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resting Brulee Mix/ Ice Cream Base overnight-why?


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14 replies to this topic

#1 cakedecorator1968

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 09:01 PM

Here's a good question for all you food scientists:

Why does Creme Brulee Mix and Ice Cream Base work better when rested overnight in the fridge?

Perhaps something to do with the fat globules??????

Please tell me if you ever DO NOT rest your Brulee Mix because mine bake crappy every time if I prepare and bake the mix the same day.

#2 chezcherie

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 09:11 PM

i thought that resting brulee batter was done to eliminate bubbles that may have resulted from mixing. i vaguely recall resting the batter in ramekins, and then using a skewer to pop any bubbles on the surface, resulting in an unmarred top.
ice cream base? ya got me? maybe just to meld the flavors? i'll be interested to see what folks say about this...
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#3 Pork Belly

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 09:40 PM

I've made creme brulle countless times from different recipes and I have never chill the mix. Make the mixture, pour into ramekins and bake in a bain marie.
As for ice cream mix, leaving it overnight in the refrigerator is convenient to chill the mixture and nothing more. As long as the ice cream base is well chilled, it is ready for churning. I've made ice cream by chilling the base in a ice bath until very cold and then churn it. Works fine.

#4 nightscotsman

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Posted 30 June 2006 - 10:06 PM

I've baked brulee both chilled overnight and not. Not a big difference.

According to Emmanuel Ryon (translated from French), chilling and ice cream mix overnight allows the it to "mature", and "maturation allows the flavorings to develop which will be accentuated by the lactic ferments". Aging will also allow stabilizers and other dry ingredients to fully hydrate and improve the texture of the finished ice cream.

#5 aidensnd

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 02:30 AM

I always try to chill my brulee mix overnight. Whenever I don't I get a kind of semi-set foamy layer on top from all the tiny bubbles rising to the surface during baking. Also if the mix isn't cold my edges overcook before the center sets. I'm baking full size hotel pans at a time though. For smaller single serving brulees it doesn't seem to make AS much of a difference but I still think the well rested ones come out better.
As for the ice cream I've always thought that it was both to ensure the mix is properly chilled and to give the flavors time to develop.

#6 WhiteTruffleGirl

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 04:42 AM

i thought that resting brulee batter was done to eliminate bubbles that may have resulted from mixing. i vaguely recall resting the batter in ramekins, and then using a skewer to pop any bubbles on the surface, resulting in an unmarred top.

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There is a very simple way to get rid of your air bubbles. Once you've poured your mixture into your ramekins take your blow torch and very lightly go over the top of each one. Voila...no more air bubbles.

#7 miladyinsanity

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 05:43 AM

Another reason for chilling ice cream base is to enable it to freeze faster when you're churning it, such that the ice crystals will be smaller. This gives you a creamier product.
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#8 aidensnd

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 09:16 PM

There is a very simple way to get rid of your air bubbles.  Once you've poured your mixture into your ramekins take your blow torch and very lightly go over the top of each one.  Voila...no more air bubbles.

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This does work wonders for the bubbles that are visible on the surface, I torch any liquid 'batter' before baking, but doesn't help with the little micro bubbles that seem to hide under the surface, hence the overnight resting which will result in a 'foam' on top of your mix which is then discarded before using.

#9 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 10:49 PM

We're talking custard here, folks.

raw eggs, sugar, cream. BE VERY careful the bacteria just love it. Normally you're going to be Ok, but why take any chances.

In my experience overnight doesn't make enough of a difference to be worth it. Try
here for a different take on brulee. Then let your imagination go.

#10 aidensnd

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 12:00 AM

We're talking custard here, folks.

raw eggs, sugar, cream. BE VERY careful the bacteria just love it. Normally you're going to be Ok, but why take any chances.


What chances are you talking about? I'm confused by this post....

#11 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 12:19 AM

We're talking custard here, folks.

raw eggs, sugar, cream. BE VERY careful the bacteria just love it. Normally you're going to be Ok, but why take any chances.


What chances are you talking about? I'm confused by this post....

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Keeping a raw custord mix carries the risk of bacterial growth. The ingredients are an ideal culture. The risk is small, but present even if you are careful about refridgeration.

#12 Lee Ratliff

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 12:59 PM

Here's a good question for all you food scientists:

Why does Creme Brulee Mix and Ice Cream Base work better when rested overnight in the fridge?

Perhaps something to do with the fat globules??????

View Post


You're on the right track. I don't know anything about Creme Brulee, but ice cream is definitely improved by aging. It's partly due to cold mix freezing faster and making smaller ice crystals and a creamier texture. The other reason is related to the fat globules as you suspected. When your mix is initially heated, the tiny gobules of butterfat are melted and are essentially tiny droplets of melted butter. You need the fat globules to partially solidify (crystalize) so that they will stick together and form the correct structure with incorporated air bubbles. Cooling to refrigerator temperature does not immediately solidify the fat globules. It takes hours at low temperature for the fat to partially solidify.

Also, if you're using an emulsifier such as egg yolks, it takes a long time for the lecithin in the yolk to displace casein and whey proteins on the fat globules and help them to stick to each other.

Anyway, this is the long way of saying that the texture if ice cream will be greatly impoved by sitting in the fridge overnight.

#13 aidensnd

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 10:05 AM

We're talking custard here, folks.

raw eggs, sugar, cream. BE VERY careful the bacteria just love it. Normally you're going to be Ok, but why take any chances.


What chances are you talking about? I'm confused by this post....

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Keeping a raw custord mix carries the risk of bacterial growth. The ingredients are an ideal culture. The risk is small, but present even if you are careful about refridgeration.

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As long as the mix was cooled properly(rapdily), stored in the refrigerator, and baked the next day then I'd say the risk is small enough not to be a concern.

#14 alanamoana

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 10:36 AM

We're talking custard here, folks.

raw eggs, sugar, cream. BE VERY careful the bacteria just love it. Normally you're going to be Ok, but why take any chances.


What chances are you talking about? I'm confused by this post....

View Post


Keeping a raw custord mix carries the risk of bacterial growth. The ingredients are an ideal culture. The risk is small, but present even if you are careful about refridgeration.

View Post


most ice cream bases are cooked to a point that bacteria should be killed. also, proper cooling and storing should make it okay to store for about three days (usually a little longer)

brulee is raw, but then cooked...again, to the point that bacteria are killed. shouldn't be a problem unless you're using old or already rotten ingredients.

#15 Mikeb19

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Posted 06 July 2006 - 02:12 AM

We're talking custard here, folks.

raw eggs, sugar, cream. BE VERY careful the bacteria just love it. Normally you're going to be Ok, but why take any chances.


What chances are you talking about? I'm confused by this post....

View Post


Keeping a raw custord mix carries the risk of bacterial growth. The ingredients are an ideal culture. The risk is small, but present even if you are careful about refridgeration.

View Post


I don't know about you guys, but when I make a custard such as that for iced cream or crème brûlée, I cook it to a temperature of ~85 degrees C (crème anglaise). That's enough to kill any bacteria, plus it gives it a nice rich, creamy texture. Not cooking the custard is IMO bad technique...

As for resting the mixture, it's done for the same reason as letting a soup sit overnight. Gives the flavours a chance to combine, develop, plus you want the custard as cold as possible before it goes into the iced cream machine.