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Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2006–2007)


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#31 eje

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 09:18 AM

Posted Image

Absinthe Cocktail

1/2 Absinthe (1 1/2 oz Absinthe Verte de Fougerolles)
1/2 Water (1 1/2 oz Water)
1 dash Syrup (Rich Simple Syrup)
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Absinthe (Special) Cocktail

2/3 Absinthe (1 oz Absinthe Vert de Fougerolles)
1/6 Gin (1/4 oz Beefeater Gin)
1/6 Syrup of Anisette or Gomme Syrup (barspoon Rich Simple Syrup)
1 dash Orange Bitters
1 dash Angostura Bitters

Instructions for both are, "Shake Well and Strain into a Cocktail Glass".

The Special is on the left.

With the real Absinthe I preferred the plain Absinthe Cocktail to the Special. It is pretty much just really cold Absinthe, though. With Bardouin Pastis, I preferred the Special.

Woo! Finally finished the first two pages! Off to Alaska to Allies next, with a possible detour to Nome.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#32 eje

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 06:09 PM

This is the edition of the Savoy, I am working from.

Posted Image

It's a very handsome book, with color illustrations like the following on most pages. Often the illustrations will mirror one of the recipes on the page. For example, there is a plane on the two pages which contain the Aviation.

Posted Image

The recipes/receipts are from The American Bar at the Savoy Hotel in London. Harry Craddock, an expat American, was the head bartender when the book was first published in 1930.

It is my understanding "The Savoy Cocktail Book" was one of the first cocktail books published in the US after the repeal of prohibition and thus holds an influential place in the history of the American Bar.

The current edition is a reproduction of the edition which was published in the 60s. In that edition, they changed the recipes/receipts from using 10ths as a standard unit of measurement to a fractional notation based on halves, thirds, quarters, etc.

If anyone knows more about the history of the book or Mr. Craddock, it would be great to hear.

A FEW HINTS FOR THE YOUNG MIXER

1.  Ice is nearly always an absolute essential for any Cocktail.
2.  Never use the same ice twice.
3.  Remember that the ingredients mix better in a shaker rather larger than is necessary to contain them.
4.  Shake the shaker hard as you can : don't just rock it : you are trying to wake it up, not send it to sleep!
5.  If possible, ice your glasses before using them.
6.  Drink your Cocktail as soon as possible.  Harry Craddock was once asked what was the best way to drink a Cocktail : "Quickly," replied that great man, "while it is laughing at you!"


---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#33 evilhomer

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Posted 08 July 2006 - 06:58 PM

Affinity

1/3 French Vermouth
1/3 Italian Vermouth
1/3 Scotch
2 dashes Angostura bitters

Stir well and strain into a cocktail glass.  Squeeze lemon peel on top.

Posted Image

I did remember to stir this one to chill, and a fine, fine cocktail it is.  I'm not normally a big scotch guy, but, here it is quite nice.  With the vermouth and bitters both tempering and accenting the briny and savory notes of the whisky.

View Post



This is a fine cocktail - we've been making more and more cocktails at home over the past two years (it's amazing what a difference a jigger makes - it seemed a fairly useless housewarming gift at the time). Anyways - the scotch of choice was Te Bheag which is a nice blend, both vermouths from martini rossi, angostura, stirred and strained and WOW - more than anything in recent memory, this drink defines balance, you taste everything individually and collectively. I'm loving the refined character of many of these Savoy cocktails you're posting up, keep at it.
"There never was an apple, according to Adam, that wasn't worth the trouble you got into for eating it"
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#34 eje

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 08:36 PM

Thanks for the encouragement evilhomer!

I agree, the Affinity is a real winner, even not really being a scotch fancier.

The next up is the Alaska Cocktail.

Posted Image

3/4 Gin (1 1/2 oz Beefeaters)
1/4 Yellow chartreuse (3/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse)

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

So far as can be ascertained this delectable potion is NOT the staple diet of the Esquimaux.  It was probably first thought of in South Carolina -- hence its name


Sadly, you will note that I got the proportions somewhat wrong.

The side trip on this journey was what David Embury called the "Nome". Whose proportions are dictated by, "It can be greatly improved by using less chartreuse and adding 1 to 2 parts dry sherry. This is the NOME."

2/3 gin (1 1/2 oz Beefeaters)
1/6 Yellow Chartreuse
1/6 Dry Sherry

Stir.

In any case, especially after adding some optional orange bitters per cocktaildb, we preferred the original badly measured formulation and didn't find Embury's embelishment an improvement. Though, I do think this drink should be properly made by stirring, not shaking.

Edited by eje, 13 July 2006 - 09:28 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#35 johnder

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 07:51 AM

I agree with you on the stirring vs. shaking. I have always believed that a drink should be shaken only if it has citrus generally. Surely there are exceptions, but for me citrus = shake. no citrus = stir.

john
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#36 birder53

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 08:39 AM

The next up is the Alaska Cocktail.

3/4 Gin (1 1/2 oz Beefeaters)
1/4 Yellow chartreuse (3/4 oz Yellow Chartreuse)

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

Sadly, you will note that I got the proportions somewhat wrong.


We tried this based upon the recipe in Trader Vic's Bartender's Guide. It called for

1/1/2 oz gin
1/2 oz yellow Chartreuse
2 dashes orange bitters

Stir with cracked ice; strain into chilled cocktail glass; twist lemon peel over top and serve.

The Chartreuse overwhelmed the drink and we put a little note next to the recipe so we wouldn't bother making it again.
KathyM

#37 eje

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 09:05 AM

[...]
The Chartreuse overwhelmed the drink and we put a little note next to the recipe so we wouldn't bother making it again.

View Post

Really? Especially after adding the bitters, we found it a pleasant drink, even made with more Yellow Chartreuse than the Trader Vic's recipe. Herbaceous and just a touch sweet. Certainly, the Chartreuse is the dominant element.

I will try a drier version of the Nome some time (1 1/2 oz gin, 1/4 oz chartreuse, 1/4 oz dry sherry) and see if it is more to my liking.

I think Embury's version of the Alaska is even drier than that. I'll have to look when I get home. His method of measuring by "parts" gives me even bigger headaches than the fractions the Savoy uses.
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Erik Ellestad
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#38 birder53

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 06:00 AM

The choice of gin might have played a part in our reaction to the Alaska. We used Plymouth. Maybe a more junipery gin would be a better choice. The Beefeaters probably balanced the drink better than Plymouth.
KathyM

#39 JAZ

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 05:57 PM

Affinity

1/3 French Vermouth
1/3 Italian Vermouth
1/3 Scotch
2 dashes Angostura bitters

Stir well and strain into a cocktail glass.  Squeeze lemon peel on top.

I did remember to stir this one to chill, and a fine, fine cocktail it is.  I'm not normally a big scotch guy, but, here it is quite nice.  With the vermouth and bitters both tempering and accenting the briny and savory notes of the whisky.

View Post

This is a fine cocktail - we've been making more and more cocktails at home over the past two years (it's amazing what a difference a jigger makes - it seemed a fairly useless housewarming gift at the time). Anyways - the scotch of choice was Te Bheag which is a nice blend, both vermouths from martini rossi, angostura, stirred and strained and WOW - more than anything in recent memory, this drink defines balance, you taste everything individually and collectively. I'm loving the refined character of many of these Savoy cocktails you're posting up, keep at it.

View Post

I just tried this and agree completely -- it's the best Scotch cocktail I've ever tried, very well balanced. It'll definitely go into my rotation.

#40 eje

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 06:59 PM

Embury's recipe for the Alaska is one part yellow chartreuse to 5-7 parts gin. Basically the same ratio as his "ideal" martini. That's too much fuzzy math for me to do the ounce conversion. A little more than a Quarter ounce chartreuse to 2 oz gin, maybe?

The next cocktail is the first of what I'll call the "party" cocktails. I guess these are designed to be made in quantity and drunk with a group of guests. This one seems to be a dessert cocktail. Most of these use the "glass" measure. I'm going with 2 oz per glass.

Posted Image

Albertine Cocktail (Six People)

2 glasses Kirsch (1 oz kirsch)
2 glasses Cointreau (1 oz Cointreau)
2 glasses Chartreuse (1 oz Yellow Chartreuse, per cocktaildb)
A few drops Maraschino

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Fortunately, this one was easy to quarter. And I think the size is about right for 3 as an after dinner cocktail. Complex and more palatable than I imagined. Still very sweet! I found it much improved with a squeeze of orange peel over the top.

Edited by eje, 15 July 2006 - 10:30 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#41 eje

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 07:49 PM

Though, after the addition of the squeeze of orange peel to the Albertine, my wife compared the flavor to that of a chewable vitamin. YMMV.

I wonder if it should be green chartreuse? That would make it awfully high test, for an after dinner cocktail and also push the flavor far more in the herbaceous direction.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#42 slkinsey

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 05:29 AM

I would say that any recipe calling for simply "Chartreuse" is talking about the green variety.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#43 eje

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 09:11 AM

I would say that any recipe calling for simply "Chartreuse" is talking about the green variety.

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Sam,

That was my initial thought, too. However, when I looked for Albertine recipes which actually specified, the ones I found called for the yellow variety, so I went with that. I've since found a couple versions that call for the green.

I dunno if it seems appealing enough to try it again with the green. Maybe if I replaced some of the volume of liqueur with vodka.

Edited by eje, 15 July 2006 - 10:33 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
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#44 eje

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 10:42 PM

Posted Image

Alexander Cocktail (No. 2)

1/3 Creme de Cacao (1/2 oz)
1/3 Brandy (1 oz)
1/3 Fresh Cream (1/2 oz)

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

I accidentally made the brandy version of the cocktail with the proportions of the (Gin) Alexander Cocktail (No. 1).

I don't mind this version, actually. Brandy-choco-licious. There's no way to get around the fact that it is a fairly sweet drink, but shaking it really well gives it a nice light foamy texture. I think original proportions above would be a little too sweet for me.

In any case, I'm off for a little vacation in the Brandy Belt, so I thought I'd do this version first. I do seem to recall the Brandy Alexander being a blended or ice cream drink when I was growing up in the midwest, though.

Edited by eje, 18 July 2006 - 11:44 PM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#45 eje

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 08:11 PM

Until today, it's really been too hot to countenance either of these Cocktails. Fortunately or unfortunately, the fog has finally rolled back in tonight and Alexander gets his day in the sun.

Posted Image

Alexander Cocktail (No. 1)

1/2 Dry Gin (1 1/2 oz Beefeater's Gin)
1/4 Creme de Cacao
1/4 Sweet Cream

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Posted Image

Alexander's Sister Cocktail

1/3 Dry Gin (1 oz Beefeater's Gin)
1/3 Creme de Menthe
1/3 Sweet Cream

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Ladies are advised to avoid this cocktail as often as possible


Well, and anyone else for that matter. I was really dreading the Alexander Cocktails, and I have to say I didn't enjoy them all that much. I liked No. 2 the best. Garnished with a light sprinkling of cacao powder, No. 1 wasn't too bad. However, I can't really imagine ordering any of them at any point in the near future. Still, I did find them inspiring enough to think up my own variation. Still needs a bit of tweaking; but, it's not bad in an, "ooops, I just drank the Christmas Potpourri," kind of way.

Alexander's Jamaican Cousin

1/2 Flavorful Rum
1/4 Pimento Dram (Allspice liqueur)
1/4 Sweet Cream

Edited by eje, 10 August 2006 - 08:13 PM.

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Erik Ellestad
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Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#46 Martin Doudoroff

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Posted 10 August 2006 - 09:08 PM

Quite a project you've undertaken, here. I have no intention of joining you, but I'll try to keep an eye on your reports. A couple tips:

The Savoy is one of the most prominent, early examples of "shovelware" cocktail books. These recipes are seldom fine-tuned or refined. It's quantity, not quality. The point was to produce a big cocktail recipe book for the English market, and the bulk of the book is recipes copied wholesale (accurately or not--for example, the Aviation recipe in Craddock omits the violet liqueur that made the original drink both more interesting and also gave it a hue that was more pertinent to its name) from an assortment of other sources Craddock had from his pre-prohibition days in the USA. Bottom line:
- many recipes are essentially identical except for name or some trivial detail
- many of these recipes will be terrible if you make them verbatim
- many will be terrible no matter what you try
- many can become sublime if carefully balanced; experiment

Absinthe cocktails: all the qualifiers above apply doubly to the absinthe-intensive cocktails in Craddock. I suggest you order a bottle of Absinthe Edouard from Jade Liqueurs. I doubt you will regret it. I do not recommend any Czech absinthe. I do not recommend "La Fee Vert" brand absinthe. Should you become entranced with the Edouard, I recommend you talk to the Wormwood Society. I recommend not adding sweeteners to absinthe drinks (or absinthe itself) until you've verified it's needed. Absinthe is a liqueur, and the good stuff is already pretty sweet. If you have a crazy sweet tooth (like many 19th Century French apparently did) sweeten to taste. Also note that many recipes published in the 20th Century really mean "pastis" when they say "absinthe". It's always nice to have the real thing, although it won't often make or break a drink. Of all pastis, I recommend Herbsaint and 51 most highly.

#47 eje

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Posted 11 August 2006 - 08:25 AM

Quite a project you've undertaken, here. I have no intention of joining you, but I'll try to keep an eye on your reports. A couple tips:
[...]

View Post

Martin,

Thanks for the suggestions and input!

Yes, it is a daunting task. I believe there are something like 750 recipes/receipts in the book. At least it isn't 1001 Cocktails or similar!

For the aromatic or sour based cocktails, I do try to do a bit of cross checking about the recipes before making them, then tweak them a time or two if they don't pass muster. On the other hand, if they are dessert cocktails, (which don't really appeal to me,) like the Alexanders, I just make them as written.

The Jade Absinthes were a bit pricey for me to justify as a first purchase. However, I wanted to get a full proof Absinthe, so went with the Verte de Fougerolles. I'm enjoying it and am glad I got a "real" Absinthe to play with.

BTW, I convinced some visiting friends to tote some Liqueur de Violette for me and will definitely be comparing Hugo Ensslin's 1916 Aviation recipe (Wondrich) with the one in the Savoy.

edit spelling and grammar.

Edited by eje, 12 August 2006 - 04:10 PM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#48 eje

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Posted 13 August 2006 - 10:22 AM

Posted Image

The Alfonso Cocktail

Put 1 lump of sugar in a medium sized wine-glass, 2 dashes of Secrestat Bitter poured on to the sugar, 1 lump of ice, 1/4 of a glass of dubonnet, fill remainder with Champagne, squeeze lemon peel on top and stir slightly.

I substituted Angostura for the defunct Secrestat bitters. If anyone knows of a more appropriate substitution, let me know.

Both my wife and I quite enjoyed this cocktail. It's a light aromatic aperitif and the champagne makes it a bit festive. Be quite nice for the opening salvo to accompany appetizers at a dinner party.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#49 eje

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 11:25 AM

Posted Image

Alfonso (Special) Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters (generous)
4 Dashes Italian Vermouth (2 teaspoons)
1/4 Dry Gin (3/4 oz Beefeaters)
1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Pratt)
1/2 Grand Marnier (1 1/2 oz Gran Gala)

Shake well (I stirred, instead. - eje) and strain into a cocktail glass.

---

I'm not sure what the Alfonso (Special) has to do with the preceding Alfonso, as it is, more or less, a Satan's Whiskers Cocktail with inverted proportions. It is nice looking; but, I didn't find it all that interesting. By the time I got to the bottom, I was tired of it.

Edited by eje, 19 August 2006 - 11:48 AM.

---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#50 eje

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 11:42 AM

Posted Image

Alice Mine Cocktail

1/2 Italian Vermouth (1 oz Cinzano Rosso)
1/2 Russian Kummel (1 oz Linie Aquavit, 1 barpoon rich simple syrup)
2 Dashes Scotch Whiskey (1 barspoon Compass Box Asyla)

Shake well (I stirred - eje) and strain into a cocktail glass.

---

When I was researching this one, I came across some oddities. First, the recipe is often given as using the exact same ingredients as the preceding Alfonso (Special). I found this to be the case in Duffy's "Official Mixer's Manual". In other cases, it is just a Rob Roy with slightly different proportions.

While I don't know how close I am to replicating kummel by mixing Aquavit with rich simple syrup, it's too bad this version of the Alice Mine appears to be the least common. Where I regretted making the Alfonso Special so large, I regretted making this one so small. The vermouth, caraway, and scotch are a complex and amazing combination.

edit - BTW, I wasn't sure what to garnish this one with. After trying it, floating a thin slice of cucumber might be nice. I think I'd stay away from citrus.

Edited by eje, 19 August 2006 - 11:48 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#51 Martin Doudoroff

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 01:23 PM

I don't know how close I am to replicating kummel by mixing Aquavit with rich simple syrup

Kummel is probably a little stronger flavored than your Aquavit/sugar combo.

BTW, I wasn't sure what to garnish this one with.

This drink might not need a garnish, especially with such a nice glass.

#52 ThinkingBartender

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 01:27 PM

Erik,

I must say that I am certainly enjoying reading this thread. It is good to see the recipes from the Savoy Cocktail Book being made. Not really a book I reach for personally.

Is Linie Akevitt really that similar to Kummel? I have never tried them side by side, but I don't recollect them tasting that similar.


George

#53 JAZ

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 01:35 PM

Alfonso (Special) Cocktail

1 Dash Angostura Bitters (generous)
4 Dashes Italian Vermouth (2 teaspoons)
1/4 Dry Gin (3/4 oz Beefeaters)
1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Pratt)
1/2 Grand Marnier (1 1/2 oz Gran Gala)

Shake well (I stirred, instead. - eje) and strain into a cocktail glass.

---

I'm not sure what the Alfonso (Special) has to do with the preceding Alfonso, as it is, more or less, a Satan's Whiskers Cocktail with inverted proportions.  It is nice looking; but, I didn't find it all that interesting.  By the time I got to the bottom, I was tired of it.

View Post


Interesting. I've been making the Alfonso Special recipe from Cocktaildb, which has the same ingredients but with different proportions:

1 oz. gin
1 oz. dry vermouth
1/4 oz sweet vermouth
1/2 oz. Grand Marnier
Dash bitters

Although now that I re-read the recipe, I realize that I've been making it with triple sec instead of the Grand Marnier, so it's less sweet. It's not my favorite cocktail, but I like it. The Savoy version sounds as if it would be unbearable sweet.

#54 eje

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 03:19 PM

Erik,

I must say that I am certainly enjoying reading this thread. It is good to see the recipes from the Savoy Cocktail Book being made. Not really a book I reach for personally.

Is Linie Akevitt really that similar to Kummel? I have never tried them side by side, but I don't recollect them tasting that similar.


George

View Post

Hi George,

I'm not sure how close they are. I wish there was somewhere I could go and ask for a small taste of Kummel! I know they are both caraway flavored, one is a liquor and one is a liqueur, and there are only so many bottles of obscure liquors and liqueurs I can clutter the house with before I start to question my own sanity.

I would guess Kummel is sweeter and less complex than my 1 oz of Aquavit plus 1 barspoon rich simple syrup. But after the Alfonso Special on Thursday, I was getting kind of tired of dessert drinks. I was quite pleased with the drink as is, even though it might not be exactly the same as intended.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#55 eje

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Posted 19 August 2006 - 04:21 PM

I'm not sure how close they are.  I wish there was somewhere I could go and ask for a small taste of Kummel!
[...]

View Post

Or even better, somewhere I could go and say, "Hey George, I just read about the Alice Mine Cocktail in the Savoy Coctail Book, could you whip one up for me?"
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#56 eje

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Posted 20 August 2006 - 01:45 PM

I found out some more about the Secrestat Bitters called for in the Alfonso Cocktail. It was a French made drinking (aperitif?) bitters and a popular "tonic" during prohibition in the US. Still not sure about the flavor profile.

Posted Image

Allen (Special) Cocktail

2/3 Plymouth Gin (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)
1/3 Maraschino Liqueur (3/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino)
Dash of Lemon Juice (Juice 1/6 lemon)

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.
(Garnished with an Toschi Amarena Cherry - eje)

---

The Maraschino is the featured ingredient here, with the mildly flavored Plymouth and the dash of lemon in the background. Sweet; but, not cloyingly so. If you really want to taste what Maraschino liqueur is about, this is a good cocktail to try.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#57 eje

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 08:53 PM

re: Alfonso Special

I may give another formulation a try janet. Honestly, though, while I like Bronx and Income Tax cocktails, I've never really liked Satan's Whiskers or similar cocktails. Or perhaps I've never had a well made one. In any case, with both the Alfonso Special and Satan's Whiskers cocktails, I never feel like there is any real magic going on. It seems like I can just taste the gin, vermouth, and orange liqueur and they just seem to be sitting there in the glass.

Posted Image

Allies Cocktail
1/2 Dry Gin (1 oz beefeaters)
1/2 French Vermouth (1 oz noilly pratt)
2 Dashes Kummel (1 dash linie aquavit 1 dash simple syrup)

Shake well (stir - eje) and strain into a cocktail glass.

Mostly this tastes like a fine beefeater martini. I think in this case, I may be missing some of the cocktail by substituting Aquavit. Sigh, well, once the credit card revolves, perhaps I will pick up some kummel and try this again.
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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
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#58 eje

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 12:20 PM

Oh, I get it!

Allies, as in the Triple Entente when France (French Vermouth), Russia (Russian Kummel), and England (English Gin) entered World War I in 1914!

In which case, the drink has to be made with Russian kummel!

By using Aquavit, I've allied France, England and Norway!

Obviously, I will have to re-do the Allies cocktail... Though, I think Gilka is the only brand of Kummel available and it comes from, horror of horrors, Germany!
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#59 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 26 August 2006 - 10:47 AM

Posted Image

Almond Cocktail (6 people)

Slightly warm 2 Glasses (2 oz Beefeaters) of Gin. Add a teaspoonful of powdered sugar (1/2 tsp. superfine). Soak in this 6 peeled almonds (4 halved and lightly roasted almonds) and if possible a crushed peach kernel (crushed plum kernel), and allow to cool. When the mixture is cold, add a dessertspoonful of Kirsch (1 tablespoon), one of Peach Brandy (1 tablespoon Massenez creme de peche), a glass of French Vermouth (1 oz Noilly Pratt) and 2 glasses of any sweet White Wine (2 oz Bonny Doon Riesling).

Shake thoroughly with plenty of ice.

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Duffy gives this the lascivious sounding alternate name, "A Young Girl's Fancy" in his "Mixer's Manual". For all the work, my wife and I both thought this an odd tasting cocktail. Nutty, peachy and slightly sweet. "6 peeled almonds" did make me wonder if it was meant to be green almonds, which might be more interesting. I think I missed the season for those, however.

I also had some pyro fun, lighting the gin and pouring a long burning stream over the almonds. My wife didn't approve, though. Something about burning down the house...

Edited by eje, 26 August 2006 - 10:51 AM.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#60 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 27 August 2006 - 11:16 AM

Posted Image

American Beauty Cocktail

1 Dash Creme de Menthe (Brizard)
1/4 Orange Juice (3/4 oz fresh squeezed)
1/4 Grenadine (3/4 oz homemade*)
1/4 French Vermouth (3/4 oz Noilly Pratt)
1/4 Brandy (3/4 oz Korbel VSOP)

Shake well and strain into a medium size glass and top with a little port wine (Warre's Warrior Porto).
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I didn't have a lot of hope for this one. I thought I would probably feel like spitting it out as soon as I tried it. However, it's an intriguing mix of flavors. Pomegranate and mint is an interesting combination. It looks pretty muddy; but, I blame my home made Grenadine for that.

*1 Cup Pomegranate Juice (Knudsen Just Pomegranate)
1 Cup Sugar
1/4 Cup Pomegranate Concentrate
1/4 Cup Vodka

Combine sugar with juice and shake until dissolved. Add Pomegranate Concentrate and Vodka.

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Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA