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"Baking: From My Home to Yours" (Part 1)


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#31 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 09:40 AM

Kit, I'd be happy to hop on your bandwagon. Sadly, I don't think we're going to see a shift to weights and scales -- it's just so counter to the way we've always done things. I'm not unhappy with volume measures but, like you, I find weighing ingredients much easier and, as you said, more accurate.

#32 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 09:50 AM

Maybe I'm supposed to wait until November to ask questions about a specific recipes but...if it's okay, I have a question about the arborio rice pudding. I made that recipe and it was wonderful tasting but it never firmed up in the frig. I cooked it a little longer than the 30 min. recommended because it still looked really runny. Should I have just kept going? I bake a lot but this was my first attempt at rice pudding so I'm no expert.

Anyway, I love your books and I'm looking forward to baking the winter away!

#33 rickster

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 11:22 AM

For people who don't live near a club store, I saw this book at both Borders and Barnes & Noble in the Chicago area last weekend, even though it is not available on their online sites yet.

#34 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 12:19 PM

Jean, this is not a firm rice pudding (although, if you add the chocolate it is firmer). What was your texture like? Simple as it is, there can be several variables with rice pudding. The cooking time can vary based on the heat you have under the pan and the size of the pan. Low on one range is medium on another. Cooking the mixture longer was a good idea -- you need to boil away the milk until you see the kernels at the top of the pot. If you'd like a thicker pudding, next time reduce the milk to about 2 3/4 cups to 3 cups (but don't do this if you want to make the chocolate version). I'm glad you liked the flavor -- I do too.

#35 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 01:15 PM

Thank you! I made both the vanilla and chocolate version and I did notice that the chocolate version was slightly thicker. I think I'll take your advice and add a little less milk.

#36 kitwilliams

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 02:42 PM

Kit, I'd be happy to hop on your bandwagon.  Sadly, I don't think we're going to see a shift to weights and scales -- it's just so counter to the way we've always done things.  I'm not unhappy with volume measures but, like you, I find weighing ingredients much easier and, as you said, more accurate.

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Thanks for the empathy, Dorie, and the insights into this dilemma from both you and Dan. And if anyone out there in egulletland is writing a baking book in the future, I am now available for hire in order to test and convert your recipes!
kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"
Weebl

#37 JFLinLA

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 06:08 PM

For people who don't live near a club store, I saw this book at both Borders and Barnes & Noble in the Chicago area last weekend, even though it is not available on their online sites yet.

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Amazon claims they are already shipping it!
So long and thanks for all the fish.

#38 JFLinLA

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 06:11 PM

Kit, I'd be happy to hop on your bandwagon.  Sadly, I don't think we're going to see a shift to weights and scales -- it's just so counter to the way we've always done things.  I'm not unhappy with volume measures but, like you, I find weighing ingredients much easier and, as you said, more accurate.

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Thanks for the empathy, Dorie, and the insights into this dilemma from both you and Dan. And if anyone out there in egulletland is writing a baking book in the future, I am now available for hire in order to test and convert your recipes!

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Or you can follow my routine. Once I try a recipe, if I decide I like it, I'll weigh everything the next time I make it and just write the wieghts right into my cookbook. (Yea, I'm sure you pros do this all the time but I was pretty proud of myself the first time I figured this out.)

By the way, picked up the book on Friday and spent the weekend reading it. (Yes, I read all my new cookbooks first.) I'm stunned. There are so many recipes I want to try. I just need more occasions for baking. The book makes me sooooo happy. :biggrin:
So long and thanks for all the fish.

#39 alanamoana

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Posted 12 September 2006 - 07:42 PM

actually, if it is a recipe that i like and use frequently, i'll weigh it out several time and take an average of the weights so that it is more accurate. especially with the flour and other dry ingredients. liquid, not so much.

#40 Patrick S

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 07:15 AM

I keep a sheet with a list of common ingredient weights taped to the inside of one of my cabinet doors. I consult that as I'm assembling ingredients, so I weigh everything the first time around, rather than each time measuring out volumes and weighing them.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#41 SusanGiff

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 08:26 AM

Is this going to work the way some other baking threads have (I'm thinking of "Baking with Julia," which I followed but didn't join) in which the group picks a recipe to try and reports on the results? Or you just going to have at it?

I bought the book last week and am overwhelmed by choice, so I wouldn't mind if someone else decided for me! Many, many of the recipes look really tempting. I'd pretty much decided to start with the World Peace Cookies, but I could certainly be swayed by some other consensus of opinion.

Susan

#42 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 08:29 AM

Susan, I think starting with World Peace Cookies is a great idea!

#43 Patrick S

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 09:36 AM

I recieved Dorie's new book last week. Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

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"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#44 Dorie Greenspan

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 10:12 AM

Oh Patrick! As always, your desserts are GORGEOUS!! I know you and the other members have heard me say this before on other threads, but it's an extraordinary thrill for me to see what everyone does from my books and to know that people are enjoying the recipes. THANK YOU!

#45 apronstrings

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 11:03 AM

Susan, I think starting with World Peace Cookies is a great idea!

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:laugh: I prepared the World Peace cookies today (serving them next week, along with 2 other of your desserts from the book). I used Slitti bittersweet 73% discs, and added a dash of cinnamon to the dough. I froze the dough for an hour, and they sliced without any problem. I wished SOME dough would have crumbled a bit so that I could taste it. I just HAD to eat one! They were exactly as you said. Just fabulous, and I love the way the salt pointed up the flavor. They will be devoured, I am sure... I have a related question. These were originally called Korova cookies. How do you pronounce that? When I say it it sounds like they were baked by a Jewish Prostitute!!! Thanks!!

#46 FoodMan

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 12:08 PM

I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

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Absolutely stunning work Patrick! My only complain: where are the rest of the pictures?! This is a tease.

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#47 RuthWells

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 12:10 PM

I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

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Leave it to Patrick! Gorgeous!

Edited by RuthWells, 13 September 2006 - 12:10 PM.


#48 ludja

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 12:23 PM

Is thet the bookcover? :wink:
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#49 SweetSide

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 02:29 PM

I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

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More food porn! I haven't seen the book yet, but will be ordering soon -- sooner now after this picture! (Dorie, you're going to owe Patrick royalties... :wink: :raz: )
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#50 SusanGiff

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Posted 13 September 2006 - 05:50 PM

The photography in the book is stunning, but that picture certainly wouldn't be out of place.

#51 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 07:36 AM

Today is my birthday. So last night, I deided to make myself a birthday cake and I also decided to have a piece, one day early.

I made the cake on the cover of the cookbook. Wow! It was very chocolatey but not too much. The frosting was light and just the right combination with the chocolate. Instructions were perfect and it's such a pretty little cake. I've GOT to learn how to post pictures!

#52 John DePaula

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 09:26 AM

I recieved Dorie's new book last week.  Its a large book, with 300 recipes, and I can tell already that I'm going to have a lot of fun baking from it, for a long time to come. This past weekend, I tried my first recipe from it -- the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake (p. 264). Its delicious!

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Oh, that one drip of caramel down the side... PERFECT!
John DePaula
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Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
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When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

#53 Patrick S

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 10:17 AM

Absolutely stunning work Patrick! My only complain: where are the rest of the pictures?! This is a tease.

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I'd be happy to show you some more pictures. :raz:

I'm also going to start adding links to my larger and higher-quality images on Flickr, since ImageGullet always resamples my images to lower quality/smaller file size versions. Here are two more images of the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake.

Photo1

Photo2
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#54 iii_bake

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 05:42 AM

Absolutely stunning work Patrick! My only complain: where are the rest of the pictures?! This is a tease.

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I'd be happy to show you some more pictures. :raz:

I'm also going to start adding links to my larger and higher-quality images on Flickr, since ImageGullet always resamples my images to lower quality/smaller file size versions. Here are two more images of the caramel peanut-topped brownie cake.

Photo1

Photo2

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Need a piece, can u DHL to me over here? :wink:

#55 Lesley C

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 07:28 AM

Wow Patrick, I just love that picture with the fork.
Now I have to make that cake!

#56 ALTAF

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Posted 15 September 2006 - 01:42 PM

Amazing photos patrick. can't wait to recive my book

#57 Patrick S

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 06:03 AM

I tried the marbled banana/chocolate loaf cake over the weekend, and it is also very good, if a little dense on the bottom (probably should have mashed the bananas more). I have a picture of it on Flickr.

ETA: Here is the smaller, ImageGullet version:

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Edited by Patrick S, 18 September 2006 - 07:24 AM.

"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#58 Lesley C

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 06:28 AM

Another gorgeous picture Patrick. Very inspirational. Now I have to make that cake too.
Meanwhile, I made the tarte Tatin last night and it was the best ever -- and I've made hundreds of tarte Tatins. I should have snapped a picture because it tasted as good as it looked. Thank you Dorie!

#59 Joni

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 07:37 AM

Just bought mine from Costco yesterday...and was hoping someone had started a thread on it! Thanks for your reviews so far!

#60 FoodMan

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 01:29 PM

Finally got my copy!

So, because of Patrick's picture perfect..err...picture of that caramel peanut chocolate cake, I had that combo on my mind. Who doesn't love it, like the Geico geko would say 'It's peanuts and caramel AND chocolates for free'. Well not really free, but you get the idea.

I also did not want to bypass all 300 recipes and make that same cake. Then I stumbled on (sorry book is at home and I am not sure of the exact name) the chocolate ganache tart with a layer of caramel peanuts called something like "Crunchy Posh chocolate Tart"! perfect!

Since there is no way I can take better pictures than Patrick or make a better looking pastry, I opted for quantity over quality. So, I give you four, count them FOUR non-Flickr pictures of this gloriuosly rich tart instead of just one. It is absolutly awsome but I did like it more slightly chilled rather than at room temperature as recommended by the book. A little cool the tart does not feel as rich and the peanut-caramel layer gets nice and chewy and a little crunchy. Also I rolled the dough instead of pressing it in the pan which in my experience takes longer and is never even. Rolling it was a breeze between two lightly floured wax papers and took no more than 4 or 5 minutes.

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E. Nassar
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