Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2006–2007)


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
609 replies to this topic

#481 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:32 AM

Posted Image

Cold Deck Cocktail

1/4 White Crème de Menthe. (1/4 oz Brizard)
1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso)
1/2 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Reduced Crème de Menthe a bit. Still the dominating element of the cocktail.

Not sure what I think about this one. It is very minty. Not exactly in an unpleasant way though. Was having some Elk Creamery Camembert de Chevre and crackers at the same time, and expected it would be a bad flavor combination, as many cocktails are. It was actually quite nice.

The Maison Surrenne is a very different Cognac from the Pierre Ferrand Ambre. Stronger in the wood and vegetal characteristics, where the Pierre Ferrand is fruity/citrus and white pepper. It will certainly be interesting to see how it works out in other cocktails.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#482 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 17 August 2007 - 09:28 AM

Posted Image

Colonial Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Grape Fruit Juice. (1 oz fresh squeezed Grapefruit Juice)
3 Dashes Maraschino. (Luxardo)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

While I wouldn't quite call this a "great" or "amazing" cocktail, it is pleasantly refreshing and enjoyable enough. I imagine it would be quite nice on a hot day. If we ever had any of those here in San Francisco.

One thing I noticed was that this flavor combination really highlighted the nutty flavor aspects of the Luxardo Maraschino.

edit - Oh, yeah, not too far from the Daiquiri variant reputedly enjoyed by Hemingway, eh?

Edited by eje, 17 August 2007 - 09:30 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#483 jmfangio

jmfangio
  • participating member
  • 319 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 17 August 2007 - 04:43 PM

Colonial Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin. (2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Grape Fruit Juice. (1 oz fresh squeezed Grapefruit Juice)
3 Dashes Maraschino. (Luxardo)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

While I wouldn't quite call this a "great" or "amazing" cocktail, it is pleasantly refreshing and enjoyable enough.  I imagine it would be quite nice on a hot day.  If we ever had any of those here in San Francisco.

One thing I noticed was that this flavor combination really highlighted the nutty flavor aspects of the Luxardo Maraschino.

edit - Oh, yeah, not too far from the Daiquiri variant reputedly enjoyed by Hemingway, eh?

View Post


Or, tweak the proportions a bit and garnish with a ming sprig, and it's a Seventh Heaven No. 2. I haven't tried this version, but I quite like the Seventh Heaven. However, these two recipes remind me of what Martin Doudoroff said way back on the second page of this thread, regarding the Savoy as an early example of a 'shovelware' book, "- many recipes are essentially identical except for name or some trivial detail."
"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

#484 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 19 August 2007 - 10:11 AM

Posted Image

Cooperstown Cocktail
1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (1 oz Cinzano Rosso)
1/3 Dry Gin. (1 oz Junipero Gin)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass. Add a sprig of Mint.

I first made this cocktail with another of our local gins, No. 209.

Unfortunately, it really didn't have the Cojones to stand up to the dual vermouths in these proportions.

With the Junipero, it is a pretty enjoyable cocktail. A dash or two of bitters, and we'd be cooking with gas.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#485 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 21 August 2007 - 09:39 AM

Posted Image

Cordova Cocktail
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Lucid Absinthe)
1 Teaspoonful Fresh Cream.
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I was making dinner and had some fennel fronds around, so I dropped a couple on top.

This was kind of weird.

Cream, Gin, Sweet Vermouth, and Absinthe really isn't a combination I would think of.

It's not a bad cocktail; but, really didn't do a lot for me, either. I'd say, probably, I would greatly prefer it without the cream, thank you very much.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#486 bostonapothecary

bostonapothecary
  • participating member
  • 1,235 posts
  • Location:have shaker will travel

Posted 21 August 2007 - 09:54 AM

Posted Image

Cordova Cocktail
2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Lucid Absinthe)
1 Teaspoonful Fresh Cream.
1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Cinzano Rosso)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.



hmm. i will either skip trying that one or scrap the cream and go egg yolk....
abstract expressionist beverage compounder
creator of acquired tastes
bostonapothecary.com

#487 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 22 August 2007 - 06:29 PM

The Corn Popper

1 Pint Corn (Georgia or Maryland).
1/2 Pint Cream.
The Whites of 2 Eggs.
1 Tablespoonful Grenadine.

Fill highball glasses half full of this mixture and fill up with Vichy or Seltzer.

This is another of the recipes Craddock (or the Savoy editors) cribbed verbatim from Judge Jr.'s "Here's How".

The recipe in "Here's How" includes the following recommendation, "Don't get near a fire after one of these!"

Being the literalist that I am, and knowing that most of the commercial "corn whiskey" is of questionable merit, I was thinking I would use some semi-vintage J.W. Dant Bourbon I found at a liquor store. It's the only whiskey I have that actually tastes like corn.

However, I decided to double check on "Corn", so consulted our resident "Moonshine" (Link to his excellent book on the subject) expert Matt Rowley in regards to that cocktail.

He replied:

Now you've drifted into some interesting semantic territory rather than merely obscure ingredients.

In the Savoy book, some things are what they seem - absinthe is generally that, despite variations in style. So is applejack (usually). "Corn" is a shorthand code, especially a post-prohibition work, merely for illicit spirits (often, but not necessarily, whiskey) that may be made from nearly any ingredient except fruit, but including sugar, wheat, rye, "ship stuff," sorghum, cattle feed, mule chop, and, on occasion, corn.

Just like "The South" is used as a false badge of authenticity when attributing origins to quite local corn whiskey, "corn" itself is a suspect appellation.

Shake loose that notion that "corn" is ever really corn whiskey. Unfortunate, but there it is. From the 1920's through the late 1990's, sugar formed the backbone of American off-the-books distilling. It was cheaper, faster, and more profitable to make sugar spirits than corn. When the price was right, you could call it whatever you want.

Also, there is and was such diversity in manufacture from unregulated distillers that November's corn was rarely the same as August's (which may, in fact, be more prone to being an ersatz whiskey because the harvest wasn't in yet). Even today's new wave of home distillers who are very serious about their brandies and absinthe will bump their corn with table sugar.

Add to that regional flavor profile variants, the effect of water on the flavor profile (both in fermenting mash and cutting the distillate), and the taste and sugar content variability of pre-prohibition heirloom maize among genuine corn and you quickly find that a cocktail specifying "corn" might as well specify "liquor" as an ingredient.

As you've noted, the nationally available commercial examples of corn whiskey are, well, less than inspiring and I've yet to find one I'd recommend as anything than a learning experience.

If all you have available is commercial corn liquor, try the corn popper with bourbon (or white dog if you can lay your hands on some) - it's probably not a bad place to begin even though most corn - real or not - tends to be clear, uncolored, and often unaged whiskey. This is not the time to break out your finest as you wander into Delmarva milk punch territory.


Well, alright, then. With that in mind I set about re-doing the recipe for a single serving.

The Corn Popper

1 1/2 oz clear, pungent, liquid of unknown origin
1 egg white
3/4 oz Cream
1 teaspoon Grenadine (homemade)

Measure ingredients into cocktail shaker. Seal and shake well. Break seal, add ice and shake vigorously. Strain into collins glass. Top with selzer or sparkling mineral water.

Posted Image

The drink has a nice flavor of yeast and malt. Reminded me a bit of a very potent malted egg cream.

Also, interesting, that the drink really isn't very sweet. I was being pretty generous in using a whole teaspoon of Grenadine, as Savoy/Judge Jr. only call for a tablespoon of grenadine in a pint of liquor and a half pint of cream.

This probably betrays some weakness of character on my part; but, I was having a Unibroue Maudite later in the evening, and thought, you know, topping up the Corn Popper with Maudite instead of sparkling water might be kind of nice.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#488 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 27 August 2007 - 11:51 PM

Posted Image

The Cornell Special Cocktail

1/4 Part Gin. (3/4 oz Tanqueray)
1/4 Part Benedictine. (3/4 oz Benedictine)
1/4 Part Lemon. (3/4 oz Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice)
1/4 Part Lithia Water. (3/4 oz Gerolsteiner Heavy Mineral Content Mineral Water)

Stir well and serve in cocktail glass.

Well, this one gave me a lot of trouble. I found some online sources that purported to sell "Lithia Water" but none of them would return my phone calls or emails. Driving all the way to Ashland, Oregon seemed pretty crazy.

Did some more research, trying to find mineral waters with a high mineral content and taste. Gerolsteiner was one, and according to some web sites, actually contains some Lithium (Not to mention 8% of your daily allowance of Calcium! Now that is heavy mineral content!)

A lot of chasing around for a drink that ends up tasting like slightly herbaceous, sparkling lemonade. It is certainly easy drinking.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#489 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 29 August 2007 - 09:28 AM

Posted Image

Coronation Cocktail (No. 1)

1/2 Sherry. (1 1/2 oz Domecq La Ina Fino Sherry)
1/2 French Vermouth. (1 1/2 oz Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth)
1 Dash Maraschino. (Luxardo)
2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (1 dash Regan's, 1 dash Fee's)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Again, prefer these sorts of things on the rocks, so there you go.

I dunno, this was really nice. I think I am coming around to dry sherry.

Earlier in the evening, I was experimenting with Aviation proportions and different violet liqueurs. Palate was pretty jaded from it all. This was a pleasant, simple, relief from all that perfumed nonsense.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#490 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 31 August 2007 - 01:49 PM

Posted Image

Coronation Cocktail (No. 2)

1 Dash Peppermint. (Brizard Creme de Menthe)
1 Dash Peach Bitters. (Fee's)
3 Dashes Curacao (teaspoon Brizard Orange Curacao)
2/3 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alembic Brandy)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Well, here's another one that doesn't add up to 1, again lending weight to the idea that the fractions in the Savoy may be a proportion of some standard measure.

This is actually quite enjoyable. Nice feature for the peach bitters, not too sweet.

Wasn't sure about "Peppermint". If that meant something like Peppermint extract or a liqueur. Such a small amount, it probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference, whether extract or liqueur.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#491 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 02 September 2007 - 09:29 AM

Posted Image

Corpse Reviver (No. 1)


1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Apple Brandy or Calvados. (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/2 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

To be taken before 11 a.m., or whenever steam and energy are needed.


Apparently "Corpse Revivers" were a class of pre-prohibition drinks meant to be taken as "hair of the dog".

By the time we get to the 30s only about 3 or 4 recipes survived.

In the Savoy Cocktail Book we have Corpse Revivers No. 1 and No. 2.

In Duffy we have Corpse Revivers 1-3, with a slight variation in No. 2 which we'll cover in the next entry.

In European cocktail collections you will find another cocktail called the Corpse Reviver No. 2 (or sometimes No. 3). This drink is credited to Frank Meier of the Ritz in Paris and is identical to Hemingway's "Death in the Afternoon". A shot of Absinthe topped up with champagne. I've tried that cocktail, and it definitely is a way to build up a head of steam. Not sure about it as a brunch cocktail, unless you do plan to die in the afternoon.

The Corpse Reviver No. 1 is a perfectly fine and enjoyable cocktail. I did find it significantly improved with the addition of a drop or two of Angostura Bitters.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#492 J_Ozzy

J_Ozzy
  • participating member
  • 124 posts
  • Location:Montreal, Quebec

Posted 02 September 2007 - 02:26 PM

Wasn't sure about "Peppermint".  If that meant something like Peppermint extract or a liqueur.  Such a small amount, it probably doesn't make a whole lot of difference, whether extract or liqueur.

View Post


Marie Brizard makes a Peppermint Schnapps which might suit the purpose

#493 bostonapothecary

bostonapothecary
  • participating member
  • 1,235 posts
  • Location:have shaker will travel

Posted 03 September 2007 - 10:14 AM

Posted Image

Corpse Reviver (No. 1)


1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Apple Brandy or Calvados. (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/2 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

To be taken before 11 a.m., or whenever steam and energy are needed.



that is my kind of thing.... the season over here is slowly synchronizing with those flavors...
abstract expressionist beverage compounder
creator of acquired tastes
bostonapothecary.com

#494 thirtyoneknots

thirtyoneknots
  • participating member
  • 1,968 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 03 September 2007 - 07:43 PM

Posted Image

Corpse Reviver (No. 1)


1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)
1/4 Apple Brandy or Calvados. (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/2 Brandy. (1 1/2 oz Maison Surrenne Petite Champagne Cognac)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

To be taken before 11 a.m., or whenever steam and energy are needed.



that is my kind of thing.... the season over here is slowly synchronizing with those flavors...

View Post


Agreed, with a dash of bitters this looks like it would be positively wonderful.
Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

#495 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 04 September 2007 - 09:41 AM

Well, the Corpse Reviver No. 1 is no Vieux Carre or Cocktail a la Louisiane. Still a fine enough cocktail in its own right.

Posted Image

Corpse Reviver (No. 2)

1/4 Wine Glass Lemon Juice (3/4 oz Fresh Lemon Juice)
1/4 Wine Glass Kina Lillet. (3/4 oz Cocchi Aperitivo Americano)
1/4 Wine Glass Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Wine Glass Dry Gin. (3/4 oz Bombay Gin)
1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Note: Four of these taken in swift succession will unrevive the corpse again.


Ahem, well, going by the rules of a "Wine Glass" equaling 2 oz, I should have used 1/2 oz portions. However, the previous evenings celebrations had left this corpse badly in need of Revivifaction.

The Cocchi Aperitivo Americano is actually quite nice here, lending a bit more complexity than Lillet Blanc. So far I have yet to find a Savoy cocktail where I prefer using the modern Lillet to the Americano. On the other hand, the Americano was downright horrible in Pegu's White Negroni, a cocktail obviously created with the character of the modern Lillet in mind.

Bombay Gin is another new player. I've been wanting to give the regular Bombay a try for a while now, and now that I finished off the Boodles, I picked up a bottle. Not bad at all.

Patrick Gavin Duffy has a slight variation on the Corpse Reviver No. 2 in his "Official Mixer's Manual", which is sometimes reproduced in modern cocktail collections. In it he substitutes Swedish Punsch for the Lillet.

Posted Image

1/4 Dry Gin (3/4 oz Bombay Dry Gin)
1/4 Cointreau (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/4 Swedish Punch (3/4 oz Carlshamm's Flaggpunsch)
1/4 Lemon Juice (3/4 oz fresh lemon juice)
1 Dash Pernod (Dash Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)

Shake well with ice and strain into glass

This is tad bit sweeter than the Lillet based affair. The flavor of the Swedish Punsch really dominates the cocktail.

Both are really quite nice, mild cocktails. If I had to give either the nod, I'd say the Savoy no. 2 is slightly more well balanced.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#496 Nathan

Nathan
  • participating member
  • 4,260 posts

Posted 04 September 2007 - 11:11 AM

the Savoy version is one of my favorite cocktails of all time...although personally I think it balances best with the Lillet Blanc (I don't think you're really supposed to detect any of the individual agreements...the drink functions very well as a harmonious whole)

#497 Chris Amirault

Chris Amirault
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 19,622 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 04 September 2007 - 11:26 AM

I'm also a big CR2 fan, using the Savoy receipt, and agree with Nathan's point about not being able to distinguish any single ingredient. To that end, a heavy hand with the absinthe destroys this drink, as I've found out too many times. Best to think of that absinthe as the corpse's wraith: unnoticeable when subtle, but vengeful if revealed in full.
Chris Amirault
camirault@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics Signatory
Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

#498 jmfangio

jmfangio
  • participating member
  • 319 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 04 September 2007 - 01:08 PM

I've been waiting for you to get to the Corpse Reviver No. 2. It's a bit of a sentimental favorite - along with the Jasmine, it was one of the first cocktails to inspire me to move beyond martinis (thanks, Drinkboy!), and is a damn fine drink in its own right.

A local wine shop has a bottle of Cocchi gathering dust on a back shelf - I'll have to pick it up and give it a try in this.

The point I wanted to raise, though, is that this is the one pre-Prohibition cocktail where I actually prefer Pernod over absinthe. I think the sweeter anise tones work a bit better than the slightly more bitter tones of the absinthe. Of course, that may be a function of the absinthe I'm using (Verte de Fougerolles), but since that's the only one I know, I don't have any basis for comparison. I'd be curious to hear your thoughts if you try it again with Pernod.
"Martinis should always be stirred, not shaken, so that the molecules lie sensuously one on top of the other." - W. Somerset Maugham

#499 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 04 September 2007 - 02:40 PM

Well, I have to admit I have had scant success convincing others of the charms of the Cocchi Americano.

The usual response I get is, "tastes like vermouth."

Then folks kind of glaze over when I start going on about the subtle orange/cinnamon flavors and delightful bitter quinine notes in the late flavors.

It may be its particular combination of tastes just appeals particularly to me for some reason.

At least it isn't expensive...
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#500 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 06 September 2007 - 12:09 PM

Posted Image

Cota Cocktail

1/4 Hercules. (3/4 oz Cocchi Barolo Chinato)
1/4 Cointreau. (3/4 oz Cointreau)
1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Bombay Gin)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass.

The ingredient Hercules continues to confound.

Cocktaildb's ingredient database (and the Jones' Bar Guide) suggest it is an Absinthe substitute. However, making these cocktails with any modern Absinthe substitutes, they turn out to be rather horribly balanced. They are usually OK, if I reduce the Absinthe substitute to a dash.

Sometimes when I visit the Cocktaildb home page (and I do quite often) one of the random pictures that shows up is what appears to be a label or advertisement in dutch for something that appears to be called "Hercules".

Hercules Advert?

I don't know Dutch; but, the words like "Versterkende Bloedwijn" and "Kina Wijn" on the advertisement suggest it is for some sort of red wine based Quinquina.

Knowing that 3/4 oz Pastis, 3/4 oz Cointreau, and 1 1/2 oz Gin is going to be pretty undrinkable, I decided to experiment with a couple of the red wine Quinquinas I had around. The first try, with Byrrh Assemblage, was pretty lackluster.

Even though I suspect it is fairly unrelated to the intended Savoy "Cota Cocktail", the formula above, with the Barolo Chinato, was actually quite delicious. Similar to a slightly sweeter and orangier Negroni. Maybe call it the "Coda Cocktail"?

If anyone has any thoughts about a more appropriate Hercules substitution, please let me know.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#501 Mayur

Mayur
  • participating member
  • 590 posts

Posted 06 September 2007 - 06:16 PM

Well, I have to admit I have had scant success convincing others of the charms of the Cocchi Americano.

The usual response I get is, "tastes like vermouth."

Then folks kind of glaze over when I start going on about the subtle orange/cinnamon flavors and delightful bitter quinine notes in the late flavors.

It may be its particular combination of tastes just appeals particularly to me for some reason.

At least it isn't expensive...

View Post

No; I'm a big fan as well. Moreover, having made the CR2 with it, I'll never go back to straight Lillet. To be honest, dry vermouth + orange bitters (or better still, Noilly Ambre plus orange bitters) is simply a superior alternative to Lillet Blonde in every single cocktail I've played with using Lillet as an ingredient.

Incidentally, I don't think the Aperitivo Americano holds back the CR2 from achieving that proper balance. I *do* think that adding too much absinthe can mess this up right good. (I managed two drops from the VdF bottle before the mixing glass, shaker, and cocktail glass smelled like anise from about three paces.) I'm indifferent on Pernod vs. absinthe in this drink, although I think I do actually prefer the latter FWIW.
Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"

#502 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 06 September 2007 - 09:07 PM

Cool!

Well, at least, one other person in the world thinks the Cocchi Americano is an interesting ingredient.

I know I've tried to make CR2s before and not been particularly impressed.

However, I think, at the time, I may have increased the gin to other ingredients ratio.

It does seem like one of those cocktails that rewards careful measurement.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#503 Nathan

Nathan
  • participating member
  • 4,260 posts

Posted 07 September 2007 - 12:10 PM

Cool! 

Well, at least, one other person in the world thinks the Cocchi Americano is an interesting ingredient.

I know I've tried to make CR2s before and not been particularly impressed.

However, I think, at the time, I may have increased the gin to other ingredients ratio.

It does seem like one of those cocktails that rewards careful measurement.

View Post


oh gosh...whatever for!?

this drink only works with equal parts.

#504 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 07 September 2007 - 12:36 PM

Just me being dumb and adding more booze.

Interesting, though, when I was talking to a bartender about the Corpse Reviver No. 2, they were surprised to discover that the cocktail was equal parts. They said they had been using the CR2 recipe from Dale DeGroff's book.

I guess he tweaks it toward the tart and strong by increasing both the citrus and gin.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#505 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 10 September 2007 - 07:02 PM

Posted Image

Country Club Cooler
1 glass French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (Home made)
2 Lumps of ice.

Pour into tumbler and fill up with soda water.

Just didn't do much for me.

I suppose it is fine and all. Might be a refreshing drink on a hot day. Or one of the fancy vermouths, like the Vya, could perk things up.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#506 bostonapothecary

bostonapothecary
  • participating member
  • 1,235 posts
  • Location:have shaker will travel

Posted 10 September 2007 - 11:53 PM

Country Club Cooler
1 glass French Vermouth. (2 oz Noilly Prat Dry)
1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (Home made)
2 Lumps of ice.

Pour into tumbler and fill up with soda water.

Just didn't do much for me.



i drink that kind of thing while i'm working...
abstract expressionist beverage compounder
creator of acquired tastes
bostonapothecary.com

#507 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 11 September 2007 - 09:23 AM

Interestingly, in this month's Imbibe Magazine there's a big article on the bar scene in Milan and Torino in Italy, "Bitter is Bella".

Campari and Soda, Bianco Vermouth, Aperol Spritzer, etc. all those low alcohol alternatives are apparently very popular there.

Due to a ridiculous glut of bitters at home, if I'm not drinking, I usually go with a healthy dash of bitters, some simple, and citrus juice topped up with soda.

Serves dual function of keeping me sober and familiar with the flavor of the bitters.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#508 bostonapothecary

bostonapothecary
  • participating member
  • 1,235 posts
  • Location:have shaker will travel

Posted 11 September 2007 - 11:42 AM

Interestingly, in this month's Imbibe Magazine there's a big article on the bar scene in Milan and Torino in Italy, "Bitter is Bella".

Campari and Soda, Bianco Vermouth, Aperol Spritzer, etc. all those low alcohol alternatives are apparently very popular there.

Due to a ridiculous glut of bitters at home, if I'm not drinking, I usually go with a healthy dash of bitters, some simple, and citrus juice topped up with soda.

Serves dual function of keeping me sober and familiar with the flavor of the bitters.

View Post


i appreciate the article. it makes my drinking habits seem less crazy. i find demand on the other side of the counter exists for vermouths and amaros especially when you just give someone something to try and remove the financial risk of experimentaiton... on my side of the counter i can't get a single staff member into it. they pound redbulls.
abstract expressionist beverage compounder
creator of acquired tastes
bostonapothecary.com

#509 thirtyoneknots

thirtyoneknots
  • participating member
  • 1,968 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 12 September 2007 - 11:15 AM

Moderator Note: Merged from "Drinks" topic in response to this post: Millionaire from Cocktails of the Ritz

...

The recipe is as follows:

white of a fresh egg
2 dashes of Curacoa
1/6 gill of grenadine
2/6 gill of Rye

First off, I have no idea what a gill is and no clue how to measure it...

View Post


Herein perhaps lies a clue to The Big Question regarding the intended size of the recipes from the Savoy (?)
Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

#510 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 12 September 2007 - 11:33 AM

Herein perhaps lies a clue to The Big Question regarding the intended size of the recipes from the Savoy (?)

View Post

Regarding Gills, this post from a certain "Wondrich" over on DrinkBoy is informative:

Eddie Clarke's 1963 Shaking in the 60's

Note that Clarke's standard measure here is a so-called "6-out,"or 1/6 gill; this works out to 5/6 of an ounce, or--well, I'll let the brits here figure out how many ML that is.


Example recipe:

Spaceman
Pour into a mixing glass:
1 1/2 measures Vodka
1/2 measure dry Vermouth
dash of Grenadine
dash of Pernod
Stir and strain into a cocktail glass.


Most recipes a little more than 2 measures, or um, an ounce and a third, if my fractions are in order.

Unfortunately, given the motley origin of the Savoy Cocktail Book recipes, you can't assume every one is either the same size or uses the same measures.

But, in general, yes, the drinks were very small.

Edited by eje, 12 September 2007 - 11:37 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA