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Dealing with severe food allergies and sensitivities


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#1 tippingvelvet

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 07:56 AM

Need some breakfast ideas for the dairy intolerant - no cheese or eggs. Tired of the bagels, toast, and muffins. Any suggestions???

#2 Jason Perlow

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 07:58 AM

Well, eggs don't really qualify as dairy. Since, they like, come from chickens and not cows.

But I would go the bacon and sausage route with the bagels and toast.
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#3 Jinmyo

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 08:30 AM

No muffins. Steak.

Seriously.
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#4 Mottmott

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 08:38 AM

Sometimes a problem can be turned into an adventure.

Check out the polenta thread. Fried polenta with maple syrup is a great breakfast. You can vary it by doing the same with grits. And if you're not a vegetarian, try some Philadelphia scrapple which is pork and cornmeal.

I would think that pancakes and waffles can be made with soy or rice milk.

Also, think out of the box. Many of the things we eat for other meals can serve for the first meal of the day. There is much benefit in making breakfast the main meal of the day. The principal drawback, time, can be handled with some careful planning. After all, what's wrong with soup or stew on a cold morning? Fried chicken livers are quick and a great breakfast.
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#5 Jinmyo

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 08:54 AM

Quite agree with Mottmott.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#6 KNorthrup

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 10:53 AM

Congee?

#7 rozrapp

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 03:25 PM

You mention that you eat muffins. All the muffin recipes I know of include eggs. So, presuming that you are not against using eggs as an ingredient in a recipe, you could make pancakes -- plain, blueberry, apple, etc. Where the recipe calls for milk, substitute non-dairy soy "milk."

#8 MatthewB

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 03:38 PM

No muffins. Steak.

Seriously.

Word, Jin.

A strip steak--a tad less than medium rare--is quick & simple for breakfast. :wub:

#9 Jinmyo

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 04:45 PM

Yes, or just some slices of leftover strip steak.

Or a few bones from prime rib to gnaw on.

That's breakfast.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#10 MatthewB

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 04:50 PM

Yes, or just some slices of leftover strip steak.

Or a few bones from prime rib to gnaw on.

That's breakfast.

Leftover prime rib chunks mixed into a roasted root veggie hash.

That's actually one of my favorite breakfasts. (But topped w/ two poached eggs.)

#11 guajolote

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Posted 21 August 2003 - 04:59 PM

Chilequiles or Enchiladas or a big bowl of menudo :smile: .


#12 sugarhill

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 10:14 PM

how do i make anything, ie a birthday treat with [out] that? so many butter alternatives have either dairy or soy additives... what's a girl to do?

a thought was some type of fresh fruit tart... the mom said maybe an apple tart... which immediately got me thinking about frangipane... but that requires egg.

any suggestions???

#13 merstar

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 11:32 PM

This is supposed to be excellent, although I haven't personally tried it. It was developed during WWII when eggs, milk, butter, etc. were rationed, and was called Wacky Cake or Crazy Cake. You can frost it with a Chocolate Water Glaze using bittersweet chocolate or with a glaze/icing of Dutched cocoa, confectioner's sugar, boiling water, and a little vanilla extract.

Crazy Chocolate Cake
http://www.recipezaar.com/53524

Chocolate Water Glaze (Susan Purdy)
http://www.recipezaar.com/89594

Edited by merstar, 05 June 2006 - 01:13 AM.

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#14 Abra

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:18 AM

Try this delicious sesame cake.

#15 Darcie B

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:37 AM

How about a fruit crisp? Use shortening instead of butter for the streusel topping. I did this for a friend who is allergic to dairy and soy and she really liked it. You could serve it with cool whip. I try to make a special dessert for this friend when she comes over and it really challenges my creativity, since I'm a real butter fiend.

Last time she was over I made a mango sorbet. It was excellent. You could serve that with a crisp cookie of some sort, like a spiced shortbread made with shortening. Using spices partially makes up for the lack of butter flavor and it would add an extra texture dimension with the crispness. Good luck!
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#16 Alex

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 08:21 AM

Chef Sato's Chocolate Raspberry cake meets your criteria and is festive and delicious. The recipe calls for soy milk but I strongly suspect you could substitute rice milk or almond milk. It's too long to list the entire recipe here, but if you like I can fax it to you. Just let me know via PM.
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#17 rjwong

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 08:29 AM

Is using coconut milk okay?
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#18 nightscotsman

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 09:09 AM

This is supposed to be excellent, although I haven't personally tried it. It was developed during WWII when eggs, milk, butter, etc. were rationed, and was called Wacky Cake or Crazy Cake.  You can frost it with a Chocolate Water Glaze using bittersweet chocolate or with a glaze/icing of Dutched cocoa, confectioner's sugar, boiling water, and a little vanilla extract.

Crazy Chocolate Cake
http://www.recipezaar.com/53524

Chocolate Water Glaze (Susan Purdy)
http://www.recipezaar.com/89594

View Post

I know it may look like this cake would just make a chocolate flavored hockey puck, most variations produce a very moist cake with great texture. Make sure you use enough cocoa and maybe boost the flavor with a bit of espresso powder. It keeps very well and the flavor is actually better the second day.

#19 tsquare

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 11:49 AM

This is supposed to be excellent, although I haven't personally tried it. It was developed during WWII when eggs, milk, butter, etc. were rationed, and was called Wacky Cake or Crazy Cake.  You can frost it with a Chocolate Water Glaze using bittersweet chocolate or with a glaze/icing of Dutched cocoa, confectioner's sugar, boiling water, and a little vanilla extract.

Crazy Chocolate Cake
http://www.recipezaar.com/53524

Chocolate Water Glaze (Susan Purdy)
http://www.recipezaar.com/89594

View Post

I know it may look like this cake would just make a chocolate flavored hockey puck, most variations produce a very moist cake with great texture. Make sure you use enough cocoa and maybe boost the flavor with a bit of espresso powder. It keeps very well and the flavor is actually better the second day.

View Post


Yup, these cakes are pretty tasty. We used to make and sell them in a college coffee house in the mid 70's. The carob version was even okay. A german chocolate type frosting is nice too. Can those be done without butter?

#20 Pam R

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 12:29 PM

This may be completely not what you're looking for - but what about something like an ice cream cake - using fruit sorbet instead. You could make a crust, or layers using almonds/hazelnuts or a cookie base (kosher for Passover parve margarine is dairy/soy free) and make some sorbet with fresh fruit.

Good luck!

#21 Eden

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 02:33 PM

for a birthday cake I second the War-era cake reccomendation. It's great!

For more general snacks I make Eggless Ginger Cookies or Eggless Oatmeal cookies. you can either use a soy-free crisco like product or shell out the bucks for goat butter if that's an option (Meyerburg? makes one that's pricey, but not at all goaty)

I know it seems daunting at first glance to avoid all those, but it's not that hard - there are a ton of online resources these days to help - and your friends with allergies will really appreciate the effort!
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#22 sugarhill

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Posted 06 June 2006 - 05:49 PM

i guess i should mention that the bday party is for a 3 yr old... so i suspect getting her to eat a sesame cake may be difficult! :) the crisp sounds good, the sorbet with the eggless ginger cookies also sounds interesting especially during the heat of the summer.

shortening can be a tricky thing as most are soy-based. the nut milk may be a viable alternative... may have to check on allergies to that.

thanks... i'll let you know what happens.

#23 beccaboo

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 05:37 AM

shortening can be a tricky thing as most are soy-based. 

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Spectrum and Earth Balance non-hydrogenated shortenings are made of palm oil, I think. Not soy, anyway.

#24 SweetSide

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 06:14 AM

shortening can be a tricky thing as most are soy-based. 

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Spectrum and Earth Balance non-hydrogenated shortenings are made of palm oil, I think. Not soy, anyway.

View Post


Spectrum is palm oil only. Earth Balance is a combination of oils and includes soy on their ingredient list.
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#25 Desiderio

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 12:55 AM

Funny tonight at work I found the recepie for the crazy chocolate cake on one of the newspaper around , I thought was fun , you guys mentioned here and after a couple of days the recepie is on the paper .
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#26 Maliaty

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 01:36 AM

For my 2c, I have a 2 yr old who is v allergic to egg. My creative solution...
jello. He thinks it is v interesting because of the texture and certainly doesn't mind the sugar.

Watch out for commercial sorbets, because some contain egg whites. Definite downer.

Australians have a no-egg cookie - the ANZAC biscuit. Substitute the butter with margarine and you should be right, mate (as we say down under)
http://www.aussiesla...ac-biscuits.asp

I second the cake with no egg approach - one way of dealing with the dryness that I have read about, but not tried (yet) for what it's worth is to add a gelatin mix. I usually add tofu, but that won't work for you.

I say go the jello. It's a 3 yr old. What's not to love!

Cheers
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#27 Rebecca263

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 04:41 AM

We use fruit instead of fats almost exclusively when we bake. Usually the go to ingredient is applesauce. This makes for a very moist cake, even without eggs.
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#28 s_sevilla

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 02:02 PM

I'm cooking for a person with the following allergies (most will cause severe anaphylactic shock with minimal quantities consumed):

Milk, dairy (anything that might contain casein)
eggs
nuts
shellfish
fish
gluten

Any suggestions for recipes or substitutions that could be used. I'm especially interested if there is a recipe out there for rice bread.

Thanks.

#29 vinelady

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 04:05 PM

I know that more than a few of the Gluten free cookbooks have recipes for bread and for pizza dough. There are also a number on the web.

#30 Torrilin

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 04:50 PM

Will this be regular cooking or just once in a while?

For once in a while, I'd ask the person what they get served a lot of because it's "easy", and if there's anything that is safe that they don't get to eat often. I'd imagine fruit iced desserts (granitas, sherberts, anything milk free) would be a nice treat. Most sauces are probably seen as off limits, but reductions should be fine. Gluten problems can be a pretty big deal... in some cases they pretty much eliminate all grains from the diet.

Be *very* careful in serving processed foods to this person. Gluten is hidden in many processed foods where you wouldn't expect it. Eggs, seafood and nuts are usually pretty identifiable. Casein is probably hiding in a lot of products one wouldn't expect it in either.

I did find this recipe for gluten free pizza dough. It is *not* safe for the person you're cooking for. Searching for celiac pizza on google brings up a fair number of other results. My internet connection is being wonky and won't let me check most of them tho.

Emily
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