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Playing with Food


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#31 Genny

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 03:08 PM

Someone I know used to put peanut butter on their dog's lips (or that area under the nose -- I don't think dogs have lips), and prop him up while he was trying to lick it off, and film him with JFK's "we choose to go to the moon" speech playing in the background. 

It wasn't me, really.

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You absolutely never fail to make me laugh Fabby! We used to give the dog pb too, but only when he was dressed in my castoff jeans (cut a hole to pull his tail thru) and t-shirts cuz dogs can't eat peanut butter. :biggrin:

We made the marshmallow taffy too!!! Yeah it wasn't just us!! My mom thought it was disgusting though and highly discouraged it.

Oreo's #1: Roll the filling into balls to eat. #2 try to see how many fillings you could stack by twisting off one side of two cookies, putting the filling together and then twist off one of the cookies and add another cookie filling. Repeat as often as mom lets you!

Red Vines: straws!!!! Best with Coke!

Halloween Food Fun: peanut shells on the floor = bones; grapes in the bowl = eyeballs; cold cooked spaghetti = brain matter (there are more but I've forgotten them!)

JELLO! Who doesn't play with this wiggly-jiggly food??? They even encourage it in their marketing!

I've read that some people have fun playing with their food in the bedroom...but I wouldn't know anything about whipped cream, chocolate sauce or other such stuff. :cool:

#32 mizducky

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Posted 22 September 2006 - 03:51 PM

My grandson Zach, like most three year old boys, is an expert when it comes to playing with food!  He considers the tactile, aerodynamic and adhesive properties of his meal just as important as the flavor.

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JELLO!  Who doesn't play with this wiggly-jiggly food???  They even encourage it in their marketing!

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These two posts have caused me to remember one of the funniest, albeit hazardous, food-play events I have ever witnessed: the Jello tug of war to end all Jello tug of wars.

It was a morale event staged by the department of the Large Seattle-Area Software Company (who shall remain nameless :laugh: ) that I used to work for. It actually started off as a fund-raising challenge for the annual United Way fund drive. Anyway, two program managers signed up to captain two tug-of-war teams, and I think they got kind of competitive in the team sign-ups. The department director's administrative assistant (used to being den mother for these Animal House-style events) spent a few days making trash-cans-ful of raspberry gelatin. The event, for some bizarre reason, was staged not outdoors, but indoors in our lovely two-story atrium, with only a few plastic tarps protecting the ivory wall-to-wall carpet from the waiting vat of gelatinous goo. First there was a big party, with a pick-up band and everything, and lotsa cheap beer--which of course the programmers inhaled like fish in water. After all sorts of posturing and trash-talking by the various team heads and members, the actual main event was almost an anticlimax--it was mere minutes before one team succeeded in hauling the other through the big vat of Jello, scattering it in all directions. Lots of whooping and hollering, and jello-sodden competitors standing around dripping ...

And then I noticed various beer-sodden techies picking up handfuls of jello, and obviously thinking about their *aerodynamic properties* ... and that's when I decided to make my exit. :wacko:

When I came into work the next morning, the atrium carpet looked like it had been shampooed within an inch of its life, but there was still a faint pink stain where the vat of Jello had stood ... :laugh:

I seriously doubt anybody got in trouble, though. This was not by any means the first time this particular department head had actively encouraged mayhem verging on property destruction by his team, often involving aerodynamic food play (i.e. "ship parties" during which drunken techies roamed the halls looking for victims to spray with cheap "champagne," etc). In fact, he was known for proudly proclaiming at our weekly morale/status meetings that we were "the most feared and hated department" in our company. Animal House indeed!

#33 petite tête de chou

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Posted 28 September 2006 - 02:49 PM

This guy *really* knows how to play with his food! Too funny.
Shelley: Would you like some pie?
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#34 Tmnoland

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 07:54 AM

In Chinese cuisine, there are certain vegetables with a hollow stem -- I think "water spinach" is one of them -- that one can use as a straw to suck up sauces or your beverage. My mom always had to stop me from doing that.

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Sure :smile: And Twizzlers cherry licorice work well too.

And then there's peanut butter play dough - equal parts uncooked oatmeal, dry milk, peanut butter and honey. Not too bad for the kiddos.

Therese
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#35 miladyinsanity

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 08:51 AM

In Chinese cuisine, there are certain vegetables with a hollow stem -- I think "water spinach" is one of them -- that one can use as a straw to suck up sauces or your beverage. My mom always had to stop me from doing that.

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I think you mean watercress?
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#36 Kouign Aman

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 10:46 AM

The munchkin took each of her noodles last night and twirled it about in circles like a rhythmic gymnast (with running commentary) before consuming it.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#37 Pontormo

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 11:32 AM

In Chinese cuisine, there are certain vegetables with a hollow stem -- I think "water spinach" is one of them -- that one can use as a straw to suck up sauces or your beverage. My mom always had to stop me from doing that.

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I think you mean watercress?

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The stem on watercress is pretty tight, whereas there are lots of different kinds of spinach. For a long the only kind available in the U.S. was a crinkly variety with stems that were quite fibrous and sometimes hollow when picked at a mature stage of the plant's life.

However, I found this which looks quite different.

* * *
Fun entries, everyone! I was especially taken with the recipe for play dough. I remember friends whose mothers put together homemade versions, but never with peanut butter. Sounds like a great mess!
"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#38 tejon

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 02:10 PM

Now this is how I like to play with food :laugh: :

Posted Image

Posted Image
Kathy

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#39 Kouign Aman

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 02:20 PM

POST RECIPES! PLEEEEEEASE!

Where did you get the mold for the jello/mac brain?
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#40 scubadoo97

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 07:08 PM

Wow tejon those look so cool. Great for Halloween.

#41 Pontormo

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Posted 29 September 2006 - 07:43 PM

Kathy :shock: !!! Wow :cool:

Are you practicing in advance of Halloween? Making things ahead so they develop mold and get really gross?
"Viciousness in the kitchen.
The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

#42 Andrew Fenton

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 03:48 AM

Simply fantastic, both the brain and the fingers. Kudos.

I'd like to see recipes, too; in the meantime, we zombie-cuisine wannabes can order a braiiiiin mold from its manufacturer-- who else-- Archie McPhee.

edit: though if my knowledge of zombie canon is accurate (and I do think it is), the brain-eating thing didn't come in until "Return of the Living Dead", not "Night of the Living Dead". Come ON, Archie!

Edited by Andrew Fenton, 30 September 2006 - 04:05 AM.


#43 tejon

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 10:43 AM

I made both of these last year, though I've made a brain mold for Halloween every year for almost the past decade. It's a bit of a Halloween tradition in our house!

Here's the cookie recipe. It's actually a rather tasty almond shortbread-ish cookie that happens to hold shape really well.

"Finger" Cookies
makes ~ 5 dozen
Yield: 5 dozen

1 cup butter, softened
1 cup powdered sugar
1 egg
1 tsp almond extract
1 tsp vanilla
2 2/3 cups flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup whole blanched almonds
raspberry jelly

In bowl, beat together butter, sugar, egg, almond extract and vanilla. Stir dry ingredients together, then add to wet and stir thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate 30 minutes.

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Working with one quarter of the dough at a time and keeping remainder refrigerated, roll a scant tablespoon full (I used a 1 oz. cookie scoop) of dough into a thin log shape about 4" long for each cookie. Squeeze clost to center and close to one end to create knuckle shapes. Press almond firmly into the end of the cookie for nail. Using paring knife, make slashes in several places to form knuckle. You want them a bit thin and gangly looking, since they'll puff a little when you bake them.

Place on lightly greased baking sheets (or use silicone sheets or parchment); bake in 325F oven for 20-25 minutes or until pale golden. Let cool for a few minutes.

Meanwhile, melt jelly over low heat in a small saucepan.

Posted Image

Carefully lift almond off of each finger, spoon a tiny amount of jelly onto nail bed and press almond back in place so the jelly oozes out from underneath. You can also make slashes in the finger and fill them with "blood.

You can also form toes - just make the cookies shorter and a bit wider and only add one joint instead of two. No almonds for these, just indent where the nailbed should be and add a bit of melted jelly to highlight once they are baked.

Edited by tejon, 30 September 2006 - 10:55 AM.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

#44 tejon

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Posted 30 September 2006 - 10:51 AM

Here's the recipe for brains....BRAINS!

This recipe was inspired by the one Alton Brown did a few years back. I liked the idea but wasn't thrilled with the recipe, so I came up with my own. By the way, I would suggest getting this mold - it looks a lot more lifelike.

Panna Cotta (brain style) with Pomegranite Sauce

1 cup milk
5 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
4 cups heavy cream
1 cup + 1 Tb sugar, divided
pinch salt
2 Tablespoons vanilla
8 oz. pomegranite juice
1/4 cup cornstarch

Place milk in a small bowl and sprinkle gelatin over the top. Stir and let sit for about five minutes so the gelatin can rehydrate a bit.

Combine cream and sugar in a pan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla and salt. Add the gelatin mixture and stir again until combined. Pour into (brain) mold, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight or until mixture is completely set.

To unmold, gently tilt mold so sides of the panna cotta pull away a bit, then place on platter or plate. You can also dip the bottom of the mold into warm water to help in unmolding.

(For non-brain occasions, pour into small custard cups, ramekins, or a large bowl)

For the pomegranite sauce, I just got a small bottle of Pom Wonderful, added three heaping spoonfuls of sugar so it wasn't so tart, mixed in about 1/4 cup cornstarch, whisked like crazy, then brought it all to a boil in a small saucepan while stirring. The consistancy is rather disgusting, but that's the whole point!

This looks especially creepy set out on a really nice platter. Also quite effective on a carving board with a large chef's knife plunged into the center :wink:.

Edited by tejon, 30 September 2006 - 11:00 AM.

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

#45 FabulousFoodBabe

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 04:40 AM

Kathy! I gave an entire preschool nightmares with the bloody finger cookies. My sons have never forgotten, or forgiven. :laugh:
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#46 azureus

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 06:05 AM

I was definitely not allowed to play with my food when I was a child. Foodplay began when I was at university, and away from my mother's watchful eyes. The "mashed potatoes" served at my residence hall were actually reconstituted dehaydrated potatoes. No one really liked them. They did make an excellent adhesive, especially on the days when cheese had been added. My friends and I made many elaborate structures from stacks of dishes, cups, and flatware, all held together with potato glue. Rarely, we made simple molecular models from butter knives and oranges. The food service staff no doubt hated us.

I was also in a local herpetological society (the study of reptiles and amphibians) while a student. A year's free membership was awarded to the person who brought a food item to the Christmas pot-luck that "most resembled a reptile or amphibian". I won one year with a cheese log sculpted into the shape of a Wagler's Temple Viper. The scales were slivered almonds that I painted using paste food coloring. The second year, I made molds from realistic toy models of frogs and reptiles and cast them in vanilla almond bark. I was too poor to use white chocolate back then! Again, I used paste food coloring to paint the animals realistically. I still have the molds, but I have yet to realize my ambition to make an entire edible terrarium, complete with hard candy "glass".

Still in college, a friend of mine made miniature rubber band-powered crossbows as gifts one year. We used them to shoot large marshmallows at each other. When we moved out of the house we lived in, there were mummified marshmallow remains behind the furniture.

I love the panna cotta brains and the bloody ladyfingers! I'm going to have to hiint to my neighbor that her daughter needs to have a Halloween party this year. . .


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One cantaloupe is ripe and lush/Another's green, another's mush/I'd buy a lot more cantaloupe/ If I possessed a fluoroscope. Ogden Nash

#47 Carrot Top

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 06:51 AM

Pate a choux swans are pretty things, and very easy to make. And packages of food "to go" wrapped in tin foil shaped as a swan are also always enjoyed.

Two books on "playing with food" have remained on my shelves in the face of consistent and determined weeding for many years. Both by the same author, Judith Olney. "Entertainments" (foreword by George Lang :smile: ) has chapters on "Staging with an Artist's Eye"; "Dramatizing a Scene"; "Managing a Summer's Crowd"; "Seducing an Audience"; "Experimenting with Entertainment Patterns" and "Celebrating Rituals of Winter". Probably my favorite "design" from the book is that for "A Surreal Fantasy". Second to that, "A Matisse Patterned Luncheon".

Her "The Joy of Chocolate" book has more regular type of recipes but also includes fun chocolate work stuff such as chocolate cabbages and chocolate sacks filled with mousse and fruit and other similar ideas, and she makes the idea of creating these chocolate fantasies quite accessible for most home cooks.

This site, Family Fun, has a lot of "playing with food" ideas.

Do I play with my food? Not too much lately. Not enough time, and the choice between playing with food or with dangling participles has to be made. :sad: Probably the extent of the food play would be to take the biggest dollop of sour cream that I can, and watch as it lands on an excellently browned pierogi gleaming with shiny caramelized onions. That's enough fun for me. Very easy, too. :biggrin:

Edited by Carrot Top, 03 October 2006 - 07:07 AM.


#48 srhcb

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 07:42 AM

This site, Family Fun, has a lot of "playing with food" ideas.

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Hmmmmm :hmmm:

This gives me an idea. :rolleyes:

If I took small tortillas, folded them in half, cut them above the fold using the top part of my largest dog cookie cutter, and then baked them, I'd get dog shaped taco shells! :smile:

SB (might try this tonite! :biggrin: )

#49 Carrot Top

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 08:34 AM

If I took small tortillas, folded them in half, cut them above the fold using the top part of my largest dog cookie cutter, and then baked them, I'd get dog shaped taco shells!  :smile:  

SB (might try this tonite! :biggrin: )

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You give new meaning to the expression "putting on the dog", Steve.

Sounds like something children would love. Or dog-lovers!

Taco Bell should do this. :biggrin:

Edited by Carrot Top, 03 October 2006 - 08:38 AM.


#50 srhcb

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Posted 18 October 2006 - 06:14 PM

Last night I made PASTE!

My three year old Grandson likes to pull a chair up to the center island and watch me work in the kitchen, especially when the KitchenAid stand mixer is set up. Of course, when I make cake or cookies he gets to lick the beaters and bowl, but last night I was making my favorite Oatmeal Bread from the King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Cook Book.

To my surprise he not only ate the raw dough, and even stuck his fingers into the flour and licked them off. Then I remembered (way, way) back to my grade school days, and the kids who used to eat paste. (We all tried it .... right? :wacko: ) It's really nothing but flour and water!

So, looking in the KAF's index, what do I espy? In Chapter XI, "Fun!", are three recipes for paste! Using elements from two of the recipes, "Simple Paste" and "Schoolroom Paste", (the third is for Paper-Mache Paste), I whipped some up.

Then, of course, we had to cut pictures out of the Sunday paper cartoons and advertising flyers and paste them onto construction paper. We were having so much Fun! we were had to make another batch.

If you're ever so inclined, here's my recipe:


Paste

4 parts Flour
3 parts Water
a couple drops of Mint Extract

Mix ingredients together

Paste/Taste as desired :raz:

SB :laugh:

PS: The KAF Cookbook authors, obviously parents themselves, include the helpful notation, "All these pastes are completely water soluble and can be soaked off anything that has been inappropriately pasted." :smile:

#51 sazji

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 03:39 AM

Now this is how I like to play with food  :laugh: :
[wonderful anatomical food pics deleted]


This is great! Here in Turkey there are several different cookies and other foods that refer to parts of bodies. Ladies' fingers, sweethearts' lips, women's thighs (which is a kind of meatball). I've been inspired...;)

I made kittly litter cake once, years ago. I wouldn't even consider it here; people would just not be able to deal....

My favorite thing to do as a kid very interested in science and geology) was to make "mashed potato volcanoes." I'd stuck a big blob of margarine into my heap of instant mashed potatoes (hey, this was 1968 suburban Iowa City), cover them, form it into a "volcano" shape, make a hole in the top, and press on the side to make it "erupt." Mom didn't bother me too much about it.

Here there is a packaged cookie, called "Tutku," which has a chocolate, lemon or coffee cream filling. It's sort of surrounded by a thin sugar shell. I sometimes find myself carefully eating the cookie from the edges, then over the top, trying to get down to the filling without breaking the shell. I'm not generally successful. But trying's fun.

I remember making a Halloween dinner with a friend once, where we colored all the foods in a disgusting way. "Flesh tone" mashed potaoes with deep red colored chicken gravy, pork chops marinated in very little water an a lot of blue food coloring, greenish blue bread (we wanted to conjure up the image of mold, but it didn't quite work), and dark gray-and-dingy-yellow vanilla pudding with a bit of gray purple whipped cream on the top (we separated a little after it thickened to have two different colors, then swirled them a bit). We also tried soaking corn on the cob in red water, but it didn't work. It was not pretty.

A blue chicken stew with separately cooked green and orange potatoes might be fun. (I suppose I could just use carrots...but they would take the blue...)

When I was a kid, there was nothing I liked better than drinking blue milk. My mom was indulgent. :)
"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."
-Lea de Laria

#52 Peter Green

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 03:56 AM

Sticky rice. There is almost nothing the imaginative family cannot create with enough khao niao.....plus, the faux snowball fights are great!

#53 Peter Green

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Posted 19 October 2006 - 03:59 AM

Oh, I almost forgot.

I used to work in a Vietnamese cafe, and dessert was the stereotypical fried bananas with ice cream. One time our high school teacher came in with a hot date. We sent the dessert out without slicing the banana, and tactically located both scoops of vanilla at the base.

And I wonder why I had to work so hard for my marks?

#54 Reefpimp

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Posted 31 October 2006 - 12:48 AM

Oh, I almost forgot.

I used to work in a Vietnamese cafe, and dessert was the stereotypical fried bananas with ice cream.  One time our high school teacher came in with a hot date.  We sent the dessert out without slicing the banana, and tactically located both scoops of vanilla at the base.

And I wonder why I had to work so hard for my marks?

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I've done the same presentation with sammich wraps, with scoops of rice covered in lettuce chiff on each side of it at one end, and sour cream strategically trailed down the other side of the plate.... Staff meals only, but oh what fun.


This whole love/hate thing would be a lot easier if it was just hate.

Bring me your finest food, stuffed with your second finest!

#55 eJulia

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 09:02 PM

My mother used to make a "Cranberry Platter" for Thanksgiving... two cans of Ocean Spray whole cranberry sauce, two cans of jellied cranberry sauce - sliced, arranged down the middle.

Brother and I would take a slice of said cranberry "jello", then meet eyes across the table....

First player would section off as large a piece as they thought they could handle - usually a quarter slice (first round) - then he'd swallow it whole. No chewing, no mouth manipulation, no smooshing. Whole, one gulp.

Opposing gamester would then take an even bigger "chunk", and show their ability by swallowing WHOLE an even larger chunk.

Game would continue until either Mom caught on and kicked our butts, or one of us chocked or puked. (The one that did... they lost.)

I still try it when I'm alone.... :rolleyes:

Now I win every time!
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#56 Sonia

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 02:43 PM

Back in east texas a long time ago we mixed cocoa and sugar and scooped it into our lower lip and played like it was snuff !! We didn't spit though, we swallowed.

#57 Mooshmouse

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 02:41 AM

Without question, I'd have to say the Tim Tam Slam!
Joie Alvaro Kent
"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

#58 mizducky

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 03:22 AM

Hmm. Wonder if those Girl Scout Thin Mint cookies are too dense to do that trick with. :smile:

#59 Mooshmouse

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 03:51 AM

Hmm. Wonder if those Girl Scout Thin Mint cookies are too dense to do that trick with. :smile:

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Oooh, mizducky, please be sure to report back if you do any reconnaissance!
Joie Alvaro Kent
"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

#60 sparrowgrass

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 06:42 AM

Not something you would want to eat plain, but cornstarch mixed with water has some amazing properties.

Use just enough water to moisten the starch. If you squeeze it up in your hands, it is a solid, and you can toss a ball of it from hand to hand. If you just let it sit, it liquifies and runs thru your fingers.

Kids love it. Easy clean-up, too, because when the water evaporates, the corn starch can be vaccuumed up.

Colloidal something or another, it is called.

Edited by sparrowgrass, 20 November 2006 - 06:43 AM.

sparrowgrass