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eG Foodblog: Fat Guy - A Normal Week

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#91 Fat Guy

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 09:22 PM

PJ decided to do us the favor of getting up extra-early this morning, so we figured we’d go to the beach and try to tire him out. This was his first experience of actually crawling in sand, as opposed to being carried in the backpack.

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There was a loose plan in place to make lobster bisque for lunch, using the leftover carcasses from our lobster dinner the other night, however my sister and I decided we couldn’t wait any longer. So she made us “lobster scrambled eggs” for breakfast. We were lucky in that the guests the other night were not particularly resourceful or motivated lobster eaters, so there was a total of maybe a pound of meat still left on the lobsters.

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Basically, the improvised lobster scrambled eggs started as heavily reduced lobster bisque. Then my sister cooled the bisque and added some eggs. I was an observer, rather than a participant in the cooking, though I was occasionally consulted. I made the mistake of telling my sister I planned to be an observer, so of course she kept addressing me as “Mr. UN Observer” and may never stop

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Then she added butter that she cleverly kept from last night’s dinner to a skillet and poured in the bisque and egg mixture.

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She let them set a bit, then gently stirred.

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There wasn’t any good bread in the house, but there was a big box of Saltines, so the lobster scrambled eggs were served with Saltines and, on the side, a little cup of lobster bisque that functioned as sort of a sauce. This was probably the best thing I’ve eaten on this vacation, if not in my entire life.

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For lunch we went to Mac’s down on the pier. The place was seriously crowded but, surprisingly, the prices were lower than what seems to be the Cape average, the ingredients were super-high quality (the Mac’s people also own a seafood market), and the atmosphere felt very genuine old-school Cape. There was all sorts of fried stuff served, and we decided Mac’s onion rings were arguably better even than the ones at Arnold’s. I had a fried cod sandwich, in addition to tasting other stuff. Ellen had a grilled tuna filet sandwich, which was really nice. We ate outside at the picnic tables, which of all the picnic tables we’ve encountered on the Cape are by far the most uncomfortable.

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My cod sandwich.

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We also ran into some of my sister’s friends, who shared our uncomfortable picnic table with us. They had baked a loaf of banana bread, but I guess their kitchen was as poorly provisioned as ours because they didn’t have enough bananas for the recipe so they supplemented with plums and nectarines. The bread was described to us as “plummy nectarine-y banana bread,” and a discussion of how to spell “nectarine-y” ensued (my sister and brother-in-law are both newspaper editors). It was great. Later we gave them three nearly rotten bananas from our kitchen so they could make another loaf of banana bread, this time with just bananas and no plums or nectarines – though I can’t imagine that would represent an improvement.

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For dinner, we returned to Bob’s Sub & Cone. Please don’t tell Bob, but Bob’s Sub & Cone was not our first choice. First, we went to the Beachcomber restaurant, which as the name suggests is at the beach, but I assigned no credibility to the claim that our wait for a table would only be “25 to 35 minutes.” There were a zillion people there and the hostess who gave us the information didn’t seem to have a clue. So, we decided instead to go to Moby Dick’s out on Route 6, pretty near to PJ’s. Mind you, at each step of the expedition, my nephews were saying, “Why aren’t we going to Bob’s Sub & Cone? It’s the best restaurant,” and singing the Bob’s Sub & Cone song. When we saw the parking lot at Moby Dick’s, which was totally overpopulated, we drove right on by and headed down Route 6 to Bob’s Sub & Cone.

The amazing thing is that the food at Bob’s Sub & Cone is just as good as at the other good places on Route 6, but because it’s a couple of miles farther out from Wellfleet it doesn’t get nearly as busy as Moby Dick’s, PJ’s, et al. We had virtually no wait (one family ahead of us on line at the ordering window) and were able to claim two picnic tables and a high chair.

In addition to having all the same fried seafood stuff as all the other places on Route 6, Bob’s Sub & Cone has an extensive subs menu. I felt I should try one, since last night I’d had a cone – shouldn’t I have a sub tonight? So I got a sausage sub, and it was pretty damn good. Also excellent were the onion rings. The broiled cod sandwich was a surprise highlight – it’s not actually listed as such on the menu board but we got the 411 that it was available. Cape Cod has got to be the best place in the world for onion rings. I mean, maybe there’s one place somewhere that serves better onion rings, but surely there is no region that has more examples of excellent onion rings.

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At Bob’s Sub & Cone, you order cones (and other ice cream items) from the outside windows, but you order savory food from a counter indoors. Behind the counter, we noticed a pass-through to the kitchen, and a guy toiling at the stoves. “Is that Bob?” I asked the young lady at the cash register. “Yes, it is,” she replied. My nephews were very excited about this piece of information. I later mentioned to her that my nephews really worship Bob, and she said, “Oh, you better tell Bob.” So I yelled the information back to Bob in the kitchen and he kind of nodded. Luckily, I went to college in New England, so I understand about the whole “man of few words” New England non-speaking style (kind of like how Japanese people understand the subtleties of bowing) and can interpret these nods properly. I could tell Bob was pleased with the information.

Because I made so many trips back to the counter to get trays, condiments, etc. (apparently nobody else in my family was available to help with these tasks), I had several opportunities to communicate with Bob. At one point, when the cashier was off doing something, I approached and Bob came out. “What’re you missing?” he asked. We needed a large lemonade, so he poured it and walked away. My nephew was particularly excited to learn that his lemonade had been poured by Bob’s own hand. He wouldn’t let anyone else touch it, and expressed regret that Bob hadn’t signed the cup or at least the lid.

At the end of the meal, I saw Bob inside at a table talking to what must have been his family. He waved. We decided there was no way we were leaving without a photo of Bob. There was some question whether Bob would stand for it, but Bob totally exceeded our expectations and turned out to be a real ham. He even posed with PJ.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#92 snowangel

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 10:27 PM

Damn, Steven. I needed to see this meal you had at Bob's. We had every hopes of getting to the great and wonderful Minnesota State Fair today to consume copious and obscene amounts of fried food, but the weather and a network problem at Paul's office prevented it, so Monday it will be.

But, darn it, your comment about the onion rings. I haven't managed to find a noteworthy onion ring in this fair state. I guess that's my mission this fall. To visit any and everywhere and search for a good ring. An almost perfect food when done right, IMHO.
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#93 srhcb

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 04:51 AM

I like guys like Bob.

#94 Champagne Sadie

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 05:03 AM

That is an amazing amount of food to consume in 4 days - I can't imagine the calories and saturated fat. :blink:

Looks fun though. :biggrin:

#95 Shaya

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:19 AM

Steven, thanks so much for being so generous with your time this week. My family spent a few weeks on the Cape when I was around 9, and I remember the meals like they were yesterday - the lobster, the fries, the ocean. This is a pretty decadent week of eating you are having, it really has the consummate essence of a summertime beach vacation.

I also love what you and your wife are doing in exposing PJ to restaurants and being comfortable in different environments. It's something we've done with our boys (now 3 and 5) since they were born (I can remember carefully slurping Korean soup and Thai noodles over their tiny heads as they always seemed to need to nurse just as the food arrived :wacko: ). And I think it has been a success, as we feel comfortable that we can take them to many types of restaurants and they will behave quite well. They key is, though, that the menu be of interest to them. The more engaged they can be in the meal, it seems, the less restless they become.

Just to drive home how adorable PJ is, my older guy saw the photo of PJ at the beach up on my computer screen this morning and immediately started calling his little brother, "Come here, you have to see this, it's so cute, come and see..." Priceless.

#96 Fat Guy

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:28 AM

That is an amazing amount of food to consume in 4 days - I can't imagine the calories and saturated fat.  :blink:

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This is a pretty decadent week of eating you are having....

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Oh, you must be assuming we don't always eat this way!

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#97 Varmint

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:38 AM

I've spent some time with Steven and Ellen. Steven manages to consume a few calories when on the road. Or at home. Or in a boat. Or with a goat. Or in a box. Or with a fox.

Ellen, on the other hand, manages to look like she's eating a ton of everything, but she's sly in her ways. Her physique don't lie!
Dean McCord
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#98 Fat Guy

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:40 AM

Especially with a goat.

And for the record my physique don't lie either.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#99 Saucy Girl

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:56 AM

Will you get to go back to the Beachcomber? That is a fun place. I haven't been for about 8 yrs, but the last time we were there, we ate dinner and stayed to hear the live music afterwards....I remember the food being good, typical, Cape Cod fare.

Fat Guy wrote:
For dinner, we returned to Bob’s Sub & Cone. Please don’t tell Bob, but Bob’s Sub & Cone was not our first choice. First, we went to the Beachcomber restaurant, which as the name suggests is at the beach, but I assigned no credibility to the claim that our wait for a table would only be “25 to 35 minutes.” There were a zillion people there and the hostess who gave us the information didn’t seem to have a clue.

#100 Fat Guy

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 08:53 PM

The week has been such a whirlwind of activity that I never even paused to consider how great the weather had been all week. Sunny and warm during the day; cool and breezy at night – it’s the kind of weather that makes one consider going to college in New England. Today, however, the weather was much more authentically New England-ish: rainy, damp and cold. We caught the last bits of sunlight on our morning walk on the beach, and got back in the car just as the storm clouds rolled in and started dumping rain.

At the beach, the tide was low so several sandbars popped up. Momo, I hasten to add, fierce though he may look, is terrified of water. Nonetheless, Ellen was able to drag him out to a sandbar. Once on the sandbar, he considered escape, but that would have required getting his feet wet again. Eventually he made his peace with being on the sandbar, and he ran around while PJ had a good crawl.

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As a breakfast snack, I had a cup of steaming hot leftover lobster bisque.

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We traveled back to Orleans at brunchtime, this time to the actual town of Orleans as opposed to the strip area where the Stop and Shop is. (Although, we did make it back to the Christmas Tree Shops on the way out of town, where we got, for $1.99 a box, better and more saltwater taffy than you get for $7 at the ripoff places in Provincetown, and also some nice jam made by Trappist monks.) Orleans is great – I think were I to have a Cape Cod vacation home, I’d want it to be in Orleans. Not that I’d ever want a vacation home anywhere, even if I could afford one and even if I had the patience to deal with all the headaches of maintaining a vacation home. I much prefer short visits to other people’s vacation homes.

We had brunch at Sparrow’s (the full and correct name of the place is the Hot Chocolate Sparrow, but people just call it Sparrow’s), which was a change of pace from the steady diet of fried seafood, subs and cones of the past few days. Sparrow’s serves actual food. It’s mostly a dessert and coffee place, with a small menu of high-quality panini and breakfast sandwiches. Ellen had a turkey, roasted red pepper and pesto panini (or whatever the singular of panini is); I had a ham, egg and cheese sandwich (the signage was emphatic on the point that the eggs were free range – perhaps that gives a sense of the style of the place); and PJ had bits and pieces of everything – he particularly enjoyed a piece of the bread with pesto on it. We also had a cranberry scone and a piece of crumb cake. Everything was good, but the panini and the scone really stood out. Oh, the place has pretty good coffee.

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My sister made dinner tonight. The original plan was for linguine with clams, and that did happen, but the menu somehow proliferated to include lobsters, corn, steamers, Caesar salad, pizza and other stuff, and also four guests (my brother-in-law’s cousin, wife and two kids). Actually, the original plan was to grill outside, but the meteorological situation made that impossible, which turned out to be a nice piece of culinary luck because the dinner we had was better than what we would have grilled.

My sister’s method for linguine with clams is highly effective: a box of linguine cooked very al dente (because it will cook more and absorb the sauce) and drained, tossed in a pot with a generous amount of olive oil and a stick of butter, very little garlic, oregano, a jar of clam juice, a cup of wine, some grated parmesan and a lot of pepper. Then add about 30 steamed clams, some shucked and some left whole, a ton of parsley, and more parmesan and pepper at the end. Tonight’s preparation was a double recipe.

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(Rookie’s pizza in Wellfleet is, by the way, not nearly as good as George’s pizza in Provincetown. Which is not to say that George’s is all that good either.)

My sister insisted that I transcribe the following quote from her: “My life’s ambition is to have a recipe on my brother’s website. Now I’ve achieved it, and there’s nowhere to go but down.”

A terminology note there: Everyone in my family insists on referring to the eGullet Society as my website, as in “How’s your website? Does it make any money?” no matter how many times I explain that the eGullet Society is not a website but is, rather, a not-for-profit public charity for which I work, alongside a staff of volunteers from around the world, in which I have no ownership interest of any kind, that among other things (like the eG Scholarships program) offers several web services like eG Forums, the eGullet Culinary Institute, the Daily Gullet, eG Spotlight Conversations, etc. They actually get annoyed if I try to explain this, like it’s a problem I have.

Also as part of the dinner event, I made vodka gimlets, which are the only cocktails I know how to make that Ellen likes. I’m a partisan of gimlets made with a combination of fresh lime juice and Rose’s lime juice. Without the Rose’s, it’s just not a gimlet, but with only Rose’s it lacks freshness.

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We capped off the evening with ice cream from Mac’s. I confess, the mint chocolate chip ice cream at Mac’s is extraordinary, because the chips are like little mini versions of Andes mints – you know, with the chocolate on one side and mint goo on the other. I don’t suppose Mac’s makes its own ice cream, but whichever supplier they chose, they chose well.

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Tomorrow will be a travel day for us: extremely early departure from the Cape (Saturday is the day most rental houses turn over, so you’ve got to leave early to beat the traffic), a visit with the inlaws in New Haven, CT, and then back to New York City. I’ll post a wrap-up late tomorrow night or early the following morning.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#101 racheld

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 09:21 PM

You may be right. Cape Cod just may be the onion ring Mecca of the world.
And the best rings of all time have to be these:

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They are not just rings, but strips and shreds and long curling loops of crackly-sheathed onion. And I don't think there's a ring on that plate---it's a continuous Moebius puzzle of one infinitely unscrolling, crisp-coated, golden, unforgettably perfect example of the fryer's art. No beginning and no end in sight.

What if the apple in Eden had been an onion. . .
Fairy tea has its own magic, for it never does run out;
And the flavour you imagine will come streaming from the spout.
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#102 Pan

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 09:32 PM

Fat Guy, the singular of panini is panino.

Blog on.

#103 Fat Guy

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 02:02 AM

a continuous Moebius puzzle of one infinitely unscrolling, crisp-coated, golden, unforgettably perfect example of the fryer's art. No beginning and no end in sight.

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That was actually our second choice for the eGullet Society slogan. Sometimes I regret that we didn't go with it.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#104 johnnyd

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 06:10 AM

Great storytelling FG. The Bob's Sub & Cone episode was heroic. And this nugget:

My sister insisted that I transcribe the following quote from her: “My life’s ambition is to have a recipe on my brother’s website. Now I’ve achieved it, and there’s nowhere to go but down.”

:laugh: Sounds a lot like my crew.
"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

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#105 Josefinajoisey

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 02:33 PM

Dayummmm....great blog, great timing (we were at the Cape the same week), great memories. Brought back great memories of when we would bring my son to the Cape (now he's a hulking hs sophomore). We had the dog this trip, too. Cape real estate rental offerings are not very pet friendly...we've had good luck with Internet rental sites.
Did you find the Cottage Bakery in Orleans? Fantastic 'dirt bombs' (muffins/doughnuts)

Welcome home...I'm still trying to hang on to my vacation 'buzz'!

#106 Fat Guy

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 08:29 AM

There are limits to what the human mind and body can endure, and I’m sure you’ll agree we exceeded those limits yesterday. We started at 4:30am, so we could get showered and mostly packed before waking PJ up, addressing his morning needs, doing the rest of the packing and hitting the road. (It wasn’t possible to do all the packing the night before – there were too many dependencies with respect to baby stuff we’d need in the morning, refrigerated stuff, bags that couldn’t be closed until one last thing was added, etc.)

We made it as far as the Fairhaven, MA, exit before PJ needed further attention, so we pulled off and, lo and behold, there was the Fairhaven Wal-Mart. This was not one of the nicer Wal-Marts (Fairhaven and the surrounding areas – New Bedford, Fall River – seem pretty depressed) but it did have a little cafeteria area in which to feed PJ. At this point it was 9-something in the morning and we already felt ready to drop dead. PJ found it all highly entertaining, though.

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The one bummer about the Fairhaven exit was that there weren’t any decent coffee and doughnut places, and in our emotional state at the time this was a major issue for us. We got back on the highway feeling defeated, however at the very next exit, New Bedford (pronounced “New Bed-faahd” if you’re actually from there), there was a sign for a Dunkin’ Donuts so we figured that would do. Then, a pleasant surprise ensued: Ellen spied, right across the street from the Dunkin’ Donuts, a totally crummy looking place called Honey Dew, which seemed to be the equivalent of Dunkin’ Donuts but indigenous to the region, and had a lot more cars in its parking lot. Also, right up the street from the Honey Dew was a Shell station with gas for $2.80 a gallon – unheard of in this part of the country right now (it was well over $3 everywhere else we got gas on this trip). Honey Dew did not disappoint. Not only were the accents of the cashiers amazingly genuine “Can aah help who’s next he-ah!” but also the doughnuts were superb. I tried a few items, the best of which was the “honey dip stick,” kind of like a glazed cruller but not twisted. I took a photo of it resting on my leg as Ellen drove.

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We made it to New Haven, CT, around lunchtime and, after visiting an ailing relative, we went to Ellen’s parents’ house for a light lunch. The basil, tomatoes and cucumbers were coming in, and Ellen’s mother procured some fresh local corn, so we had salad, corn and some leftover Sally’s pizza from the night before (Sally’s is not open for lunch).

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We left New Haven around 3pm and got back to Manhattan around 5pm. It took a solid half hour to unload the car, which gave us 30 minutes to get cleaned up and changed for the evening’s event.

The evening’s event? Yes, you are now basically at the half-way point of our day yesterday. We still had a party to go to in Quogue.

Those of you familiar with New York geography will probably have dropped something or spit milk out your noses by now. For those of you who aren’t, Quogue is a beach community and barrier island way out on the South shore of Long Island. It’s part of the area known as the Hamptons, and many people will tell you that Quogue (pronounced “Qwog”) is the nicest part of the Hamptons. Anyway, Quogue is really nice, but it takes about two hours to drive there from Manhattan, even though everybody in Quogue has collectively agreed to lie and say it’s “Only 90 minutes from Manhattan!”

We rallied for this expedition, however, because my friend Shelley Clark, who is one of the premier publicists in the hospitality industry, told us this was to be the event of the summer, and when Shelley says something is to be the event of the summer, it will be.

Maybe it wasn’t the event of the summer. It felt more like the event of the century thus far. The primary purpose of the event was that it was an “awareness raiser” (which is kind of like a fundraiser without the overt fundraising pitches) for the Miami-based Diabetes Research Institute, hosted at the oceanfront home (more like an ocean liner on land, but still technically a home) of Jill and Cliff Viner. A secondary purpose of the event – the reason it was of interest to food media – was to showcase the Barton G. events company and its new chef Richard Blais.

Some of you might remember Richard Blais, who was until recently the Atlanta equivalent of avant-garde chefs Grant Achatz, Wylie Dufresne, et al. Barton G., one of the top event caterers in the world (owned by former figure skater Barton G. Weiss), has just recruited Blais (and his wife) and moved them down to Miami. Barton G. and Blais were at the event, and the food situation was totally out of control, over the top, decadent and unusual – I kept thinking it was like Ferran Adria’s bar mitzvah.

There were a number of food stations, some of which were showcasing “molecular gastronomy” and others of which were just serving really good normal food. Blais and his wife were handling the “liquid nitrogen martini bar” and a station serving transglutimate noodles in three varieties. The liquid nitrogen martinis and cocktails were centered around little steaming white cylinders of frozen vodka (yes, you can freeze Vodka solid – if you happen to have a 400-pound tank of liquid nitrogen at your disposal). The vodka would slowly melt into the cocktail, making it stronger as it would melt – just the opposite of how melting ice normally affects a cocktail. Blais’s lovely wife patiently demonstrated the creation of one of these cocktails, while I photographed it badly.

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This is the noodle station. The noodles were made from proteins like shrimp and chicken, not from grain. The shrimp ones were particularly tasty.

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The thing that was so neat, and amusing, about these stations was that you see similar food plated preciously at the high-end avant-garde restaurants, but here they were doing it for 300+ people in a buffet format, like, no big deal, this is just the food we’re serving today. It was really incongruous and wonderful, and maybe even a sign of things to come.

As I mentioned, there was also regular food, which was great too. Most noteworthy was the shellfish bar, where they took giant shrimp, lobster tails, king crab and blue crab and built seafood cocktails to order, with a choice of sauces. The display was overwhelmingly abundant, and so were the portions. I don’t often max out on shellfish. This may even have been the first time. There were several other stations, but another worth mentioning was the meat station, where they were grilling lamb chops, beef tenderloins and other stuff – you just walked up, asked for whatever you wanted, and they sliced it to order and gave you twice as much as you’d asked for.

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There was also the matter of dessert. After the assembled guests had gorged themselves on the savory cuisine, we all went downstairs to the dessert bar, which featured made-to-order liquid nitrogen ice creams and sorbets in flavors like black olive (and also in more familiar flavors), cotton candy and about a million pastries of all kinds. Here’s Blais in front of the liquid nitrogen ice cream window.

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What did all this have to do with diabetes? Well, all of this food, delicious as it was, was also part of a nutritional demonstration. All of the savory food was low-carb, and all the desserts were – get this – sugar free. Blais and I tasted and retasted the ice creams and sorbets together, discussed the matter and agreed that there was no way either of us could tell they were made with a sugar substitute (they were using a variant of Splenda). With most of the other desserts, we could detect differences – sometimes in texture, sometimes there was an aftertaste – but the stuff was still damn impressive. The moral of the story being that if Richard Blais, his wife, his pastry chef and Barton G. do all the cooking around your house you don’t really have to make any sacrifices, even if you have diabetes. Well, maybe the moral is something else. This is a copy of the planned menu, which is fairly accurate though there were a few last-minute changes. Close enough, though.

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The final event of the evening – I know, it never ends – was a rousing, heartfelt, intimate performance by the great Patti LaBelle, who has been living with diabetes for a decade, on a specially constructed stage over the pool.

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Then we had to drive home. My mother had been babysitting PJ and Momo, so I put her in a cab back to her apartment on the Upper West Side, took Momo out and collapsed in bed – I didn’t even have the strength to take my socks off.

So, that’s it for my foodblog this week. Thanks, everyone, for reading along, and thanks to Susan in FL and the eG Foodblogs team for making it happen!

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#107 Susan in FL

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 08:35 AM

I'm sorry for the period of time that this topic was mistakenly closed! Please feel free to post ending questions and comments through tomorrow.
Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

#108 dockhl

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 09:02 AM

FG~

All I can say is WOW........from start to finish, everyhting from the food to your endurance ! Great blog.

And what an amazing bash to end it with........

#109 Rebecca263

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 09:27 AM

This is the first time in many a moon that I have missed my old life as a denizen of the Miami Beach social scene. BartonG parties RULE!
Thanks, for your amazing blog. I enjoyed your vacation immensely, it brought back happy memories of our trips wth Kiddle at that age. I've spent hours reminiscing about great summers past since seeing your photos and reading your posts this week. I think that you and Ellen and PJ make a great combo, charm, charm and charm!
Be well, and enjoy every moment!
Again, THANK YOU! :smile:
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#110 MarketStEl

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 11:45 AM

So...an ordinary week with an extraordinary finish!

I imagine you're still saddle sore from all that driving yesterday.

Great blog--it's given me a powerful hankerin' for a fried seafood platter. That picture-perfect platter you had is etched in my memory. Thanks for taking us along for the ride.
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
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#111 ludja

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 12:25 PM

Thanks for a great blog, Fat Guy!

Like a few others, it brought back wonderful memories of family vacations on the Cape. We used to rent cottages in the Wellfleet/Eastham/Truro area so you went to many of the same places and beaches as we did.

A well-rested baby is a happy baby and it seems like PJ had a great trip as well. I love the ice cream photo--the rapt expression on his face and knowing it was his first ice craem cone was just priceless.

Talk about finishing a blog with a bang as well!

Thanks for sharing a 'typical' week with us!
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#112 KatieLoeb

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 12:46 PM

Great blog, FG! Thanks for sharing everything with us, from the mundane to the spectacular. Lots of photos of PJ and Momo were an added bonus, but the end of week Diabetes bash was off the hook! Wow!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
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#113 racheld

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 02:02 PM

It's been a wonderful week, with all the traveling and beaching and ordering of all things from the sea and deep-fryer. And your family!! Traveling with a little one is a thing apart, and I admire all of you young folks who undertake such a pack-a-lot, stop-a-lot, can't-stop-there task.

I loved the views of Cape Cod---I think you CAN be homesick for somewhere you've never been. Your PJ is quite a trouper, entering into the spirit of everything with equal aplomb and delight--to whom wet sand is Disneyland and a Wal-Mart basket the Magic Teapot ride.

And MoMo---he's reminded me all week of my Grand-Dogs, both big ole Georgia boys, and both sweet and loyal friends. Thanks for letting us tag along on your travels.

You and Ellen are both very lucky.
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#114 Anna N

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 02:40 PM

Enjoyed every word and photo of your blog, Steven.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#115 johnnyd

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 03:15 PM

Outstanding party! What a finale to a week away. Killer BartonG menu, I must say. I'm still wraping my brain around the fact that a drink is getting stronger as the "ice" melts. :cool: Thank you FG! As the first-ever foodblogger on eGullet (what was that one? three days? one and a half pages? no photos??) this was a classic edition.
Cheers
"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

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#116 Kouign Aman

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 05:19 PM

A crawling, chowing-down baby, a dog and fried food. It was wonderful. The party at the end was the contrasting crunch of the nuts on the top of the banana split.
Thanks for blogging. Happy 1 year of parenthood.
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#117 little ms foodie

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 05:24 PM

Wow! that was fun! I've never been to the Cape and thought everything was very interesting. Love the family interactions and photos- well done!! thank you!

#118 christine007

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 06:04 PM

Thanks for this wonderful blog. Onion rings are a thing that is dear to my heart, and I loved hearing your opinions about the ones you had!
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#119 Pan

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 06:29 PM

The photos of that Diabetes Foundation event were a first for eGullet! What an extraordinary event! Thanks for sharing some of an event such as we ordinary food-lovers will never see.

#120 judiu

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 06:52 PM

The photos of that Diabetes Foundation event were a first for eGullet! What an extraordinary event! Thanks for sharing some of an event such as we ordinary food-lovers will never see.

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What he said and more! WOW, whatta trip! Thanks, F.G. and family, for a wonderful blog. :wub:
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