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Rose Gelato


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14 replies to this topic

#1 jbehmoaras

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 05:42 AM

I wanted your input on this recipe for rose gelato I'm came up with while at work today. My goal is for it do be a dense and scoopable ice cream that is sweet but no overwhelmingly sweet.

2c milk
1/2c sugar
1/4c white corn syrup
4 egg yolks
-- rose water
maybe 1 tsp xanthan gum
1/2 cup of evaporated milk

Put together the milk, half the sugar, and the corn syrup, heat until first bubbles come. Meanwhile whisk the yolks untill ribbon stage with the rest of the sugar. Temper with the milk and slowly incorporate. Heat untill it coats the back of a wooden spoon. Then and the evaporated milk and the gum and add enough rose water untill it tastes like you just put in a tad too much. Cool down mixture in the fridge overnight and put it in the ice cream maker
Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#2 K8memphis

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:14 AM

That sounds everlastingly appealing...wonder if I can find all the parts to the ice cream maker...

Thanks for posting!

#3 jbehmoaras

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:59 AM

I wanted to add a disclaimer ... I havent tested this out yet so I'm not sure how the proportions are going to work out.

The only thing that will really be questionable is the amount of evaporated milk and xanthan gum as I dont use these as much. And I dont know if four eggs will be too overwheling to allow the rose water to come through.
Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#4 Lee Ratliff

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 08:40 AM

You might also try infusing the milk with fresh, fragrant rose petals instead of using rose water. Also, candied rose petals added in the last few seconds of freezing might add interesting visual and textural appeal. Or candied petals as garnish. I have a recipe for homemade candied petals if you're interested.

Personally, I'd delete the egg yolks or at least reduce to a single yolk. One yolk per quart of mix (or even less) is sufficient to get the benefit of creamy texture without a noticeable taste. The rich taste of multiple egg yolks works with some flavors, but might clash with rose?

I've never used Xanthan gum, but one of my ice cream books says it gives ice cream a 'slimy texture'. I've had good luck with old fashioned arrow root, but I'm still experimenting with stabilizers. Their benefit is not always obvious to me and sometimes they have an adverse effect on texture and melting characteristics.

Let us know how it turns out!

#5 jbehmoaras

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:30 AM

Good idea regarding the amount of eggs ... about using rose petals, the problem is i dont know where i could find any edible rose flowers right away as i was planning on making the ice cream tonight
Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#6 tan319

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:33 AM

Be careful of the Rose water.
When you get to where it's just a bit underflavored add a pinch ( good sized) of salt then adjust.
Also, letting your mix rest overnight will let you test how much the rose effect is coming thru.
I did a milk chocolate rosewater creme brulee awhile back and went just a bit past what i would consider ok on the rose.
I also concur about the egg yolks.
It neuters your flavor a bit, beware..
Do you have an outline for the Xanthan gum addition?
Any stabilizer will "slime up" your ice cream if you use too much.
Maybe you can look up pastry suppliers or if you are working in a restaurant ask your purveyor.
I use Cremoden.
Good Luck!
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#7 jbehmoaras

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:39 AM

I really dont want the xanthan gum to have too much of an effect on the texture, I want to use it more for its ability to prevent too many ice crystals from forming and maybe enhance scoopability
Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#8 gingersweetiepie

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 01:28 PM

Try adding the rosewater to the cooled base, not before.

There are also rose preserves, which should result in a smoother product because of the natural invert sugar. I just finished a new dish on my menu which uses them in a strawberry rose sorbet and I must say it's one of the few things I've ever been truly satisfied with.

It's always good to use a light hand when it comes to flowers in food. You mentioned adding a tad more than you think you need, which is the right idea since this is a frozen product. But if this is a gelato that you serve very soft at a warmer temp than custard ice cream, just enough may be just enough.

#9 jbehmoaras

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 02:04 PM

Thanks for that tip regarding not adding too much rose water ... This does make sense as it is a suprisingly potent flavor.

I do have some rose preserves from turkey that my grandmother made for me so i could use that ... Maybe I'll use that instead of half of the sugar because I would like to have some sugar in there because i have heard that the more types of sugar you can mix together, the better your texture will be (or something remotely along those lines)
Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#10 tan319

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 04:26 PM

Good tips about the adding after.
In the book "The Way To Cook" ,Pierre Herme suggests using rose preserves also.
The tip about going lighter rather then heavier concerning flowers in general is true.
Lavender is cool but just a tad too much throws it into soapland!
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#11 gingersweetiepie

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:23 PM

Thanks for that tip regarding not adding too much rose water ... This does make sense as it is a suprisingly potent flavor.

I do have some rose preserves from turkey that my grandmother made for me so i could use that ... Maybe I'll use that instead of half of the sugar because I would like to have some sugar in there because i have heard that the more types of sugar you can mix together, the better your texture will be (or something remotely along those lines)

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homemade rose preserves from turkey! made by a grandma, too. sounds so romantic and exotic and comforting all at once. would you consider trading? i could make you a hudson valley gooseberry jam, perhaps?

and let us know how it works out.

#12 jbehmoaras

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 06:51 PM

Well I'm going back to turkey this summer so I'll see if I can get a hold of some more ... In the meantime I tried the recipe making a couple substitutions from the original.

I used 1/4 cup less sugar and replaced it with 1/4 of the preserves, used only one yolk and used only 1/4 tsp of xanthan ... The problem is once I combined everything, it came out to be extremely sweet.

Wo I added 1.5 more cups of milk 1 cup of condensed milk, and a little more rose water to compensate for the dilution and then I ran it through my ice cream machine but unfortunately it turned out kind of icey ...

Any suggestions on making it smoother.
Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#13 tan319

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 09:19 PM

make the recipe first, using the full tsp of Xanthan ( usually added to a bit of sugar kept out, to lighten the eggs with.)
Make the recipe first then see what you like/dislike about it.
Next time you use the preserves, strain them out.
You can (digressing again, sorry) use half and half or Heavy cream for half the milk for more fat, creaminess, etc.
This is why many use dry matter, such as dry milk in their formulas, to combat iciness, less water, etc.
better Luck next time!
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#14 jbehmoaras

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 09:39 AM

So I tried a couple different variations on the proportion of the ingredients and I have come to the conclusion that it is very difficult to get a clean rose flavor with dairy, even without eggs or cream ... So I tried to make a sorbet.

I used 1cup water 1/2c sugar and 1/4 c corn syrup, 1/8 tsp xantum gum and 1/4 tsp rose water. This was obviously a small batch but i was in the testing stages and I didnt include the rose preserves because the truth is that my jam is vary sweet and doesnt allow me to add enough other sugars to achieve the consistency Im looking for. This sobet doesnt harden enough in my opinion so I'll probably have to jack up the water content along with the rose water which i couldnt taste much either.

P.S. I think the evaporated milk is what threw off the flavor as I tasted it from the can and it is very similar to the flavor that I think was getting in the way.

Edited by jbehmoaras, 31 July 2006 - 09:41 AM.

Jeremy Behmoaras

Cornell School for Hotel Administration Class '09

#15 Lee Ratliff

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 10:17 AM

I think sorbet is a good idea, though I think a gelato could work too if it's not rich. Evaporated milk always has a little cooked caramel flavor from the canning process. I stay away from canned milk unless I'm making dulce de leche. Milk powder works better if you're looking for more solids.

If it's freezing too soft, I bet it's because you have too much invert sugar. I'd replace a 1/8 cup of corn syrup with the same amount of sugar.

I have some recipes for rose sorbet and gelato. I can fax them if you'll PM your fax number. I haven't tried them, so I don't know if they work.