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Candied Citrus Peel - The Topic


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#1 swissmiss

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Posted 21 November 2002 - 02:46 PM

I have some beautiful oranges, and would like to make some candied and chocolate-covered orange peels. An Internet search gave me a few recipes, which are not consistent. I thought one had to boil the peels twice, but the Food Network's recipe (courtesy of Gourmet magazine), only calls for a 10-minute boil. Any help and recipe will be greatly appreciated!

Thank you!
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#2 micha

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Posted 21 November 2002 - 07:53 PM

I make great quantities of candied orange and grapefruit peel every Christmas and bring to the boil and drain only twice before cooking in the syrup. However, I use a vegetable peeler to remove the rind with no pith which makes for a very thin product. Perhaps whole peel would require more blanching to prevent bitterness -- must try it this year

#3 swissmiss

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Posted 21 November 2002 - 08:00 PM

Thank you for your response Micha. I think you are 100 percent right about the peel/rind nuances. Maybe I'll start with your version.
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#4 Bux

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Posted 21 November 2002 - 10:46 PM

I don't mean to be an alarmist and occasionally use a lemon, lime or orange peel in a recipe, but I've noticed in France that every time a recipe calls for citrus peel, they specify non traitee or something to that effect, meaning you should use the peel from a fruit that wasn't treated with pesticide or other toxic materia. I've also noticed in better supermarkets, those hypermarches that offer an incredible array of goods and run for country miles in the middle of either nowhere or a new shopping center, there is often an array of different grades of lemons, or oranges and some are definitely labeled as untreated. Here in the US, that kind of labeling is only required on the carton, if at all, and the local shop need not mentioned it on the display of oranges removed from their shipping cartons. I usually wash the skin if I'm going to use the peel, but some of those topical sprays can be absorbed. I figure I don't eat much of it in the long run, but it is a concern, especially as almost all the cartons I've seen say treated with some long name I can't fathom.
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#5 nightscotsman

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Posted 21 November 2002 - 11:08 PM

I don't mean to be an alarmist and occasionally use a lemon, lime or orange peel in a recipe, but I've noticed in France that every time a recipe calls for citrus peel, they specify non traitee or something to that effect, meaning you should use the peel from a fruit that wasn't treated with pesticide or other toxic materia. I've also noticed in better supermarkets, those hypermarches that offer an incredible array of goods and run for country miles in the middle of either nowhere or a new shopping center, there is often an array of different grades of lemons, or oranges and some are definitely labeled as untreated. Here in the US, that kind of labeling is only required on the carton, if at all, and the local shop need not mentioned it on the display of oranges removed from their shipping cartons. I usually wash the skin if I'm going to use the peel, but some of those topical sprays can be absorbed. I figure I don't eat much of it in the long run, but it is a concern, especially as almost all the cartons I've seen say treated with some long name I can't fathom.

Doesn't untreated = ogranic? Many mainstream grocery stores now carry organic produce, including oranges. It is usually labeled as such and kept separate from the conventionally grown selection.

#6 swissmiss

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 09:14 AM

Thank you for mentioning the non-traite factor Bux. I will buy organic oranges, which should be the same, as nightscotsman indicated. My grocery store has a (small) selection of organic fruits.
Anne E. McBride

#7 Simon Majumdar

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 09:37 AM

If you sweat the grated peel of citrus fruit with onions until it forms a jam, it makes an incredible dish to go with any fish

S

#8 swissmiss

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 09:52 AM

Simon this sounds wonderful. Stupid question, but should any sugar be added?
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#9 Simon Majumdar

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 10:02 AM

Simon this sounds wonderful. Stupid question, but should any sugar be added?

No sugar needed. The onions release a lot of sweetness as they cook

It is very very simple

Sweat two finely sliced red onions with one chopped green chilli and the zest of two ( in this case) oranges in a little oil and butter

Do this over a low heat for at least an hour ( more if needed )

The end consistency is jam like and has a wonderful sour sweet quality that works with all fish I have found ( oily fish is especcially good, try it with grilled sardines )

it also works as a side with roast duck

S

#10 hollywood

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Posted 22 November 2002 - 10:13 AM

I had a great aunt who made and sold Orange Walnuts, a sort of candy thing using I think blanched walnuts, sugar and flavor from orange peels. I used to gobble handfuls of the things.
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#11 TatarsHat

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Posted 23 November 2002 - 02:45 PM

Bux - That was a very good point you brought up regarding pesticides. Living in Florida, I know for a fact that the groves are sprayed for various maladies. My previous home had 6 large fruit trees and one year I had to spray them with Malathion due to leaf minor. The 2 trees I have now are healthy thank goodness. :biggrin:


Hollywood - That recipe for the sugared Walnuts sounds great! I had some fabulous walnuts in the UK but would really like to try them with the addition of orange peel. After that I would try dipping then in a thin coating of Lindt chocolate. :laugh:

#12 micha

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Posted 23 November 2002 - 05:53 PM

Unless authentically Organic, I think it's wise to assume that every fruit and vegetable has been exposed to some type of pesticide (and 'organics' may have been contaminated by any number of human-transmitted pathogens. Singling out citrus peel as risky doesn't make sense to me.

I wash, in mild detergent, and thoroughly rinse just about every fruit and vegetable that we use -- even those with peels that are discarded and not eaten. I understand that the pesticides used on tropical fruits such as bananas are so potent that transfer from hand to fruit is inadvisable.

If we were to avoid eating skins that have been exposed to pesticides then we would not be eating sugar snap peas, snow peas, strawberries, asparagus, tomatoes, baked potatoes, etc, etc, etc.

IMHO, it's wise to be cautious but not paranoid.

#13 swissmiss

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Posted 24 November 2002 - 12:25 AM

The December issue of Gourmet offers a recipe for candied citrus peel. I anxiously flipped the pages, but the actual recipe takes about two days to complete and seems unnecessarily complicated. Would anyone with more experience care to comment on it?
Anne E. McBride

#14 mjc

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Posted 01 June 2003 - 12:21 PM

Does anyone know if you can make candied orange peel dry faster? Maybe put them in the oven?

thanks.
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#15 Chewie

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Posted 04 June 2003 - 09:11 PM

I've had good sucess drying orange peels in the microwave at LOW power. I don't know if candied would work though, as the sugar would likely melt...good luck

#16 jhlurie

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Posted 04 June 2003 - 09:54 PM

How about one of those food dryer machines--you know the kind a lot of people use to accelerate fruit drying. Damnit, I don't remember brand names or anything. There are these big circular pans you sit stuff in, you plug the sucker in, and come back a day or two later when its leached all of the moisture from everything.
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#17 awbrig

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Posted 04 June 2003 - 09:57 PM

As far as dried fruits go Charlie Trotter dries them in the oven at a very low heat for a few hours. Not sure about the peels but will check it out. Check out his Nancy Silverton recipe in his first book, if you dont have it PM me...

#18 WHT

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Posted 04 June 2003 - 09:58 PM

Does anyone know if you can make candied orange peel dry faster?  Maybe put them in the oven?

thanks.

I have never had that problem. Maybe there is something off in your recipe? Or something off in the environment? If you have to force them to dry try an oven set to 200F.
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#19 mjc

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Posted 05 June 2003 - 07:18 AM

thanks everyone. It was pretty humid in my place, so that was a problem. I tried putting one batch in the oven at 200 and left the other out by a cool fan. The one in the oven did dry a little faster.
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#20 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 05 June 2003 - 08:08 AM

How about one of those food dryer machines--you know the kind a lot of people use to accelerate fruit drying.  Damnit, I don't remember brand names or anything.  There are these big circular pans you sit stuff in, you plug the sucker in, and come back a day or two later when its leached all of the moisture from everything.

You mean a dehydrator?

#21 WHT

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Posted 05 June 2003 - 12:34 PM

thanks everyone.  It was pretty humid in my place, so that was a problem.  I tried putting one batch in the oven at 200 and left the other out by a cool fan.  The one in the oven did dry a little faster.

You might want to increse the amount of sugar slightly to compensate.
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#22 eatrustic

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Posted 05 January 2005 - 11:44 PM

I use a lot of candied orange peel (homemade) in my baking throughout the year and was wondering if my technique can be improved upon to intensify the flavor. This technique differs slightly from peel that would be eaten as a confection.

I generally use thick skinned oranges (organic when possible) that I juice, scrape the pulp and membrane out of, cut in 1/4's and blanch the usual 7 times (changing the water). I go by the tenderness of the peel to decide if I have blanched enough as well as tasting to see how bitter it is. Correct?

My syrup is much lighter than that which is used for making garnishes or dipped in sugar. Generally I use 1 part water : 1/2 part sugar and poach for about 10 -12 minutes.

Ialso recycle the old orange syrup with the new if it is fairly recent.

Anything I can do to make this better????
Thanks

#23 Bernaise

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Posted 05 January 2005 - 11:57 PM

What do you mean by better? more orange-y? How about using real seville oranges in season?
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#24 eatrustic

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:11 AM

Yes, a more intense orange flavor. Sevilles will be nice (perhaps more of a bitter note than is usually needed for a lot of baked goods though) but that only works for a few months and I can only stockpile so much.

Believe me the Sevilles, Blood Oranges and Meyer lemons will get a good work out now that marmalade season is just about here.

#25 chiantiglace

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:35 AM

you only need to blanch them three times.

and have you ever thought ove making and orange syrup by pureeing the orange peel, straining and boild down with a little simple syrup to hard ball stage. Then coat the orange peel with that. you could also get an orange extract. I use that some times.
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#26 eatrustic

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 01:46 AM

You only need to blanch three times? Even if the peel is the thick kind?

#27 tsquare

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 11:38 AM

I made these last month - one blanch was fine - about 10 minutes? It was the recipe in "The Village Baker's Wife". The syrup was 1/2 cup water, 1 cup sugar, and some corn syrup (!). But I like the results.

#28 andiesenji

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 11:53 AM

Try making it in the microwave.
I have been doing this for some time and find that the flavor is more intense.

Try it with just a small amount, one orange will do.

cut the peel as usual, put it in at least a 1 quart pyrex bowl or measure - fill with water to the quart measure.
put in microwave and depending on the strength of your oven set it for 8 to 10 minutes, enough to get it boiling.

let it set for 5 minutes then pour off the water and refill, and repeat the process.

If the rind is quite thick, do it a third time and drain.

mix your syrup 1 to 1, sugar to water and pour over the peel.

Set the timer for 5 minutes (8 for low-power ovens)
allow it to rest for 10 minutes
set it again for 5 minutes
rest for 10
another 5 minutes

now allow it to cool completely -

microwave for 8 to 10 minutes.
The entire piece, including the white part should be translucent and show orange color.

Remove from syrup and place on a rack to drain.
Save the syrup to make more peel or use it to make zest syrup, cooking grated zest in the syrup and storing in the refrigerator for flavoring ices, ice cream, in salad dressing or marinades, etc.
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#29 eatrustic

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:35 PM

That is quite the technique andiesenji .
The first problem is : I don't have a microwave although I could obviously get access to one (and will try it)... and the batch size is a bit small.
I usually make batches of 18 oranges at a time and leave the peel in the syrup until needed . I then drain and chop.

That aside do I need to use so much sugar if the peel is going to be removed from the syrup and cut up for baking?

When blanching the peel, what am I looking for in "doneness" before proceeding to the syrup stage? It sounds like my 7 blanches are overkill.

Something I just thought of (and will try): What about using some of the orange juice to make the syrup or will this give a "cooked" flavor?

Thanks!

#30 phaelon56

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:57 PM

Andi - are you suggesting this

Try it with just a small amount, one orange will do.

just for the sake of trying the technique without first committing to a large number of orange peels or can this be done with a much larger number of peels?