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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2006–2007)


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#181 eje

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Posted 24 January 2007 - 10:47 PM

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Blood and Sand Cocktail

1/4 Orange Juice (3/4 oz fresh Blood Orange Juice)
1/4 Scotch Whisky (3/4 oz Compass Box Asyla)
1/4 Cherry Brandy (3/4 oz Massenez Creme de Griotte)
1/4 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Cinzano Vermouth Rosso)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

This one is supposed to be named after the 1922 movie of the same name featuring Rudolph Valentino. The story of a bullfighter rising from a poor background only to be defeated by his own ambition.

As far as the cocktail goes, I think the Asyla is a bit too civilized for this company. The cocktail probably could have used a more assertive a Scotch. Also, while not syrupy, the Blood and Sand is pretty sweet. When I make it again, I will probably drop the Creme de Griotte to 1/2 oz.

Oh, and oddly, Patrick Gavin Duffy instructs this cocktail should be stirred, not shaken.

edit - add a couple links to much better writers than I tackling the mystery that is the Blood and Sand.

Professor gets some Education, Gary Regan, in a SF Chronicle Cocktailian column from 2003

Naming Names, Paul Clarke, from his Cocktail Chronicles blog in 2005

Edited by eje, 28 January 2007 - 05:17 PM.

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#182 eje

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 10:34 AM

Couple more notes about Blood and Sand.

First, my use of blood orange wasn't really planned. We have a couple kinds of oranges in the fridge, and I picked a small one I thought was a valencia. When I split it, I realized it was a blood orange. Well, "apropos," I thought. Also, these are very early season blood oranges, so still quite tart. The berry/musk doesn't really start to overwhelm the fruit until later in the year.

Blood and Sand is another of those cocktails that's been on my list to try for quite a while. I usually have all the stuff for it in the house. It just has never made it to the top of the list. There's the short list of regular cocktails, and the cool ones I read about in Regan's column or on the Internet... Any of those always seem more appealing than the BandS.

It certainly is an odd cocktail. Fairly mild on the alcohol front, not as sweet as a dessert cocktail, and neither dry nor aromatic enough to qualify as an aperitif or digestif.

Hard to know where it fits. Brunch, maybe?
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Erik Ellestad
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#183 slkinsey

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 12:58 PM

We really like the Blood & Sand at Casa slkinsey, although I typically modify it a bit to get a bit moree scotch smoke. I like something like this:

Modified Blood and Sand
0.75 oz : Famous Grouse
0.75 oz : Cherry Heering (I thougt this was standard for the B&S?)
0.75 oz : Carpano Formula Antica
0.75 oz : freshly-squeezed orange juice
0.25 oz : Lagavullin

For us, the smokey single malt seems to be just the bump this cocktail needs to go from interesting to delicious.


Eric, part of what may have been screwing up your B&S was the use of a creme liqueur in place of cherry brandy. Something like Cherry Heering or Cherry Marnier is going to have a different flavor than a creme liqueur, and should bring a lot less sweetness to the game.

Edited by slkinsey, 25 January 2007 - 01:01 PM.

Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#184 eje

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 01:25 PM

[...]
Eric, part of what may have been screwing up your B&S was the use of a creme liqueur in place of cherry brandy.  Something like Cherry Heering or Cherry Marnier is going to have a different flavor than a creme liqueur, and should bring a lot less sweetness to the game.

View Post

Grumble, grumble, I suppose.

Like I really need two giant bottles of cherry liqueur in the house.

Especially, if I find out they aren't that much different!

Anyone have experience with both brands willing to share some insight before I run out and try to find a bottle of Cherry Heering?

I will say the Massenez creme liqueurs do seem less sweet than those from some other French makers I've tried. Very intense fruit flavor and not tooth achingly sweet.

I tried a blueberry creme liqueur from Vedrenne and it was quite light on fruit flavor and as sweet as pancake syrup.

Edited by eje, 25 January 2007 - 02:50 PM.

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#185 eje

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 12:02 PM

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Bloodhound Cocktail

1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/4 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray Gin)
2 or 3 Crushed Strawberries (2 strawberries muddled in the shaker with a pinch of sugar. Off season strawberries are a tad on the tart side.)


Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Double strain if yer picky about seeds - eje)

I didn't have much hope for this one. Gin, vermouth, and strawberries seemed like a bad idea.

Ends up, it is quite tasty! With the gin, vermouth, and strawberries combining nicely into a single complex taste. The Tanqueray does poke its head out a bit as the cocktail warms. But, the initial taste and smell is just that of enhanced strawberries.

Many of the internet recipes for this say to, "garnish with 2 or 3 crushed strawberries," instead of shaking the gin, vermouth, and strawberries together. I'm unclear on that idea. On the side? Drizzle them in after you chill the other ingredients?

A fanned strawberry on the side of the glass would be a nice touch.

edit - By the way, some recipes I found for the Bloodhound suggest substituting strawberry liqueur for the fresh strawberries. To me, that takes what is intended to be a fairly dry strawberry cocktail and turns it into a dessert drink. I disapprove.

Edited by eje, 27 January 2007 - 01:08 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
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#186 gethin

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 03:48 AM

I didn't have much hope for this one.  Gin, vermouth, and strawberries seemed like a bad idea.



Bad idea or not - gin, vermouth and rasberry is a better one ! That's how they make Bloodhounds in Hawksmoor and they are delicious.

I'd assumed, possibly wrongly, that the rasberry version was the original, partly because its the better one and partly because Hawksmoor generally take care about authenticity. They claim the cocktail (or at least the rasberry one) was "introduced to thunderstruck London tipplers by the Duke of Manchester in 1922".

Gethin

#187 ThinkingBartender

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 04:59 AM

I didn't have much hope for this one.  Gin, vermouth, and strawberries seemed like a bad idea.



Bad idea or not - gin, vermouth and rasberry is a better one ! That's how they make Bloodhounds in Hawksmoor and they are delicious.

I'd assumed, possibly wrongly, that the rasberry version was the original, partly because its the better one and partly because Hawksmoor generally take care about authenticity. They claim the cocktail (or at least the rasberry one) was "introduced to thunderstruck London tipplers by the Duke of Manchester in 1922".

Gethin

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For those who are interested about what and where Hawksmoor is, here is their website.


"It seems obvious to us that the ever popular Mojito has its origins in the Mint Julep."

This theory has never been proven, and is based purely on the commonality of ingredients (i.e. mint). The common ancester of the Kentucky Mint Julep or Mojito is the Mint Sling in my opinion.

They seem to have ladled on every fact that they could get their hands on, the Mint Julep is a more complicated beast than most people imagine (madiera, claret, etc, etc).

Anyway, I am just nit-picking, it looks like a nice modern-styled place.


Cheers!

George

#188 eje

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Posted 28 January 2007 - 12:14 PM

re: Bloodhound. I've read that the cocktail was originally created with raspberries, too. Though, if they were already making the cocktail with Strawberries in 1930, it couldn't have been raspberries for long. Hawksmoor's drink menu does look nice. Their website reminded me I need to find a copy of Saucier's "Bottom's Up". For the recipes, really! Ouch, on those cocktail prices, though. And I thought New York and San Francisco were expensive!

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Blue Bird Cocktail

4 Dashes Angostura Bitters
3/4 Wineglassful of Gin (2 oz Tanqueray)
5 Dashes Orange Curacao (Teaspoon Brizard Orange Curacao)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

A 19th Century style Gin Cocktail (Link to Jerry Thomas' recipe on Art of the Drink) by any other name.

Edited by eje, 30 January 2007 - 10:52 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#189 eje

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 11:14 PM

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New Information

After lurking on Alibris for a while, I turned up a (relatively) reasonably priced copy of the Second Edition, 3rd Printing, of the Savoy Cocktail Book from 1936.

In the appendix, it does include a few pages of "New Cocktails", a couple corrections, and some cocktails apparently overlooked in the original edition.

While I try to figure out how to take an effective picture of the Blue Blazer without burning down the house or sending myself to the hospital, I'm going to catch up on the few from the appendix we have missed alphabetically.
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#190 eje

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 10:30 AM

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Albert Keller Cocktail

2/3 Bacardi Rum (2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)
1/3 Lime Juice (1 oz fresh lime juice)
1/2 Wine Glass Grenadine per 6 cocktails (1/3 oz homemade Grenadine)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

First cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" in the Second edition of the Savoy is the Albert Keller.

Now I'm not sure which Albert Keller this might be. There are at least 3 relatively well known Albert Kellers from the late 19th and early 20th century. Google turns up a Sociologist, author, and professor; a Swiss painter; and, finally, a ship captain.

Whichever gentleman preferred this cocktail, it seems simply to be a "Bacardi Cocktail, heavy lime". The instructions for, "1/2 wine glass grenadine per 6 cocktails," also indicate it was intended to be made as a "party" cocktail.

ThinkingBartender has written up the "Bacardi Cocktail" extensively in this topic:

The Bacardi Cocktail

I'll write a bit more about the Savoy Bacardi cocktails when we get to the one from the "New and Additional Cocktails" in a couple days.

edit - New digital camera, so bear with me while I get the hang of it.

Edited by eje, 01 February 2007 - 10:33 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#191 Vesper Lynd

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 04:30 AM

................................

Anyone have experience with both brands willing to share some insight before I run out and try to find a bottle of Cherry Heering?



It just so happens that I have a bottle of each in my bar, and as I sit here and type, I have shot of each in front of me :raz: The Cherry Heering has a much darker richer colour than the Creme de Griotte. The Heering also seemed to have a thicker consistency as it poured, which was subsequently backed up by it's luscious mouth feel. The Creme de Griotte had a stronger cherry nose than the Heering. Whilst there is nothing intrinsically wrong with the Creme de Griotte, the Cherry Heering was slightly drier and seemed to have a much fuller body to it, and would be my preference, however I certainly wouldn't complain if all that was on hand was Creme de Griotte :smile:

Edited by Vesper Lynd, 02 February 2007 - 04:31 AM.

I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis
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#192 eje

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 11:28 AM

re: Cherry Liqueur. Thanks for the info Vesper Lynd! Nose part makes sense to me, as I believe the Massenez Creme de Griotte is based on a Cherry Brandy base and the Heering on grape brandy.

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Atlantis Cocktail

1/4 Cointreau (3/4 oz Luxardo Triplum)
1/4 Pineapple Juice (Dole)
1/2 Scotch (1 1/2 oz Compass Box Asyla)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Second cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the Savoy Second Edition. So far, not terribly impressed with these. Quite sweet. Dash of lemon juice would go a long way to making this cocktail more appealing to me. Like with the Blood and Sand, I think the Asyla is a bit civilized for these proceedings, and its flavor is pretty much lost. I'm just getting orange and pineapple. Probably Famous Grouse or another less subtle blended Scotch would be more appropriate.

This is my first experiment with the Luxardo Dry Orange. I accidentally killed my bottle of Cointreau without comparing, so I can't do a side by side. The Triplum is 38% and Cointreau 40%, so no big difference there. The Triplum did seem to have a bit more of a bitter orange edge to it. I also noticed the alcohol more than I remember noticing with Cointreau.

edit - I also note from the De Danske Spritfabriker Heering page, that Heering is aged in oak for 3 years before being bottled.

Edited by eje, 02 February 2007 - 11:44 AM.

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#193 Chris Amirault

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 03:10 PM

A bit late to this party:

Bennett

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters
1/4 Lime Juice (1/2 oz Fresh Lime Juice)
3/4 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray)
(dash Rich Simple Syrup)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

I couldn't quite hang with this one without any sweetener at all. 

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If memory serves, Gary Regan's receipt is similar in Joy, with 1/2 oz simple syrup added to the gin, bitters, and lime, for similarly mouth-puckering reasons.

ETA: different proportions, too, for the gin and juice: 2 oz gin
1 oz lime juice
1/2 oz simple syrup
Angostura to taste

Edited by chrisamirault, 04 February 2007 - 03:36 PM.

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#194 eje

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 10:40 PM

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Bacardi Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime Juice (3/4 oz Lime Juice)
1/4 Grenadine (3/4 oz home made grenadine)
1/2 Bacardi Rum ( 1 1/2 oz Flor De Cana Extra Dry Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

Third cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the Second edition of the Savoy Cocktail Book. Despite anti-grenadine sentiment to the contrary, in my opinion, the first decent cocktail of the supplement.

Recent correspondence from eGullet member jazzyjeff shows that the Bacardi cocktail was actually part of the original first pressings of the Savoy. Not sure how to explain. Here is his picture.

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It looks like it was a recipe that was mislaid; but, that the publisher, authors or editors felt strongly enough about the Bacardi Cocktail to insert a part of a page to the first edition of the Savoy cocktail book.

The Bacardi cocktail was then included in the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the second edition.
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#195 JerseyRED

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Posted 03 February 2007 - 09:44 PM

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Bacardi Cocktail

1/4 Lemon Juice or Lime Juice (3/4 oz Lime Juice)
1/4 Grenadine (3/4 oz home made grenadine)
1/2 Bacardi Rum ( 1 1/2 oz Flor De Cana Extra Dry Rum)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

View Post


Hmmm, can you really call this a Bacardi cocktail when you're using Flor De Cana? Isn't that an aged rum, beside the fact that it isn't Bacardi? You know, a 7 & 7 should be Seagrams 7 & Seven-Up... (yuck)... otherwise, it isn't a 7 & 7. So a true Bacardi Cocktail should have, Bacardi.

As an aside, are all the variations of the Bacardi cocktail (grenadine or not) using "white" or aged Bacardi?

Trust me, I'm not being a "nudge". I've picked up a lot of info from your trip through the Savoy.. "I'm just saying".

Rich
"The only time I ever said no to a drink was when I misunderstood the question."
Will Sinclair

#196 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 01:44 AM

Hmmm, can you really call this a Bacardi cocktail when you're using Flor De Cana? Isn't that an aged rum, beside the fact that it isn't Bacardi? You know, a 7 & 7 should be Seagrams 7 & Seven-Up... (yuck)... otherwise, it isn't a 7 & 7. So a true Bacardi Cocktail should have, Bacardi.

As an aside, are all the variations of the Bacardi cocktail (grenadine or not) using "white" or aged Bacardi?

Trust me, I'm not being a "nudge". I've picked up a lot of info from your trip through the Savoy.. "I'm just saying".

Rich

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Here's my understanding:

Bacardi was THE Cuban Rum. Their particular genius was to age rum for a few years and then filter it again using proprietary technology. They would then sell it as a white rum. However, the aging had mellowed it, so it was much nicer than the other unaged white rum on the market. They had the foresight to leave Cuba before, well, things happened. Some portions of Bacardi became Havana Club, others became the larger Bacardi brand. Rum folks feel neither the Bacardi brand nor the Cuban Havana Club really live up to the pre-events Bacardi rums.

It's my opinion it's not really possible to make a 1930s era Bacardi cocktail, as that brand of rum really no longer exists.

Others have recommended Flor de Cana as a well regarded rum in the spirit of Havana Club. So I use it as a substitute for Bacardi and/or Havana Club.

Edited by eje, 04 February 2007 - 11:14 AM.

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#197 Vesper Lynd

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 02:34 AM

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Blue Devil

½ Dry Gin (40ml Bombay Sapphire)
¼ Lemon or Lime (20ml we made two versions one using freshly squeezed lemon and the other freshly squeezed lime)
¼ Maraschino (20ml Maraska Maraschino)
1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (1 drop Queen Blue food colour {lime} 2drops {lemon})
We love using food colouring to add colour to cocktails rather that the more usual precoloured cordials as it allows for the intensity of colour to be varied according to the mood.

Notes on Measurements; on this occasion we chose to us an Alessi jigger which is 40ml/20ml rather that the more standard 1oz (30ml)/ 1/2oz (15ml) as we felt it would simplify mixing this drink and the result would present better in our 4oz glasses.


Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Our first foray into this thread is the Blue Devil; we have left the Blue Blazer for Erik as we feel that it represents a cocktail better appreciated during the colder months.

What we imaged to be our first dilemma, choosing which Maraschino to use (Luxardo, Italy or Maraska, Croatia) turned out to be a non issue once we realised that we barely had half a shot of the Luxardo left. However for the sake of the exercise we did do a quick comparison, and found that the Luxardo had a more pronounced nose in which the pip of the cherry was easily detected. On the pallet we found the Luxardo to be quite sweet with hints of cinnamon, whilst the Maraska was comparatively drier and with a slight citrus tang to it.

The next issue was whether to use Bombay Sapphire or Plymouth gin, in the end we plumped for our favourite the Bombay.

This cocktail immediately put us in mind of one of our favourites the Aviation, although the recipe we favour is the one in Harrington & Moorehead’s “Cocktail The Drinks Bible for the 21st Century”, 1 ½ oz Gin, ½ oz Maraschino ¾ oz lemon juice. So we returned to the bar to mix up one of these to throw into the mix (so to speak). We feel that the Blue Devil proved to be a far more balanced drink than the Aviation with no one ingredient clamouring for ones attention.

When it came to the comparison of lemon Vs. lime in the Blue Devil, we feel that for our palette the lemon provided a better result. This visually appealing cocktail is well balanced, refreshing and easy to drink, and should appeal to all but the sweetest of palettes.

P&J
I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis
~Alleged last words of Humphery Bogart.

#198 JerseyRED

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 09:00 AM

Hmmm, can you really call this a Bacardi cocktail when you're using Flor De Cana? Isn't that an aged rum, beside the fact that it isn't Bacardi? You know, a 7 & 7 should be Seagrams 7 & Seven-Up... (yuck)... otherwise, it isn't a 7 & 7. So a true Bacardi Cocktail should have, Bacardi.

As an aside, are all the variations of the Bacardi cocktail (grenadine or not) using "white" or aged Bacardi?

Trust me, I'm not being a "nudge". I've picked up a lot of info from your trip through the Savoy.. "I'm just saying".

Rich

View Post

Here's my understanding:

Bacardi was THE Cuban Rum. Their particular genius was to age rum for a few years and then filter it again using proprietary technology and sell it as white rum that was much nicer than the other unaged white rum on the market. They had the foresight to leave Cuba before, well, things happened. Some portions of Bacardi became Havana Club, others became the larger Bacardi brand. Rum folks feel neither the Bacardi brand nor the Cuban Havana Club really live up to the pre-events Bacardi rums.

It's my opinion it's not really possible to make a 1930s era Bacardi cocktail, as that brand of rum really no longer exists.

Others have recommended Flor de Cana as a well regarded rum in the spirit of Havana Club. So I use it as a substitute for Bacardi and/or Havana Club.

View Post


Educated once again!

Ironically, I received a bottle of Flor De Cana last night and shall try a few of the variations of the Bacardi Cocktail.

Thanks for the explanation and info!

Rich
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Will Sinclair

#199 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 10:14 AM

[...]
When it came to the comparison of lemon Vs. lime in the Blue Devil, we feel that for our palette the lemon provided a better result. This visually appealing cocktail is well balanced, refreshing and easy to drink, and should appeal to all but the sweetest of palettes.

P&J

View Post

Welcome to eGullet P&J (aka Vesper Lynd)!

Thanks for joining in on the Stomp through the Savoy!

With the three of us working on it, it might only take a year or two, instead of the projected three or four years.
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#200 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 10:59 AM

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Bamboo Cocktail

1/4 French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Prat)
1/4 Italian Vermouth (1 oz Carpano Antica)
1/2 Dry Sherry (2 oz Lustau Solera Reserva Dry Oloroso Sherry "Don Nuño")

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass (over rocks -eje). (Squeeze orange peel over drink, and drop in glass. - eje)

Third cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the second edition of the Savoy Cocktail book.

Made this a tad on the large side as a long cocktail. Not bad at all. Went very well with some blue cheese we were having before dinner.
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Erik Ellestad
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#201 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 11:10 AM

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Blackthorn Cocktail (No 2)

Dash Orange Bitters (The Bitter Truth)
2/3 Sloe Gin (2 oz Homemade Plymouth Gin based Black Plum liqueur, jackal10 procedure.)
1/3 Italian Vermouth (1 oz Carpano Antica)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass

Cocktail from the "New and Additional Cocktails" section of the second edition of the Savoy Cocktail book.

First time I've tried this liqueur since I put it down last summer. I wasn't really sure what to expect, as I don't think I've ever actually had sloe or damson gin. Boy is it tasty, though! Incredibly complex in combination with the Vermouth. Plum gin is going to have to go on the regular summer liqueur schedule!
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Erik Ellestad
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#202 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 12:18 PM

Blue Blazer (for 3 - eje)

Use two large silver-plated mugs, with handles. (Two 30 oz mixing tins with thick towels - eje)

1 Wineglass Scotch Whisky (6 oz George T. Stagg, Antique Collection 2006)
1 Wineglass Boiling Water (6 oz)

Put the Whisky into one mug, and the boiling water into the other,


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ignite the Whisky with fire,


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and while blazing mix both ingredients by pouring them four or five times from one mug to the other.


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If done well this will have the appearance of a continued stream of liquid fire.


Sweeten with one teaspoonful of powdered white sugar (3 tsp caster sugar), and serve in a small bar tumbler, with a piece of lemon peel (orange peel).

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The Blue Blazer does not have a very euphonious or classic name, but it tastes better to the palate than it does to the ear.  A beholder gazing for the first time upon an experienced artist compounding this beverage, would naturally assume it was a nectar for Pluto rather than Bacchus.  The novice in mixing this beverage should be careful not to scald himself.  To become proficient in throwing the liquid from one mug to the other, it will be necessary to practice for some time with cold water.


Unfortunately, very difficult to catch how truly cool preparing the Blue Blazer looks on camera. The room fills with the wonderful smell of the hot whisky.

I don't have any barrel proof Scotch, so I decided to used the George T. Stagg instead. I did think I would be able to light the Stagg, (given it is 140.6 proof,) without heating it; but, found I did need to raise its temperature a bit before it would ignite.

The guests suggested I could make good money preparing Blue Blazers at parties.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#203 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 01:27 PM

But was it as good as advertised?
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#204 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 01:53 PM

But was it as good as advertised?

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It's hard to beat a flaming whisk(e)y toddy!

Comments from the evening's guests were, "Oooo, that's really good!" and, "It warms you all the way down to your toes!"

So, yeah, I'd say Mr. Thomas' creation was quite the hit.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#205 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 07:13 PM

Blue Blazer history.

According to Lucius Beebe in "The Stork Club Bar Book", the Blue Blazer was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas in 1849 while he was working at the El Dorado bar here in San Francisco.

The story goes, a patron came into the bar and demanded of Professor Thomas that he, "Fix me some hell-fire that will shake me right down to my gizzard."

"Professor Thomas smiled and quietly poured a tumbler of Scotch Whisky into one of the mugs, followed by a slightly smaller quantity of boiling water. Then with an evil smelling sulphur match, he ignited the liquid, and as the blue flame shot toward the ceiling and the crowd fell back in awe, he hurled the blazing mixture back and forth between the two mugs, with a rapidity and dexterity that was well nigh unbelievable. This amazing spectacle continued in full movement for perhaps ten seconds, and then the professor poured the beverage into a tumbler and smothered the flame. He stirred in a spoonful of pulverized white sugar into the mixture, added a twist of lemon peel, and shoved the smoking concoction across to the booted and spurred giant.

"'Sir,' said Professor Thomas, bowing, 'The Blue Blazer!'

"The boastful miner threw back his head and flung the boiling drink down his throat. He stood motionless for a moment, smacking his lips and tasting the full flavor of it, and then startled expression spread across his face. He swayed like a reed in the wind. He shivered from head to food. His teeth rattled. He batted his eyes. His mouth opened and closed; he could no longer say nothing. Then he sank slowly into a chair. He was no longer fit to be tied."

Beebe attributes the quotes above to "The Bon Vivant's Companion", edited by Herbert Asbury.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#206 eje

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 07:24 PM

Some folks expressed some interest in which cocktails were added to the second edition of the Savoy Cocktail Book, so I made a list. I've also scanned the pages. They're too big to post on eGullet. If you're interested, drop me a PM and I'll be happy to send them to you.

Recipes in the "New and Additional Cocktails" section are:

Albert Keller Cocktail
Atlantis Cocktail
Bacardi Cocktail
Bamboo Cocktail
Blackthorn Cocktail (No. 2)
Booksellers' (Special) Pride
Clam Juice Cocktail
Devonshire Pride
DOM Cocktail
Fly Fisher's Cocktail
Golden Dawn
Gun Cotton
Hercules Cocktail
Jazz Cocktail
Jersey Lightning
Lone Tree Cocktail
Love Potion Cocktail
Lulu's Favourite
Monk Cocktail
Roosevelt Pick-Me-Up
Silent Third Cocktail
Summit Cocktail
Tomato Juice Cocktail

After the above there is one final page titled "Miscellaneous Drinks"
the cocktails on that page are:

Gin Sling "See the Formula for this on page 190. This is much
improved by the addition of the juice of half a lemon"
John Collins "See the Formula for this on page 190. Dry Gin should be
used in preference to Hollands Gin."
Pousse Cafe
Planter's Punch
  • FrogPrincesse likes this
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#207 Vesper Lynd

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 04:50 AM

Posted Image

Blue Monday

¼ Cointreau (20ml Cointreau)
¾ Vodka (60ml Vodka-O)
1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (2 drops Queen Blue food colour)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.


We find that blue drinks have an alluring visual appeal that beckons one to dive headlong into their cooling embrace. This one didn’t disappoint and proved to be our pick of the evening. This cocktail showed a degree of complexity bellied by the simplicity of the ingredients, and all complemented by a rounded, viscous mouth feel.
I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis
~Alleged last words of Humphery Bogart.

#208 Vesper Lynd

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 04:52 AM

Posted Image

Blue Train


¼ lemon juice (20ml freshly squeezed lemon juice)
¼ Cointreau (20ml Cointreau)
½ dry Gin (40ml Tanqueray)
1 Dash Blue Vegetable Extract (1 drops Queen Blue food colour)


Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Whilst this recipe is very similar to the Blue Devil (Cointreau rather that Maraschino), we found that the lemon tended to over power the other ingredients. We’re not sure if that is because the Cointreau is less able to stand up to the acidity than the Maraschino or whether it is due to our switch to Tanqueray in preference to the Bombay Sapphire we used in the Blue Devil, or was it just a difference in our mood? We will be very interested to see what others think.
I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis
~Alleged last words of Humphery Bogart.

#209 Splificator

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 07:45 AM

Blue Blazer history.

According to Lucius Beebe in "The Stork Club Bar Book", the Blue Blazer was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas in 1849 while he was working at the El Dorado bar here in San Francisco.

The story goes, a patron came into the bar and demanded of Professor Thomas that he, "Fix me some hell-fire that will shake me right down to my gizzard."

"Professor Thomas smiled and quietly poured a tumbler of Scotch Whisky into one of the mugs, followed by a slightly smaller quantity of boiling water.  Then with an evil smelling sulphur match, he ignited the liquid, and as the blue flame shot toward the ceiling and the crowd fell back in awe, he hurled the blazing mixture back and forth between the two mugs, with a rapidity and dexterity that was well nigh unbelievable.  This amazing spectacle continued in full movement for perhaps ten seconds, and then the professor poured the beverage into a tumbler and smothered the flame.  He stirred in a spoonful of pulverized white sugar into the mixture, added a twist of lemon peel, and shoved the smoking concoction across to the booted and spurred giant.

"'Sir,' said Professor Thomas, bowing, 'The Blue Blazer!'

"The boastful miner threw back his head and flung the boiling drink down his throat.  He stood motionless for a moment, smacking his lips and tasting the full flavor of it, and then startled expression spread across his face.  He swayed like a reed in the wind.  He shivered from head to food.  His teeth rattled.  He batted his eyes.  His mouth opened and closed; he could no longer say nothing.  Then he sank slowly into a chair.  He was no longer fit to be tied."

Beebe attributes the quotes above to "The Bon Vivant's Companion", edited by Herbert Asbury.

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This is a charming story, but alas it is most unlikely that it has the added advantage of being true. I'll save specifics for my book, but it should be noted that nowhere did Thomas actually claim to have invented the drink, while others did claim it with some degree of plausibility.

As for execution: there is no need to preheat the whisky. That's certainly something that would not have been possible in an old time saloon. The best way I've found to make this drink work is to pour the boiling water into the mug, briefly stir in the sugar, and then carefully pour the whiskey in on top, in effect layering it (and yes, a cask-strength single malt is very useful here). The water volatizes the whisky, and then it should light. When pouring, also never pour more than half a mug at a time. This keeps the flames going.

I wish I could post film here....
aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

#210 ThinkingBartender

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 09:58 AM

Blue Blazer history.

According to Lucius Beebe in "The Stork Club Bar Book", the Blue Blazer was invented by Professor Jerry Thomas in 1849 while he was working at the El Dorado bar here in San Francisco.

The story goes, a patron came into the bar and demanded of Professor Thomas that he, "Fix me some hell-fire that will shake me right down to my gizzard."

"Professor Thomas smiled and quietly poured a tumbler of Scotch Whisky into one of the mugs, followed by a slightly smaller quantity of boiling water.  Then with an evil smelling sulphur match, he ignited the liquid, and as the blue flame shot toward the ceiling and the crowd fell back in awe, he hurled the blazing mixture back and forth between the two mugs, with a rapidity and dexterity that was well nigh unbelievable.  This amazing spectacle continued in full movement for perhaps ten seconds, and then the professor poured the beverage into a tumbler and smothered the flame.  He stirred in a spoonful of pulverized white sugar into the mixture, added a twist of lemon peel, and shoved the smoking concoction across to the booted and spurred giant.

"'Sir,' said Professor Thomas, bowing, 'The Blue Blazer!'

"The boastful miner threw back his head and flung the boiling drink down his throat.  He stood motionless for a moment, smacking his lips and tasting the full flavor of it, and then startled expression spread across his face.  He swayed like a reed in the wind.  He shivered from head to food.  His teeth rattled.  He batted his eyes.  His mouth opened and closed; he could no longer say nothing.  Then he sank slowly into a chair.  He was no longer fit to be tied."

Beebe attributes the quotes above to "The Bon Vivant's Companion", edited by Herbert Asbury.

View Post

This is a charming story, but alas it is most unlikely that it has the added advantage of being true. I'll save specifics for my book, but it should be noted that nowhere did Thomas actually claim to have invented the drink, while others did claim it with some degree of plausibility.

As for execution: there is no need to preheat the whisky. That's certainly something that would not have been possible in an old time saloon. The best way I've found to make this drink work is to pour the boiling water into the mug, briefly stir in the sugar, and then carefully pour the whiskey in on top, in effect layering it (and yes, a cask-strength single malt is very useful here). The water volatizes the whisky, and then it should light. When pouring, also never pour more than half a mug at a time. This keeps the flames going.

I wish I could post film here....

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youtube?

Here is a link to Andreas Masso, famed London Mixologist, making a Blue Blazer:

http://video.google....8536&q=cocktail



Anyhow, what sources would Lucius Beebe have drawn upon to make his conclusions?

I have tried to make a Blue Blazer a few times, and I have been lucky to emerge untinged, and as hairy as ever. But the drink was not spectacularly made and was just a toddy with a bit of acrobatics, and lots of "fearing for the worst" (from me).

Cheers!

George