however, I know someone who uses spray Lime-A-Way on her All-Clads to get rid of the hazy stuff. Haven't tried it personally; maybe a little cautious, but she says it works and doesn't harm the pans.
Mark A. Bauman

#14 MarkIsCooking

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Posted 27 December 2006 - 06:32 PM

I have both the powder and the liquid.  The powder seems to clean better, but I couldn't tell you why!

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BKF is awesome. I like the powder much better. Depending on how badly the pan needs work, you can vary the amount of water. If the pan is really bad, I use just a moist sponge and lots of BKF. If it's not as bad, you can make more of a paste and for light cleanup, a watery consistency does the trick. Shine on!

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#15 qrn

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 12:26 PM

BKF is oxalic acid which dissolves the haze. I have some copper pans that I use it on. A real thin watery coat cleans up the oxidized copper nicely, and if you dont rub hard it will not take the shine off of the copper.
Bud

#16 Bonnie Ruth

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 03:42 PM

Where can I buy Barkeepers Friend?

#17 Chris Amirault

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 03:45 PM

Here at the BKF website or at your local grocery, Sur Le Table, or Williams Sonoma store.
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#18 ChefCrash

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Posted 28 December 2006 - 06:42 PM

I read somewhere that the haze is caused by coagulated proteins. A little white vinegar will dissolve it instantly.

By the time we were done blackening the fish in this photo, the burnt oil you see was completely black (inside and out).
Posted Image

I used BKF twice, then decided I wasn't gonna be All Clad's slave. I used a BRILLO pad inside and out. The shiny exterior is a lot more durable than you think.

I threw away the messy BKF can.

#19 Mottmott

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Posted 31 December 2006 - 07:32 PM

Bring inherently lazy, I've given up that sort of browning/blackening over to my cast iron pans. When I do need to clean my SS, it's BKF.
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#20 slkinsey

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 08:06 AM

The discoloration on stainless steel cookware commonly caused by cooking over high heat is called "heat tint." It is not caused by coagulated proteins, or anything having to do with the food that is cooked in the pan. You can, in fact, produce heat tint in a stainless steel pan by heating it on the stove with nothing in it whatsoever. At around 350C/660F and higher, the stainless steel reacts with oxygen in the air to form an oxide layer. That oxide layer is the heat tint.

Heat tint is not the same thing as the blackness that develops on a pan when fat is heated to high temperature. That is polymerized fat. It's quite durable, as efforts to remove it demonstrate, and can be relatively slick compared to other surfaces. The blackness comes from carbon that is bound up in the polymerized fat. "Seasoned" cast iron takes advantage of polymerized fat to form a less reactive and less "sticky" coating on the raw iron.
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#21 weinoo

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 03:26 AM

I have at least three All-Clad non-stick pans (8" & 10" fry pans, 12" saute) - that are from the original Master Chef line, very thick, heavy, made in the USA, etc. They have held up remarkable well, even though on occasion I am sure I've used metal utensils and been a bit rough with them.

Over time, these pans have all developed a bit of, for want of a better word, an oily surface, that I find impossible to clean back to the original state, although the oiliness has not affected their performance one iota.

I have tried various methods of scrubbing to no avail (scrubbies, doobies and various powders and pastes, along with lots of elbow grease) and was wondering if anyone has a kitchen secret that might help me restore these pans to "showroom" condition?
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#22 slkinsey

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 08:08 AM

Is this oily surface on the inside or the outside? I assume it's on the inside? My best guess is that it may be polymerized fat. Does the oily surface cover the entire cooking surface of the pan? If it's polymerized fat, I don't see how you'd get it off without scrubbing away the PTFE coating. If you're talking about the exterior of the pan, you might try finding an aluminum-safe pan and oven cleaner.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#23 budrichard

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 08:25 AM

Did you use Pam in those pans?
Pam leaves a residue that is sometime impossible to remove. Pam has recently introduced a supposedly Pro high Heat version to avoid the residue buildup http://www.pam4you.c...ional/index.jsp

I don't and won't use any of thier products.-Dick

#24 weinoo

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 01:07 PM

Yes, the oily surface is on the inside...and covers pretyy much the entire surface.

No, I have never used PAM on these pans.

How does the fat polymerize, Sam?
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#25 slkinsey

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 01:13 PM

How does the fat polymerize, Sam?

High heat cooking.

Have you ever cooked something at high heat in a stainless pan and when you're done there is a light brown residue (usually around the inner sides of the pan) that is tough to scour away? That is polymerized fat. Polymerized fat is also the "seasoning" that builds up on cast iron cookware.

If that's what it is, I have some good news and some bad news. The good news is that it's relatively easy to keep cookware free of built-up polymerized fat: just make sure you diligently clean it all away after every use. The bad news is that once it does build up, it is very difficult to clean away without resorting to chemical means. I've spent as long as 20 minutes working on the outside of a Calphalon frypan scrubbing as hard as I can with Bar Keeper's Friend and a brand new Scotch Brite pad, and still didn't get it all off. The further bad news is that, as you may imagine, the treatment I just described is not advised for a PTFE-coated surface. Indeed, the polymerized fat is harder than the PTFE coating, so there is little hope of scouring it off or dissolving it with chemicals without hurting the nonstick surface.


The moral of this story is that PTFE coated pans shouldn't be used for high heat cooking unless they are "throwaway" nonstick pans you expect to burn through and replace in a year or less.

Edited by slkinsey, 10 October 2007 - 01:20 PM.

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#26 weinoo

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 01:23 PM

How does the fat polymerize, Sam?

High heat cooking.

Have you ever cooked something at high heat in a stainless pan and when you're done there is a light brown residue (usually around the inner sides of the pan) that is tough to scour away? That is polymerized fat. Polymerized fat is also the "seasoning" that builds up on cast iron cookware.

The moral of this story is that PTFE coated pans shouldn't be used for high heat cooking unless they are "throwaway" nonstick pans you expect to burn through and replace in a year or less.

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That's the stuff! With stainless, it's easy enough to remove with steel wool, but obviously I would not resort to that on the non-stick coating.

It's interesting, because I don't really use "high-heat" per se, but I do pre-heat my saute and fry pans before cooking in them - but only over moderate heat. I guess I just haven't been as diligent as is needed after every use.
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#27 slkinsey

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 01:53 PM

I think one of the best ways to keep a PTFE coated surface clean is to immediately spray it down with hot water as soon as you take the food out of it -- while it's still warm and none of the oil has had a chance to bond to the surface. If you let an oily residue sit on a PTFE surface, my experience is that it does like to stick around.
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#28 BigboyDan

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 03:49 PM

slkinsey has it right. You may need to rethink how you cook certain items.

In a commercial kitchen we use non-stick pans made by Carlise, Vollrath, etc. for omlets and quick vegetable saute. A nonstick coated pan shoulod never be used over high heat - over 375 F. We replace the non-sticks pans every four months. For high heat saute we always use well seasoned steel French-style fry pans or stainless steel pans.

#29 moreace01

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Posted 11 October 2007 - 07:00 AM

I have the same problem in a nonstick pan that, to be honest, is only used for eggs or grilled cheese. So it's really not high heat cooking (except when I'm not paying attention). But I do have a tendency to let it sit around without cleaning it right away. I'll try to be more diligent about washing it immediatly and see what happens. Every once in awhile, the "oil slick" doesn't seem to span as much surface as it used to. I'm really not sure what I'm doing to make it go away though.

#30 edwardsboi

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Posted 12 June 2009 - 11:37 AM

Oxalic acid crystallizes in tiny, thin spikes that puncture the skin and are almost impossible to remove.  Be careful to keep it away from your mouth or eyes, and always wear gloves.  It will make your tongue swell up so badly that some people have suffocated.

It's the principal irritant in Dieffenbachia, a/k/a Dumb Cane, which is a lovely decorative plant with large striped leaves, but which should never be in a house with children (or plant-chewing dogs).

View Post


So, does this mean that one shouldn't use Bar Keepers Friend to clean the inside, especially with those difficult-to-clean fond residue? And, instead use it only for the outside of the pan?

If its that hazardous, it seems dangerous to clean the inside of an All-Clad pan with it and then use that same pan to cook something.

From All-Clad's instructions for cleaning the stainless steel interior:

Use a fine powder cleanser with water to form a paste. Aplly paste using a soft cloth. Rub in a circular motion from the center outword. DO NOT USE oven cleaners or cleaners with chlorine bleach


But, they never say what this fine powder cleanser is supposed to be.