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Rose petals


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#1 nyfirepatrolchef

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 12:32 PM

For eons Ive been dying to make them just to be fancy....Ive heard bits and pieces about how to....supposedly as simple as beaten eggwhites as a wash then dredge in granulated sugar then let them dry.
Somehow the old saying about if it sounds too good to be true...yknow?

*annnnnd*

Where do you get petals that havent been sprayed?

#2 Brad S

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 01:22 PM

I buy my flowers for garnishes through one of my produce prevayors.

You never want to use treated petels.

It;s seems that you pretty much got the info you need,let me just give you a bit more to help.
I lightly beat a couple of egg whites at room temp in a small bowl until frothy,add a cup of super fine sugar per eggwhite (two in this case).Make sure your petels are clean and bone dry.Have a sheet pan lined with parchment to put the petels as you go.I use tweezers to pick up the petels one at a time at the base then I use one of my daughters never been used little soft paint brush (thanks girls),coat the top and bottom of the petel with a very thin layer of the egg whites,then spoon the sugar over the moist petel (it's important to coat the entire petel well to avoid it messing up on you)tap of any excess sugar with the tweezer and let it set up for a couple hours before you use them for garnish
Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

#3 nyfirepatrolchef

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 03:35 PM

Thank you sir!
Hmmmmm....garnish???
I thought they were an edible confection kinda thing.
Always questioned that cuz of the raw egg.

#4 cabrales

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 03:58 PM

I've eaten candied rose petals in restaurants. I believe they might even be served with the petit fours (but in a separate container) at Alain Chapel, at least in recent years. (Note the above is from memory, and not notes)

#5 Brad S

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 04:00 PM

They are indeed edible,that's the whole idea,offering your guest something beautiful and special.

But I don't recomend eating them like peanut M&Ms Hmmmm
Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

#6 cabrales

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 04:16 PM

I would imagine roses of mixed colors could be utilized, including those varieties that have yellow as their main color and that are rimmed with burgundy. I appreciate one may not be able to select the color of roses that are known to be pesticide-free. I've also had candied rose petals at Lorain's Cote-Saint-Jacques. They adorned rose flavored ice cream and accompanied various berries. Alain Dutournier at Carre des Feuillants has a dessert called "Litchis frais a la gelle de rose, petales parfumes et vermicelles croustillants" (Fresh litchis with rose gelee, rose petals and "crunchy" vermicellis). My notes: "The litchees were nestled within a large glass cup of small-sized bits of rose gelee, which was a blush pink in color and very soft. All of this was enmeshed in a rose-scented liquid. The dessert was aromatic. The taste was good too. Presentation points for the use of burgundy-colored rose petals strewn aoss the plate on which the cup arrived, and for the inclusion of a crimpled entire rose petal in the gellee."

#7 Suvir Saran

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Posted 28 July 2002 - 11:45 PM

In India we make rose petal preserve. It is made from baby pink roses from Udaipur in Rajasthan for the most part. These were conisdered by the British to be the most fragrant rose in India.

They simply take several tons of rose petals and dry them in unending yardage of white muslin that is draped over the grass in the palace in Jaipur. The Sun in Jaipur for some reason was considered to be better for the drying process. As the leaves get dry, they ad sugar to the leaves and then leave them to wilt for several more days. After this process has taken place over several days, you have a jelly of sweet rose petals left.

It is sold called Gulukand in Indian stores. It is a key ingredient in paan and also is gret with vanilla ice cream.

#8 cabrales

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Posted 29 July 2002 - 04:29 AM

Fauchon NY (Madison Ave store) carries "Confit de Petales de Rose" (Rose Petal Preserve). The smallest glass jar appears to be 120 g. The ingredients are listed as cane sugar, rose petals, natural rose extract, gelling agent, fruit pectin, acidifier, concentrated lemon juice. There is an indication that 3 g of dry rose petals were used for each 100 g of preserve. :wink:

#9 Miss J

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Posted 29 July 2002 - 06:38 AM

I'm really enjoying this thread, especially as my unsprayed rose bush has just produced its first two lovely, sunset-pink blooms. Between that and the duck eggs I've scored, I'm seeing some candied petals in my future.

Cabreles, I'm interested in the rose ice-cream you've mentioned. Did it use a rose petal preserve, like what Suvir mentions? Or was it more of a rosewater-scented dish?

#10 cabrales

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Posted 29 July 2002 - 06:53 AM

Cabreles, I'm interested in the rose ice-cream you've mentioned. Did it use a rose petal preserve, like what Suvir mentions? Or was it more of a rosewater-scented dish?

Miss J -- My superficial take on the rose ice cream was that it had a rosewater scent. However, I lack knowledge on how the ice cream was made at Cote Saint-Jacques. The ice cream was arranged as a half-dome-shape in the middle of the plate. It had a tiny piece of cherry on the top of it. Then, surrounding the half-dome were the candied rose petals, in a yellow color with burgundy rimming. Surrounding that creation were various berries (including blackberries). :wink:

#11 Suvir Saran

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Posted 29 July 2002 - 09:39 AM

Miss J -- My superficial take on the rose ice cream was that it had a rosewater scent. However, I lack knowledge on how the ice cream was made at Cote Saint-Jacques. The ice cream was arranged as a half-dome-shape in the middle of the plate. It had a tiny piece of cherry on the top of it. Then, surrounding the half-dome were the candied rose petals, in a yellow color with burgundy rimming. Surrounding that creation were various berries (including blackberries). :wink:

And I envy you Cabrales for having eaten that great dessert. :smile:

Sounds amazing. And thanks for sharing the details with us.

#12 nyfirepatrolchef

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Posted 30 July 2002 - 09:48 AM

Sahadi Importers has the preserve too.

#13 Suvir Saran

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 01:49 AM

Sahadi Importers has the preserve too.

Do you know what the preserve tastes like? Where is it from?
Thanks for sharing this. :biggrin:

#14 chefette

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 06:40 AM

Quote : Suvir "They simply take several tons of rose petals and dry them in unending yardage of white muslin that is draped over the grass in the palace in Jaipur."

Sigh. It sounds soooo exotic and soooo beutiful.

I have always been attracted to the rose thing - Like Water for Chocolate, Candied Rose Petals, Rose ice cream... I recently purchased a bottle of Rose Petal Jam at a Market in Massachusets. I am far away from my fridge right now so don't know brand but have a sense that it might have been imported from England. At the price I paid it should have been imported straight from The 'Palace in Jaipu' (flutey music and wafting white curtains when you read that phrase please). Anyway, its really pretty, tastes yummy, and - best of all - has rose petals suspended in it.

Interesting point earlier about the different colored rose petals. Thinking about my own experience the petals used have invariably been pink ones. Never thought about it before. Hmmmmm. The possibilities...

I developed a Rose Opera Cake as a special dessert for an Indian Restaurant I was working with. My original idea was to serve it as a petit four on a candied rose petal.

I did serve the cake - sans petal at the NY Chocolate Show last fall during my demo on sculpting and it was very enthusiastically received. :smile:

#15 cabrales

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 06:52 AM

As members may know, Pierre Herme has a rose-flavored macaron in Paris (not necessarily in the US Wegmans facilities). Also, in Paris, Herme has a creation called the Ispahan, which involves combining a larger rose macaron with lychee. On top of the macaron is a single burgundy rose petal with a drop of translucent, dried sugar-type substance to mimic dew. See the Pierre Herme thread under France for additional details (unlinked). :wink:

#16 Steve Klc

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 07:33 AM

Chefette--I just went to the fridge. The brand of rose gelee is "Arome fleurs & fruits" and is a product of Canada: C. P. 611, St-Jean-sur-Richelieu (Quebec) Canada, J3B 6Z8.

$6.99 for 180 g, ingredients: water, glucose, sugar, organic roses, rose water, lemon concentrate, pectin.

And Suvir--I'm reading a few Greek and Middle eastern cookbooks right now and a few of them mention that red rose petals are the most fragrant. Have you only seen pink used in India?
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#17 Patrice

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 07:38 AM

Arômes Fleurs et Fruits are doing some interesting products. In my fridge, I have 2 bottles: one of Herbes de Provence jelyy ( still not open) and another of apple and hémérocales jelly that is quite good!!!
Patrice Demers

#18 Suvir Saran

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 08:20 AM

And Suvir--I'm reading a few Greek and Middle eastern cookbooks right now and a few of them mention that red rose petals are the most fragrant.  Have you only seen pink used in India?

In fact all colors that are fragrant are used. But the "Rani Pink" is the most famous. It is that Pink that Diana Vreeland called the Navy Blue of India. A very rich pink.

In Alwar though, the most pale pink roses are prized for their strong perfume and thus are taken to Jaipur where they are spread on muslin to dry in the gardens of the royal palace.

The color of the preserve made with pink petals is much more attractive. The darker petals almost get brown as they dry and become all sugary.

In Lucknow my grandmother tells me of their chef making Gulukand (rose petal preserve) with the "Shweta Gulab", the very white fragrant roses. This jam would have a beautiful cream color I am told.

Steven, I am sure all colors of roses must have been used. And in fact red roses are most abundant in most places. I am sure they were what had more mass appeal.

How did the Greek and the Middle Eastern use rose petals?

#19 Steve Klc

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 09:17 AM

Greeks and Eastern Mediterranean--I think mostly to make jams and rosewater--which would then be used in syrups, pastries with phyllo, served with rice puddings, ice cream, little fruit mixtures. For beverages, I've come across recipes for cold almond milk drinks flavored with rose and even plain spring water perfumed with rose petals. In desserts, rose seems most often combined with other flavors like mastic, orange blossom water, pistachios, lemon but really, you can find recipes and references to rosewater being combined with many, many things--all dried fruits, pomegranate seeds, etc. The one or two Turkish books I have have some interesting traditional dishes--a milk pudding with rosewater and a rice pudding with saffron and rosewater.

Suvir--have you ever seen preserves with the whole petal intact--as in the Canadian example I have? I love the Diana Vreeland pink as the navy blue of India line.
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#20 cabrales

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 09:26 AM

Suvir -- Could you describe the rosewater-flavored dessert/drink that Dimple Chat appeared to offer, at least from time to time? The rose flavor was a bit stark, but rather distinctively rose, I believe. :wink:

#21 Suvir Saran

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 05:12 PM

Suvir -- Could you describe the rosewater-flavored dessert/drink that Dimple Chat appeared to offer, at least from time to time?  The rose flavor was a bit stark, but rather distinctively rose, I believe. :wink:

Cabrales,

It is Falooda you mention. Unfortunately they use a commerical Rose syrup that has more artificial color and flavoring than anything real.

It is a drink made with seeds of a plant like Basil. These are soaked till they sweel and become like pearls of tapioca. These are mixed with milk, ice-cream and maybe rose, saffron or screwpine syrups. At times even Vetiver syrup is used.

#22 Suvir Saran

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 05:16 PM

The one or two Turkish books I have have some interesting traditional dishes--a milk pudding with rosewater and a rice pudding with saffron and rosewater.

Suvir--have you ever seen preserves with the whole petal intact--as in the Canadian example I have?  I love the Diana Vreeland pink as the navy blue of India line.

Wondered if you had found recipes for making a preserve.
Yes all over the Middle-East and India, rose syrup(gulab) is used alongside other syrups like Saffron (kesar or zaafran), Screwpine (kewra) or Vetiver (Khus).

I have eaten preserves with whole petals in Jaipur. But one can never find these commerically. I was being spoiled by the chief of Police of Rajasthan and his wife. So, it seemed like the entire police force of that state was trying to make this young boy ( I was in my late teens) happy and charmed. It was great fun.

And yes that line of Diana Vreeland is funny. I was shocked very recently at Asia Society when a person of a certain aura, showed up wearing a pink suit, I was shocked that any man could do something like that for a black tie event. He simply said he was coming to an Indian event and how could he not follow Diana Vreelands advice. :hmmm:

#23 Suvir Saran

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 05:18 PM

Quote : Suvir "They simply take several tons of rose petals and dry them in unending yardage of white muslin that is draped over the grass in the palace in Jaipur."

Sigh.  It sounds soooo exotic and soooo beutiful. 

I have always been attracted to the rose thing - Like Water for Chocolate, Candied Rose Petals, Rose ice cream...  I recently purchased a bottle of Rose Petal Jam at a Market in Massachusets.  I am far away from my fridge right now so don't know brand but have a sense that it might have been imported from England.  At the price I paid it should have been imported straight from The 'Palace in Jaipu'  (flutey music and wafting white curtains when you read that phrase please).  Anyway, its really pretty, tastes yummy, and - best of all - has rose petals suspended in it.

Interesting point earlier about the different colored rose petals.  Thinking about my own experience the petals used have invariably been pink ones.  Never thought about it before.  Hmmmmm.  The possibilities...

I developed a Rose Opera Cake as a special dessert for an Indian Restaurant I was working with.  My original idea was to serve it as a petit four on a candied rose petal. 

I did serve the cake - sans petal at the NY Chocolate Show last fall during my demo on sculpting and it was very enthusiastically received. :smile:

Chefette,

Memories such as those haunt me as I live many oceans away. But alas, when I am there, I miss NYC and my home.

Tell is more about that Rose Opera Cake please... and what restaurant were you working with? Is that something you can share? :smile:

#24 polly

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 05:55 PM

Yeah! Tell us about the opera cake.
Was it all pink and rosey or did you still cover it with chocolate?
Sounds very pretty.
Slightly off topic, but I have made a nice middle eastern style fruit salad with a mixture of dried fruit ( apple slices, apricot halves, prunes, currants) and almonds and pistachios soaked in a rose water and orange blossom flavoured syrup.
It's lovely for breakfast with yoghurt.
How sad; a house full of condiments and no food.

#25 cabrales

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 05:59 PM

polly -- Apologies for the "basic" nature of my question. How can one know which rose water specimens are edible? Are there particular brands that one should be attempting to purchase? :sad:

#26 polly

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 06:09 PM

Basic questions are my forte, Cabrales.
Most rosewater that is sold in a food shop or the food section of a shop, should be edible.
If the bottles have an ingredients list check that the main ingredient or 'base' is not alcohol, for this would be perfume.
In Australia I buy a Lebanese brand called AL-RABIH. They make all sorts of flower waters, pomegranite syrup and a lovely fig jam with whole fennel seeds in it.
How sad; a house full of condiments and no food.

#27 Steve Klc

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 06:31 PM

Suvir--the rose petal jam recipe I've come across that seems like it would work best is Claudia Roden's in "The New Book of Middle Eastern Food." One pound (red) petals, juice of 1.5 lemons, 2 C sugar, 2-3 T rose water. Simmer the petals in water with juice of 1/2 lemon for 30 minutes. Drain then make a syrup by boiling 2.5 C water with the sugar and the remaining juice for 10 minutes. After cooling, she adds the petals and allows to macerate for 24 hours. Then she returns the syrup and petals to a boil and simmers for 20 minutes, adds the rose water and then pours into a glass jar until cool.

I haven't tried it--but the author notes "I have not been able to make a good one with the roses from my garden. The petals remained tough under the tooth." So clearly the rose species plays a part--and perhaps adding a little science and French sophistication with pectin and different liquid sugars might help.
Steve Klc

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#28 Suvir Saran

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Posted 01 August 2002 - 12:03 AM

So clearly the rose species plays a part--and perhaps adding a little science and French sophistication with pectin and different liquid sugars might help.

What might you think those from the east that have had these preserves for just as long.. at least a thousand plus years... what French sophistry had they mastered? Maybe the science they knew, we still do not... Just wonder. For the preserves you get in Indian stores, Sahadi and several Middle Eastern markets around the world never have that problem.

But I have never tried making rose preserve in the US. IN India I made it as a teenager. The sun was the secret scientific ingredient in the recipe. And many days of full dry heat did the magical trick. And it also kept the rose preserve very simple, natural and very close to the actual flavor of the petals. ths sugar seemed like it trapped the flavors.

#29 Suvir Saran

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Posted 01 August 2002 - 12:05 AM

And I can certainly imagine French chefs doing some marvelous things with these preserves. The dessert Cabralles described sounded amazing.

#30 chefette

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Posted 01 August 2002 - 06:48 AM

There were a couple of questions about my Rose Opera Cake.

I was so psyched up about the rose idea that I wanted to use it for something, and I wanted to use it in a completely different way than I was seeing it used. I also had an idea that rose would be great with dark chocolate. The project I had at the time was to create French-style pastries using Indian flavors and spices.

My Rose opera is a traditional French-style opera cake except that I make a pistachio jaconde, use rose buttercream, and infuse the dark chocolate ganache with cardamom. I like the colors (green, pink, dark brown). When sufficiently motivated I serve it with a tiny decorative rosebud (made of chocolate) on top. I think it would be a tasty and beautiful plated dessert served with a plain creme anglaise, a rose syrup, a small dome of pistachio cream with an Adria-style thin caramel tuile with bits of candied rose petals suspended in it.


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