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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2006–2007)


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#91 eje

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Posted 29 October 2006 - 12:37 PM

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Apricot Coctail

1/4 Lemon Juice (3/4 oz Lemon Juice)
1/4 Orange Juice (3/4 oz Orange Juice)
1/2 Apricot Brandy (1 1/2 oz Vedrenne Liqueur de Abricot)
1 Dash Dry Gin (Beefeater's)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

I was afraid this mild proto-Fuzzy Navel would be too sweet. However, the lemon balances out the sweetness of the Apricot liqueur nicely and it ends up more sweet tart. Again, as in the Apple Jack Rabbit, the aromatic zing of fresh citrus juice makes this cocktail for me.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#92 eje

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 09:41 PM

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Artillery Cocktail

1/3 Italian Vermouth (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth)
2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Citadelle Gin)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass

Was trying to think of a way to raise this cocktail above average, so decided to open a couple bottles I've had sitting around.

The Carpano Antica is nice. Subtle, complex, and not as sweet as the Cinzano. Can't wait to try it in a Manhattan. The Citadelle seemed like it had a stronger Juniper component than either of the gins I usually mix with (Beefeater or Plymouth).

With interesting ingredients, it's not a bad cocktail. With cheap gin and generic vermouth, I doubt it would be very interesting.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#93 eje

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 10:21 PM

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Artist's (Special) Cocktail

1/3 Whisky (3/4 oz Sazerac Junior Rye)
1/3 Sherry (3/4 oz Lustau Solera Reserva Dry Oloroso Sherry "Don Nuño")
1/6 Lemon Juice (1/3-1/2 oz lime juice)
1/6 Groseille Syrup (bar spoon D'Arbo Red Currant Preserves)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

This is the genuine 'Ink of Inspiration' imbibed at the Bal Bullier, Paris.  The recipe is from the Artists' Club, Rue Pigalle, Paris.


Well, I've take quite a lot of liberties for this one. However, with such unspecific ingredients its hard to know where to start. First, the whisky is not specified. Second the type of Sherry is not specified. Third, I realized when I was looking through the refrigerator tonight, we were out of lemons. Fourth, I could find no Red Currant syrup.

But, the description is so inspiring, I had to give it a try.

The Saz Jr is my go-to rye for mixing, so I started there. Sometimes it is a little too assertive to play well with other ingredients. But there was enough going on here, I thought it might be interesting.

I didn't particularly care for the fino sherry I'd recently tried in my cobbler experiment, so I thought I'd get something a little richer. Didn't want a cream, though. Given the fairly meager local selection of sherry, the Lustau Dry Oloroso seemed like a good choice.

My wife has a cold and she used up all the lemons in her tea. Thank goodness, we still had regular limes. I don't think I could have lived with myself if I had been forced to substitute key limes or calamansi.

Apparently, Groseille syrup is red currant syrup. I can find no trace of it in the modern world. Black currant, yes, Red currant, no. Fortunately, you can still buy red currant preserves. What are preserves, but, thickened fruit syrup?

What's the verdict?

It's quite a tasty cocktail and well worth all that pondering. Everything is there; but, none of the ingredients are fighting. Rye, currants, citrus, and sherry complement each other. Who knew?
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#94 petite tête de chou

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 10:45 PM

Hi eje. It looks like Birchboy carries red currant syrup (half-way down the page).
Shelley: Would you like some pie?
Gordon: MASSIVE, MASSIVE QUANTITIES AND A GLASS OF WATER, SWEETHEART. MY SOCKS ARE ON FIRE.

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#95 eje

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 11:00 PM

Hi eje. It looks like Birchboy carries red currant syrup (half-way down the page).

View Post

Ya know, I did find that page. I was confused, though, as they said their currant syrup comes from a species native to North America. No idea if it is similar to the European red currant.

I was also a little leery, as it was on a page full of pancake syrups.

In any case, I was pleased with my solution, as it didn't involve mail order or shipping, just a trip to a local gourmet grocery store.

Also, I know d'Arbo products have really good, concentrated fruit flavor and no extraneous ingredients.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#96 eje

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:58 PM

re: Artillery Cocktail - Some sources (Duffy) add a dash Angostura (or Boker's) and a lemon twist to this cocktail, which would probably give a little more sparkle to the drink.

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Astoria Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Beefeater's)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat)
dash Orange Bitters (Regan's)
(Garnish with Olive per Duffy)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass

Yer basic Dry Martini. Interesting to note that the Astoria Cocktail in Crockett's "Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book" is composed of, 2/3 dry vermouth, 1/3 Old Tom Gin, and 2 Dashes of Orange Bitters. Guess it lost some weight crossing the Atlantic!
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#97 eje

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 10:13 PM

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Atta Boy Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat)
2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Citadelle Gin)
4 dashes Grenadine ( 2 barspoons homemade)

Shake welll and strain into cocktail glass

Here's another one I thought could have used a dash of lemon juice.

It was definitely interesting to compare the Beefeater and Citadelle gins back to back. The Citadelle definitely has more aggressive flavor profile and hotter taste. The Beefeater, while actually being higher proof, is a smoother gin.

When the Beefeater starts getting low, I might have to do some tastes against Tanqueray or another London Dry.

Idle question, what currently available gin in the US market might you think would be the most representative of those available in England in the early 20th century?
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#98 eje

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 12:45 AM

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ATTY Cocktail

1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Prat)
3 Dashes Absinthe (1/2 bar spoon Verte de Fougerolles)
3/4 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Citadelle Gin)
3 Dashes Creme de Violette (1/2 bar spoon Benoit Serres liqueur de violette)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Squeeze lemon peel on top - eje)

The first time I made this one using beefeaters and followed the cocktaildb recipe. I also measured the liqueur de violette at about 1 whole bar spoon. Cocktail didn't do much for me. The liqueur de violette was too dominant and the whole was too sweet. I went back to the Savoy and realized the cocktaildb had omitted the Absinthe and added a lemon twist (Duffy?).

I made it again as above with the Citadelle Gin, still getting the proportions slightly wrong. But, an extra 1/4 oz of dry vermouth isn't going to kill anyone. The cocktail is much improved. In fact, it is a fascinating, elegant and complex thing, with the hints of Absinthe and Violet trading each other for flavor dominance as you sip.

What it has to do with Attorneys is anyone's guess.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#99 eje

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Posted 09 November 2006 - 10:09 PM

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Aviation Cocktail

2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Various)
1/3 Lemon Juice (3/4 oz fresh lemon juice)
2 Dashes Maraschino (Luxardo)
(2 Dashes Benoit Serres Violet Liqueur)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with Cherry.)

I've always had a hard time with the Aviation! It's such a simple thing, you wouldn't think it would be hard to get right.

The first try was as above, Citadelle Gin and 1 bar spoon Luxardo Maraschino. Quite a dry, tart cocktail. I felt like it was OK; but, that the gin was lost and perhaps a stonger juniper element was necessary.

For the next try, I went with something like the Ensslin Aviation as discovered by Mr. Wondrich. 2 oz dry gin (Junipero), 1/2 oz Lemon, 1 tsp Maraschino, 1 tsp Violet Liqueur. The Junipero and the Violet liqueur clashed horribly. This was a terrible cocktail (no fault of discovered recipe).

I went back, re-read through the eGullet thread about the Aviation, and came to a compromise, "Alienation" as Lan4Dawg puts it. 1 1/2 oz Tanqueray, 3/4 oz fresh Lemon, 2 tsp Maraschino liqueur, and 1 tsp Violet Liqueur.

I think it is still tart enough to qualify as an Aviation rather than Allen and also probably tarter than any Aviation I've had made for me in a bar.

It is interesting, as even a teaspoon is pretty generous for "2 dashes". Makes you wonder how sour the original Aviation was.

Extra points for anyone who now has Elvis Costello lyrics running throug their head.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#100 slkinsey

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 09:45 AM

It is interesting, as even a teaspoon is pretty generous for "2 dashes".  Makes you wonder how sour the original Aviation was.

It's always hard to know exactly what they meant by "dash" in those old books. Clearly two dashes from a dasher bottle such as those used for bitters would be a minimal amount. On the other hand, a quick dash from an open bottle of maraschino liqueur could easily amount to a half teaspoon or more.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#101 Bricktop

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 10:42 AM

Some might say a Perfect Rob Roy.

Although my guess is that the proportions of the vermouths to the Scotch really would make this an entirely different drink.

I love Scotch -- it used to be my drink of choice before I discovered cocktails. But I hardly ever drink it these days, because I find it doesn't lend itself to cocktails. Nice to hear of a drink that uses it successfully.

View Post

I made myself a variation of the Affinity last night, 2 scotch, half each dry and sweet vermouth and some orange bitters, which I thought was more like a perfect Rob Roy. (That's what I called it in fact in the other thread.) I guess I didn't really trust the traditional proportions of a third-third-third, but tonight I will give that a go. I have a bottle of Compass Box Orangerie which might be fun in here, and I will skip the bitters.

#102 eje

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 03:09 PM

46 cocktails into the Savoy Cocktail book, we’ve finished with the letter “A”.

Of those cocktails, I thought the following were outstanding: Affinity, Alice Mine, Artist's (Special), Astoria, ATTY, and, of course, Aviation.

There were a surprising number that fell into the very good category. I'd say at least 15 or so, including the Alfonso, Allen, American Beauty, and all the "Apple" Cocktails.

Of the “dessert” cocktails I thought the After Supper was the tastiest.

To my taste, the only spit-out awful cocktail was the pousse café style Angel's Kiss. Perhaps I should have had a cup of coffee to go with it.

In regards the Aviation with or without violet liqueur, I’m not sure where I come down on that issue. It definitely adds an ethereal floral complexity to the drink. But, unlike both the Absinthe and violet liqueur in the ATTY, I don’t know if I think it is essential. Also, as an ingredient, it is one of those which must be handled carefully. Too much, or even the wrong Gin, and its bitter side starts to show itself.

I hope you have so far enjoyed our journey through the Savoy. The “Bs” look quite exciting, with star cocktails like the Bronx and Brooklyn to look forward to. For some inexplicable reason, the Bass Wyatt is the cocktail which has really caught my eye.

On to the Babbie's Special...
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#103 Liz Johnson

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 03:22 PM

Thanks eje — it's been fun to watch. Keep it up!
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#104 ThinkingBartender

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 03:59 PM

Erik: When do you envisage reaching the last cocktail in the Savoy Cocktail Book?

Perhaps you should write a companion to the SCB; a reader or something like that.

#105 Bricktop

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 04:00 PM

This is great thread, eje. You write beautifully, and I love your comments on using the different brands of spirits.

#106 eje

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 05:16 PM

I made myself a variation of the Affinity last night, 2 scotch, half each dry and sweet vermouth and some orange bitters, which I thought was more like a perfect Rob Roy. (That's what I called it in fact in the other thread.)  I guess I didn't really trust the traditional proportions of a third-third-third, but tonight I will give that a go.  I have a bottle of Compass Box Orangerie which might be fun in here, and I will skip the bitters.

View Post

Bricktop,

Do you consider the Orangerie a liqueur? I haven't tried it and can't quite tell from the press materials and reviews whether it is sweetened or just flavored.

Would you use all Oragerie or a mix of Orangerie and other Scotch?

I'll be curious to see what you think of the traditional Affinity with or without the Orange.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#107 Bricktop

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 06:54 PM

Erik, I really don't consider the Orangerie a liqueur, certainly more of a spirit. The bottle says it is "infused with tiny shavings of fresh orange peel and spices". The orange is VERY subtle straight, and was completely lost in the Affinity. A waste of the Orangerie's attributes to have used it this way, IMO. You live, you learn.

A dash of Fee's Orange Bitters livened up the drink, but I think the Affinity in the "traditional" proportions needs a very aggressive scotch to balance the vermouths. My preferred ratio (at least using Chivas) is the 4:1:1 I used for the Perfect Rob Roy.

#108 eje

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Posted 11 November 2006 - 11:07 PM

Erik, I really don't consider the Orangerie a liqueur, certainly more of a spirit.  The bottle says it is "infused with tiny shavings of fresh orange peel and spices".  The orange is VERY subtle straight, and was completely lost in the Affinity.  A waste of the Orangerie's attributes to have used it this way, IMO.  You live, you learn.

A dash of Fee's Orange Bitters livened up the drink, but I think the Affinity in the "traditional" proportions needs a very aggressive scotch to balance the vermouths.  My preferred ratio (at least using Chivas) is the 4:1:1 I used for the Perfect Rob Roy.

View Post

Bummer...

I don't really think of the Compass Box Asyla as an "aggressive" whiskey, at least compared to the bourbons and ryes I enjoy. I can't compare it to Chivas, though, so I don't have an opinion there.

I do think the Asyla works well in the cocktails I've tried it in so far. It's got a briny-savory element that I find particularly fascinating.

But, yeah, you gotta balance your cocktails to what you're working with.

My general starting place for manhattans is 2 oz of whiskey, 2 dashes of bitters, and 1/2 oz of sweet vermouth. However, I have a bottle of Binny's barrel select Buffalo Trace Bourbon which is very strongly flavored. I don't even really enjoy it straight. But, at 1 1/2 oz bourbon, 1/2 oz sweet vermouth, 1/2 oz dry vermouth, 2 dashes bitters, it makes a fine Manhattan. It doesn't really taste like any other Manhattan I make; but, it's a good cocktail.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#109 eje

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 08:22 PM

B is for Beligerent.

I apologize for the alphabetical delay. Taking a brief break from the tyranny of the Savoy.

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Babbie's Special Cocktail

1 dash Gin (1/4 oz Beefeater's)
1/3 Sweet Cream (3/4 oz Half and Half)
2/3 Apricot Brandy (1 1/2 oz Vedrenne Liqueur de Abricot)

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass

I hope Babbie was special for some other reason than her taste in cocktails. Beautiful? Rich? Found the drink much improved with a dash of peach bitters and a garnish of freshly ground nutmeg. Still, not something I ever would order.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#110 eje

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Posted 29 November 2006 - 08:30 PM

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Bacardi Special Cocktail*

1 teaspoonful Grenadine (homemade)
1/3 Burrough's Beefeater Gin (1 oz Beefeater)
2/3 Bacardi Rum (2 oz Flor de Cana Extra Dry)
The Juice of 1/2 lime

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass

*Made famous by Karl K. Kitchen, the well-known New York Newspaper Columnist


Huh, this is tastier than it really has any business being. A bit like Harrington's Jasmine. Light and tart. Very similar to a glass of alcoholic grapefruit juice.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#111 eje

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Posted 30 November 2006 - 09:20 PM

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Balm Cocktail (6 People)

1/2 Glass Orange Juice (1/2 oz fresh squeezed)
1/2 Glass Cointreau (1/2 oz)
3 Glasses Sherry (3 oz Lustau Don Nuno Dry Oloroso)
1 Dash Orange Bitters (Regan's)
2 Dashes Pimento Dram Liqueur (Homemade)

Fill up the shaker with cracked ice, shake and serve with an olive.

The olive garnish doesn't make any sense to me. Also not sure if this is the appropriate Sherry. But, I just don't really like dry fino sherry.

In any case, this isn't a bad cocktail, if you like orange, spice, and sherry. Just isn't quite as short and sharp as a liquor based cocktail.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#112 tkd7

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 07:31 AM

eje,
I just started through this thread and it is amazaing. Keep up the great writing!

#113 eje

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Posted 02 December 2006 - 11:53 AM

tdk7, thanks for the kind words!

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Barbara Cocktail

1/4 Fresh Cream (1/2 oz Half and Half)
1/4 Creme de Cacao (1/2 oz Bols)
1/2 Vodka (1 oz Rain Vodka)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with sprinkling of cacao powder - eje)

This Alexander variation may be the only use of Vodka in the Savoy Cocktail book. I admit, I prefer the Brandy version.

BTW, if anyone has advice on better brands of white creme de cacao, please let me know. The Bols (US) isn't bad; but, not the greatest, either. Not a very intense chocolate flavor. I suspect these cocktails would be better with a more full flavored liqueur.

edit - Found two more Vodka cocktails in the Savoy by cross referencing from Duffy's "Mixer's Manual", the Blue Monday and Russian. Duffy also gives an alternate name for the Barbara, the "Russian Bear".

Edited by eje, 02 December 2006 - 12:25 PM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#114 eje

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Posted 03 December 2006 - 12:12 PM

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The Barbary Coast Cocktail

1/4 Gin (1 oz Beefeater's)
1/4 Scotch Whisky (1 oz Compass Box Asyla)
1/4 Creme de Cacao (1 oz Bols)
1/4 Cream (1 oz Half and Half)
Cracked Ice

Serve in a highball glass. (Fill highball glass with crushed ice, build ingredients in glass, stir until outside of glass frosts over. -eje)

Most other cocktail books seem to either make the Barbary Coast as a shaken "up" cocktail (1/2 oz each ingredient) or as a highball (2oz whiskey, 1/2 oz rest, built over ice, topped with soda).

However, since this is one of the few Savoy cocktails that doesn't include the instruction, "Shake well and strain into cocktail glass," I'm pretty sure that wasn't intended. There is also no mention of soda. I decided to treat it as a "swizzle".

As an aside, with many of the cream cocktails, I'm afraid I must admit the routine is, mix, snap, sip, dump. They're usually too sweet and my doctor has told me to avoid dairy. For what it is worth, against my own best interests, I finished this one.

Also, based on the assumption that this cocktail is named after the San Francisco's Gold Rush era Barbary Coast neighborhood, I will include the following quote, from Benjamin Estelle Lloyd, writing in 1876:

The Barbary Coast is the haunt of the low and the vile of every kind. The petty thief, the house burglar, the tramp, the whoremonger, lewd women, cutthroats, murderers, all are found here. Dance-halls and concert-saloons, where blear-eyed men and faded women drink vile liquor, smoke offensive tobacco, engage in vulgar conduct, sing obscene songs and say and do everything to heap upon themselves more degradation, are numerous. Low gambling houses, thronged with riot-loving rowdies, in all stages of intoxication, are there. Opium dens, where heathen Chinese and God-forsaken men and women are sprawled in miscellaneous confusion, disgustingly drowsy or completely overcome, are there. Licentiousness, debauchery, pollution, loathsome disease, insanity from dissipation, misery, poverty, wealth, profanity, blasphemy, and death, are there. And Hell, yawning to receive the putrid mass, is there also.


---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#115 eje

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 10:10 PM

Posted Image

Barney Barnato Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters
1 Dash Curacao (1 barspoon Marie Brizard Curacao)
1/2 Caperitif (1 1/2 oz Lillet Blanc)
1/2 Brandy (1 1/2 oz Germain-Robin Fine Alembic Brandy)

Stir well and strain into cocktail glass.

Sometimes you get nothing when researching cocktails, and sometimes it feels like you've stepped into the deep end.

Barney Barnato was born Barnett Isaacs in the Whitechapel neighborhood of London in 1852. His father was a shop keeper on Petticoat Lane. He was a comedian, boxer, and probably a huckster. After hearing how well some of his relatives had done in South African "Diamond Rush", he followed them there, with naught but a box of cigars. Somehow he was able to prosper, and went on to found one of the two largest diamond mining firms in the history of that country. Due to some faulty business decisions, after a long struggle, in 1888 he was forced to allow his main competitor to buy him out. The check written to him at that time, for some £5,338,650, was the single largest check written up to that time in human history. The company, part of which he founded, went on to become De Beers. He operated in politics, for a while; but, events got ahead of him, and he left the country in 1897, shortly before the start of the Anglo-Boer war. He died as a result of falling from, being thrown from, or throwing himself from, the ship on the way back to England. Opinions differ.

The problem with this cocktail is "Caperitif". The coctaildb ingredient database describes it as, "Defunct proprietary South African sweet deep golden quinquina from Capetown - along the lines of Lillet blanc." Fortunately, the recent resurgence of the Vesper should make Lillet blanc an easy commodity to come by in most bars. Many cocktail receipts suggest Dubonnet for this. I guess, unlike most recipes, in this case, they probably mean Dubonnet blanc.

The Barney Barnato cocktail, itself, is a fairly subtle and sophisticated affair. A bit sweet, a little bitter, a little orange. None of the elements really dominate. Very nice.

One last point, the Tiffany Diamond was likely discovered in a mine owned by Barnato in 1877 or 1878. I think there is a striking resemblance between the color of this drink and the color of that most impressive gem.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#116 johnder

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Posted 07 December 2006 - 10:23 PM

BTW, if anyone has advice on better brands of white creme de cacao, please let me know.  The Bols (US) isn't bad; but, not the greatest, either.  Not a very intense chocolate flavor.  I suspect these cocktails would be better with a more full flavored liqueur.


If you can find the Brizzard cacao you should pick it up. I have tried the Bols, H. Walker and Brizzard and the MB is by far the best of the 3 I think.
John Deragon

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#117 eje

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 01:58 PM

re: Brizard Creme de Cacao. Thanks John, I'll have to keep a look out for it.

Posted Image

Baron Cocktail

6 Dashes Curacao (3 Barspoons Brizard Orange Curacao)
2 Dashes Italian Vermouth (1 Barspoon Carpano Antica)
1/3 French Vermouth (3/4 Ounce Noilly Prat Dry)
2/3 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Tanqueray)

Shake well (stir - eje) and strain into cocktail glass.

Couple dashes of Regan's orange Bitters livened this up a bit. Still nothing earth shaking. Slightly sweet and orangey Martini.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#118 eje

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 02:09 PM

Posted Image

Barton Special Cocktail*

1/4 Calvados or Apple Brandy (3/4 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)
1/4 Scotch Whisky (3/4 oz Compass Box Asyla)
1/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir - eje) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Garnish with lemon twist - cocktaildb).

*What has Bruce Barton got to do with this?


Bruce Barton was an inspirational writer, Christian, Republican, Politician, and Madison Avenue Adman. His most famous creation was Betty Crocker. He also worked on high profile ad campaigns for General Electric and General Motors. I'm guessing the above smart remark above was made before it was revealed he had had an affair with a female co-worker and she was blackmailing him. Instead of giving in to her demands, (a second time,) he turned her in to the police.

In any case, if Barton did enjoy a Barton Special now and then, he certainly didn't like anything getting between booze and his stomach.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#119 JAZ

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Posted 09 December 2006 - 05:49 PM

re: Brizard Creme de Cacao.  Thanks John, I'll have to keep a look out for it.

Erik, I saw MB Creme de Cacao at John Walker not too long ago.

#120 BTR

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Posted 10 December 2006 - 01:25 AM

But what did you think of the Barton Special? Or should we assume that when no commentary is given, the commentary is an implicit "meh"?