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Alternative uses for vegetables


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Kouign Aman

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Posted 16 October 2006 - 10:37 AM

I couldnt resist asking.

But seriously,
how would you bring vegetables to center stage in planning a meal?
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#2 Jose Andres

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 10:44 AM

I couldnt resist asking.

But seriously,
how would you bring vegetables to center stage in planning a meal?

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By treating them, and fruits, with the respect they deserve.....To me is nothing more fascinating than a Coulifloer or and Orange...They are Sweet, Sour, They have texture, unique flavors....More interesting than the best piece of meat on earth.......Happens that we are still Hommos Neanderthalis....and we have a need of meat....But the men of the future will be a men of Vegetables and Fruits.......With fish and meat being a side dish........in 200 years you will see

#3 Pontormo

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 11:10 AM

Thank you for saying this!

By the way, Heinz Thomet, the bearded Swiss farmer at Dupont Circle on Sundays, was VERY surprised to learn that his picture prefaces the chapter on potatoes in your cookbook.

Minor question: Why do you specify Idaho potatoes instead of waxier varieties in your recipes?

Edited by Pontormo, 18 October 2006 - 11:13 AM.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#4 srhcb

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 11:59 AM

I couldnt resist asking.

But seriously,
how would you bring vegetables to center stage in planning a meal?

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I was almost afraid to touch this topic with a ten foot .... carrot, but, how about This for the centerpiece of a vegetable themed dinner? :rolleyes:

SB (had one once)

#5 Jose Andres

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:15 PM

Thank you for saying this!

By the way, Heinz Thomet, the bearded Swiss farmer at Dupont Circle on Sundays, was VERY surprised to learn that his picture prefaces the chapter on potatoes in your cookbook.

Minor question:  Why do you specify Idaho potatoes instead of waxier varieties in your recipes?

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I hope Heinz is not mad at me! He never say anything to me about it. Is a good foto no?..........I LOVE the Dupont farmers market! All the farmers who come to sell are important to me. I am a big supporter of all the markets in the area and small farmers and Tuscarora...........it is important to have fresh vegetables and fruits available in hte city and to keep alive some of these traditions.

Idaho potatoes usually are drier and have more starch. Could also be russet. I think they work better for some recipes especially when you bake or fry. They also thicken because they fall apart

#6 Pontormo

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 12:43 PM

It is a GREAT photo, yes!

He's not at all angry, just amused....and too busy to go to a bookstore to take a peep. I use his brilliant yellow potatoes to make your patatas a la Riojana and tortilla.

The recent growth in farmers markets goes hand-in-hand with the increasing profile and virtues of wonderful restaurants in our city, including yours of course. I know what you have done to help the development of the FRESHFARM market in Penn Quarter.

While a love of prosciutto may have thrown me into the arms of Spanish food, I have to say (again) that the spinach tapa at Jaleo is one of my favorite dishes. I especially like the way you use fruits as well as vegetables in savory tapas.

I am not sure how much you ask farmers to grow produce you can't find in other places. However, Heinz, for example, grows experimental crops that he doesn't bring to the market unless asked. After searching for cardoons without any success, I mentioned my quest to him. This Sunday he's bringing a second bunch to Dupont Circle just for me. For a home cook not used to this kind of direct relationship to farmers, this kind of personal response is special.

Edited by Pontormo, 18 October 2006 - 12:51 PM.

"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#7 Jose Andres

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 01:51 PM

It is a GREAT photo, yes!

He's not at all angry, just amused....and too busy to go to a bookstore to take a peep.  I use his brilliant yellow potatoes to make your patatas a la Riojana and tortilla.

The recent growth in farmers markets goes hand-in-hand with the increasing profile and virtues of wonderful restaurants in our city, including yours of course.  I know what you have done to help the development of the FRESHFARM market in Penn Quarter.

While a love of prosciutto may have thrown me into the arms of Spanish food, I have to say (again) that the spinach tapa at Jaleo is one of my favorite dishes.  I especially like the way you use fruits as well as vegetables in savory tapas.

I am not sure how much you ask farmers to grow produce you can't find in other places.  However, Heinz, for example, grows experimental crops that he doesn't bring to the market unless asked.  After searching for cardoons without any success, I mentioned my quest to him.  This Sunday he's bringing a second bunch to Dupont Circle just for me.  For a home cook not used to this kind of direct relationship to farmers, this kind of personal response is special.

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Combining sweet and savory is a very Catalan thing. let's you get that balance.

I want calcots and I would love to see someone try to grow them in America. Years back I convince an Amish guy to sell me his zucchini flowers. he thought I was crazy.

#8 Brett Emerson

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 11:22 PM

Combining sweet and savory is a very Catalan thing. let's you get that balance.

I want calcots and I would love to see someone try to grow them in America. Years back I convince an Amish guy to sell me his zucchini flowers. he thought I was crazy.

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I'd love to see calçots, too, so that we could celebrate a calçotada. I brought some piquillo pepper seeds back last year and asked a local farmer to grow them in our northern California soil. The result was fantastic (although a lot more work than the excellent canned peppers from Lodosa!). The same farmer also grows excellent pimientos de padrón. My next project is to find a farmer to grow some piel de sapo melons next year - I brought the seeds back from my latest trip in August.

Chef Andrés, are there any other fruits and vegetables that you miss from Spain that you would like to see grown in the US?
Brett Emerson

My food blog: In Praise of Sardines

#9 Dorine

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Posted 20 October 2006 - 07:55 PM

Combining sweet and savory is a very Catalan thing. let's you get that balance.

I want calcots and I would love to see someone try to grow them in America. Years back I convince an Amish guy to sell me his zucchini flowers. he thought I was crazy.

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How very interesting! My friends from Castilla la Vieja through Andalucía consistently condemn Americans for eating sweet and savory together!


¡No me diga! Mis amigos españoles de Castilla la Vieja a Andalucía desprecian a los EEUUenses por comer el dulce junto con lo salado.


Nowadays you will find most Amish farmers, at least the ones in Lancaster Co., PA, a lot mor sophisticated and perfectly ready to charge you premium prices for their zucchini blossoms. You will find them even growing two colors of tomatillos, and if you form a relationship with one who is to supply your restaurant and tell him where to get the seeds, he will cheerfully grow calcots for you, too. I can even put you in touch with 2 or 3 to talk to if you want.