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Yeasted Bread

Bread

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39 replies to this topic

#31 Beanie

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 08:08 AM

I've taken to using water, not oil. I dip my hands in water each time I handle the dough and nothing sticks. Dip a utensil in water, ditto.

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I use water too and find that it works as well or better than oil. I don't form the dough into a ball during the 10 second knead stage, just knead quickly in a bowl or container and leave it as. The folding phase comes later and by then the dough has firmed up a bit. Dip hands in water and stretch/fold the dough. I don't recall if I've done this with 70% dough (it's been awhile), but I think so.
Ilene

#32 glennbech

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 02:49 PM

I tried a very basic yeasted loaf today with great sucess.

500g flour (Italian '0') 100%
350g water (70%)
10g yeast. (2%)
10g salt. (2%)

The aim for this "exercise" was to handle a 70% hydrated dough. The hypothesis was that making a cold dough, and making sure not to over-handle should make it managable.

I measured my water to 9 degrees, the final dough ended up at about 15c, (but was up to 24 in no time). I kneaded the dough in the mixing bowl 3 times for the first 30 minutes, making sure to not overdo anything.

I baked it for 65 minutes, using a very hot stone on the lower rack of my electric oven. The sone had been warming up at my oven's max temp for about an our. I reduced the oven's temp t 200 and tossed in some ice cubes along with the loaf.

Great results, no sticking when I shaped it to a ball for proofing. The crumb is very fluffy, and cotton like. A real crunchy crust.

I was afraid of over-proofing it because of the temp, so as you can see from the crust (tearing in the gringe), I underproofed it slightly.

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Edited by glennbech, 27 July 2006 - 02:52 PM.


#33 Beanie

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 06:31 PM

That looks great. I feel like slathering a big glob of butter on it and eating the whole loaf. :raz: What did you do after the 30 minutes kneading? Did you wet your hands to handle the dough?
Ilene

#34 glennbech

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 11:24 PM

Beanie; Thanks! I spread a large chunk of raspberry marmelade on the loaves. mmmm... .-) Me and my wife ate half of it in no time! :-)

I didn't use any oil, sprinkled water both on the working surface, and hands. It works real well! Thanks for the tip!

Since the goal of my little "exercise" was wet dough handling, I took a few shortcuts. I fermented for about 30 minutes (for a total of total 60 minutes fermentation) after the initial kneadings. No time for stretch and fold. I turned on the oven, and proofed while the oven&stone got hot. (about 45-60)

I regret not proofing the loaf longer, as I think It had potential for even more volume. Not that it really matters, it was already ultra light and fluffy...

I was real happy with apearance/texture of this loaf. It is, however, a bit "tasteless". I think I'll try this loaf as a sourdough this weekend or next week. That'll be fun! :)

Edited by glennbech, 27 July 2006 - 11:26 PM.


#35 jackal10

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 12:34 AM

If you want more taste use a sponge and dough method. Also pre-mix the flour and the water and leave for an hour before adding the yeast/sponge, salt etc. Gives a chance for the flavours in the flour to develop

#36 lorinda

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 02:47 AM

That bread looks fantastic! Did you achieve what you were after (the Italian bread you liked)? How long did you bulk ferment?
"I'll just die if I don't get this recipe."

#37 glennbech

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Posted 28 July 2006 - 04:03 AM

Jack; I'll try tat later. -)

Lorinda; Well... Even though the crumb was very airy and light, with lots of uneven holes, the bread still has a "spongy" feel. With "spongy" I mean that if I poke the crumb in with my finger, the dent bounces back in less than a second.

I did this test with the italian bread (my wife was a bit embarrased at the restaurat, *smile*). When pushing the cumb of the Italian bread I talked about earlier, it took about 4-5 seconds before the dent in the crumb recovered fully.

I'll think I'll try baking with fats, and getting a weaker flour. I believe a lower gluten content will help. The real problem is getting weak flour, I may get my hands on "cake flour", but the suppermarkets really don't have that much to choose from here in Norway's capitol Oslo...

#38 glennbech

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 12:21 AM

A question about taste;

I made a real bland and teasteless yeasted bread from 100% pure white wheat flour during the weekend. I mean... It didn't taste a thing. We had to put tons of butter on, and sprinkle with kosher salt.

I have a few Ideas on what went wrong; Can anyone chip in and falsify/verfify my theories?

- Me and a friend took a boat trip for 60 minutes, while the dough was fermenting in the shade outside. It was a yeasted loaf with 1% fresh
yeast. When we got back, the dough had "exploded" all over the pan I fermented it in. It was huge, and had started to deflate.

Can the yeast "eat up" a lot of the starch, so much that it affects the taste of the loaf ?

- I was without my tools, and had no accurate scale. I know I put too little salt in....

- Flour quality... Is there such a thing? The All purpose flour I can get is very cheat (under $1/kg). I have no idea what the quality is. If flour a "fresh" product, that should be consumed within a certain time after milling? If I got "old" flour, does it taste bad/different from "fresh"?

Does bread made from one type of wheat, taste different/better than bread made form another wheat flour?

Im in the dark here, enlighten me ! :-)

#39 cognitivefun

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 04:55 AM

A question about taste;

I made a real bland and teasteless yeasted bread from 100% pure white wheat flour during the weekend. I mean... It didn't taste a thing. We had to put tons of butter on, and sprinkle with kosher salt.

I have a few Ideas on what went wrong; Can anyone chip in and falsify/verfify my theories?

- Me and a friend took a boat trip for 60 minutes, while the dough was fermenting in the shade outside. It was a yeasted loaf with 1% fresh
yeast. When we got back, the dough had "exploded" all over the pan I fermented it in. It was huge, and had started to deflate.

Can the yeast "eat up" a lot of the starch, so much that it affects the taste of the loaf ?

- I was without my tools, and had no accurate scale. I know I put too little salt in....

- Flour quality... Is there such a thing? The All purpose flour I can get is very cheat (under $1/kg). I have no idea what the quality is. If flour a "fresh" product, that should be consumed within a certain time after milling? If I got "old" flour, does it taste bad/different from "fresh"?

Does bread made from one type of wheat, taste different/better than bread made form another wheat flour?

Im in the dark here, enlighten me ! :-)

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Too high a fermentation speed, I would say.

In general, the slower the fermentation the better the flavor. It sounds like a combination of too high a temperature during fermentation, and too little salt.

Salt slows down fermentation. It is amazing how much faster yeast doughs ferment if you don't add yeast. The faster the fermentation, the less flavor.

Of course flour quality is also very important. But good long fermentation is essential to good bread.

Yeast doughs will do quite well fermenting in the refrigerator and the bread will taste better. Or at least ferment in a cool basement at 70F. if you can.

#40 tino27

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Posted 31 July 2006 - 07:06 AM

You might want to check out this page ... it has some good tips and a troubleshooting section that might help answer some of your questions.

http://www.kitchenco...y.com/bread.htm

Salt is definitely important for two reasons: flavor and helping to inhibit the growth of the yeast too quickly.
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