Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Pictorial: Joong/Jongzi-Sticky Rice/Bamboo Leaves

Chinese

  • Please log in to reply
51 replies to this topic

#1 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 04 June 2006 - 01:46 PM

Pictorial Recipe

Joong/Jongzi (Sticky Rice Wrapped in Bamboo Leaves) (鹹肉粽)

The fifth day of the fifth month (Lunar Calendar) is Dragon Boat Festival. The traditional treat for this festival is "Joong" [Cantonese], or "Jongzi" [Mandarin]. It is made from sticky rice and other ingredients/seasoning wrapped in a few bamboo leaves and boiled for a couple of hours. When ready to serve, simply heat up the joong and peel off the bamboo leaves.

I made 40+ joongs this year. This is a series of illustrations on how to make joong (with salted pork and other ingredients (we call "liu")). The cooking part is easy. Most of the efforts goes into preparations.

If you are learning how to make joong, don't need to make that many. Try making 5 or 10 to practice. Reduce the ingredient quantities proportionally.


Picture of the finished dish:
Posted Image


Serving Suggestion: 40


Preparations:
Main ingredients:
- Sticky rice (5 lb bag), use 2 1/2 bags (about 12-13 lbs)
- Mung beans (12 oz package), use 3 packs
- Salted eggs x 18 (3 packs, 6 eggs in each pack) or more
- Dried conpoy, about 30
- Dried black mushrooms, about 30 to 40
- Pork butt or pork shoulder, about 2 lb
- Raw peanuts (12 oz package), use 2 packs
- Chestnuts (ready to eat, 12 oz package), use 3 packs
- Dried shrimp (12 oz package), use 2 packs
- Laap Cheung (Chinese sausage). Use 10 (1 pack)
- 1 bag of dried bamboo leaves, about 150 Qty
- 1 roll of small strings to tie the joong

Posted Image
This is a bag of sticky rice, 5 lb package. Use 2 1/2 bags.

Posted Image
These are mung beans, 12 oz packages. Use 3 packs.

Posted Image
These are salted eggs, 6 eggs in each package. Use 3 packs (or more).

Posted Image
A close-up view of the salted eggs.

Posted Image
Dried conpoy. Use about 30.

Posted Image
Dried black mushrooms. Use about 30 to 40.

Posted Image
Pork Butt. Use about 2 lb.

Posted Image
Raw peanuts. 12 oz in a package. Use 2 packs would be enough.

Posted Image
Close-up view of the raw peanut package.

Posted Image
Chestnuts, already shelled and cooked, ready to eat. Use 3 packs.

Posted Image
Close-up view of the chestnut package.

Note: If you use raw chestnuts, you need to precook them and shell them before wrapping.

Posted Image
Dried shrimp, 4 oz in a package. Use 2 packs.

Posted Image
Laap Cheung (Chinese sausage). There are different flavors. I used the ones made with duck livers. There are 10 sausages in a package. Use 1 pack.

Posted Image
Dried bamboo leaves. Depending on how you wrap your joongs, you use 2, 3 or 4 leaves to wrap each one. I used 4 because my joongs are big. You may use 3 if they are smaller. Budget about 10% extra because some leaves do break during wrapping and cannot be used. Left-over, soaked bamboo leaves can be dried and store away for next year. They are very inexpensive anyway. (US$1.50 for a bag of 150 leaves or so).

Posted Image
Close-up view of the dried bamboo leave bundle.


The preparation of making joong starts the day before because many ingredients need to be soaked in water overnight.

Day 1:

Posted Image
Soak the sticky rice. Make sure you have enough water to cover the top.

Posted Image
Soak the mung beans. Make sure you have enough water to cover the top. They expand quite a bit.

Posted Image
Soak the dried conpoy.

Posted Image
Soak the black mushrooms.

Posted Image
Soak the raw peanuts.

Posted Image
Cut the pork butt into big pieces (1 inch by 2 inches). 1 piece of pork per joong.

Posted Image
To marinate (for 2 lb of meat): Add 2-3 tsp of light soy sauce, 2-3 tsp of dark soy sauce, 1-2 tsp of salt, 4 tsp of Shao Hsing cooking wine, 1 tsp of ground white pepper, 3-4 tsp of five spice powder.

Posted Image
Mix the ingredients well. Store in the refrigerator overnight.

Posted Image
Soak the bamboo leaves overnight in a small water bin.

Posted Image
Use something such as a soup bowl to weigh down the leaves to make sure they are all immersed in water.


Day 2: (1 hour before wrapping)

Posted Image
Soak the dried shrimp. It doesn't take long for them to become soft.

Posted Image
Drain the water from the soaked black mushrooms. Trim ends and cut mushrooms into thin slices (or dices).

Posted Image
Cut the Chinese sausages diagonally into 1/4 slices.

Posted Image
Break open all salted eggs. Separate the egg white from egg yolk. (Only use the egg yolks to make joong.) I cut the yolks into halves. You may use whole ones if you like.

Posted Image
Open the packages of the ready-to-eat chestnuts.

Posted Image
Drain the water from the soaked dried conpoy. (You may save the soaking liquid for cooking other dishes.) Pul the conpoy into shreds by hand.

Posted Image
Use a pan/wok. Set stove to high. Wait until pan is hot. Add 3 tblsp of cooking oil.

Posted Image
Drain the water from the soaked dried shrimp. Add the shrimp to the pan. Fry for a minute or two.

Posted Image
Add the sliced black mushrooms. Mix well and stir-fry for another 2 minutes.

Posted Image
Dash in 2-3 Shao Hsing cooking wine and 3 tsp of dark soy sauce. Mix well and cook for another 2 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside.

Posted Image
Drain the water from the soaking sticky rice. For each 4lb portion (there are 3 portions total), add 3-4 tsp of dark soy sauce, 1 tblsp of cooking oil and 1/2 to 1 tsp of salt.

Posted Image
Mix the dark soy sauce, oil and salt with the stick rice well.


Also, drain off the water from all other ingredients (e.g. mung beans, peanuts, etc.). Retreive the marinated pork from the refrigerator.


Posted Image
This is how the bamboo leaves look after being soaked overnight. Drain the water from the bin. Boil one pot of water.

Posted Image
Pour the pot of boiling water onto the bin. There are 2 reasons for this: 1) Sterilizatoin - killing off the molds that reside on the bamboo leaves. 2) Makes the leaves soft to make wrapping easier.

(Note: Many recipes call for boiling the bamboo leaves in a big pot or on a wok. Chef Dejah also suggested adding a little bit of vinegar in the water to make the leaves softer.)


Day 2: Wrapping of a joong

There are different wrapping methods. I am showing mine which uses 3 to 4 bamboo leaves.

There is an excellent web page (produced in Taiwan) that shows a video on how to wrap a joong. The page is written in Chinese. Click on the link at the upper left corner to view the video (about 7 minutes). The video was narrated in both Mandarin and English.

They wrap a small joong with only 2 leaves, but form a perfect tetrahedron shape. Perhaps I should do that next year.

http://edu.ocac.gov....ml/vod14_09.htm


Posted Image
Take one leave. Make it into a U-shape.

Posted Image
Take a second leave. Wrap on the outside of the first leave. This extends the "wall" to surround the joong ingredients. Hold the 2 leaves in one hand. It becomes easier to hold them when you have added the ingredients onto the leaves.

Posted Image
First add a few tblsp of sticky rice.

Posted Image
Add the mung beans.

Posted Image
Add the "highlight" ingredients: salted pork, salted egg yolk (half), 2 pieces of laap cheung.

Posted Image
Add shreds of conpoy, 1 or 2 chestnuts.

Posted Image
Add the stir-fried dried shrimp, black mushrooms and peanuts.

Posted Image
At this stage, add a third bamboo leave to extend the "wall" to hold the ingredients.

Posted Image
Add more mung beans.

Posted Image
Finish off with adding more sticky rice.

Posted Image
You may add a fourth leave to make it easier to close the joong. Just close the side and hold on to it in one hand.

Posted Image
Start to tie the string but wrapping it around the bamboo leaves. Wrap it around by 7 to 8 times or so. Close out the bottom of the joong by folding the leave ends back up towards the center. Wrap the string around the leave ends to secure.

Posted Image
This is how the joong looks like when the string is tied.

Repeat the same process to make more joongs until the ingredients are used up.


Cooking Instructions:

Posted Image
Cooking is the easy part. Just use a big pot. Lay the joongs inside the pot. Fill the pot up with water. Boil the joongs (with lid on) for about 2 hours. Add more water once about an hour into boiling. Reduce the stove setting to medium from high after the initial boil. Remove the joongs from the pot and serve.

You may need to divide the joongs into different batches and boil them one batch at a time, as most of us don't have a pot big enough to hold 40+ joongs.

Joongs may be kept in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. They also survive the freezing process rather well. If you make a big batch, you may spread it out the next couple of months to enjoy.


Posted Image
Serve each joong individually. Cut the strings and unwrap. Discard the bamboo leaves.

Posted Image
Picture of the finished dish. Serve with some slightly sweetened dark soy sauce.
  • stephen129 likes this
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#2 Jason Perlow

Jason Perlow
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 13,501 posts
  • Location:FL

Posted 04 June 2006 - 01:59 PM

Wow, that's a serious undertaking, Ah Leung.
Jason Perlow
Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters
offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | My Flickr photo stream

#3 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,327 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:54 AM

What shape did you call your joong? Ah Leung? :shock: :laugh: :raz:

And you razzes me about the amount of liu in my joong? :wacko: I imagine yours are quite rich, with all the ingredients and seasonings. How many can you eat at once?

With the batch I make, there's enough to share and keep in my freezer until the next round.
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#4 Sunny Simmons Steincamp

Sunny Simmons Steincamp
  • participating member
  • 202 posts
  • Location:Washington, DC Metro Area

Posted 05 June 2006 - 12:07 PM

Wow... those look seriously wonderful. I'm feeling industrious and just might try these. I'm a sucker for any sort of wrapped concoction... from meat pies to pasteles, turnovers to tamales. I've never had (or even heard of!) these, but I can't wait to give them a whirl. Thanks for such terrific instructions!

#5 Gastro888

Gastro888
  • participating member
  • 1,339 posts

Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:21 PM

Ah Leung Goh-goh, do you ever use pork belly in your joong? Is the pork butt what you traditionally use in your household? Your joong looks great, it just needs some pork fat for my taste. Then again, I love me some pork fat.

#6 Ben Hong

Ben Hong
  • participating member
  • 1,383 posts

Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:46 PM

Hey, it's the prodigal [/B]GASTROGIRL[B]. Welcome back Sweetums. Where, what, how and who have ya been???

(Ah loves me pork fat in joong too) :wub: .

#7 Gastro888

Gastro888
  • participating member
  • 1,339 posts

Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:51 PM

Hi all, I've been good. Moved up to NYC about 2 months ago. I got my first joong of the season from a friend of mine who's grandma is Toisanese. She didn't use any mung beans at all and that made the joong quite heavy for me. (Like it was ever considered light food in the first place!) I enjoyed it but it's nothing like my mom's joong which is sticky rice, mung beans, pork belly, salted chicken/duck egg, dried shrimp, lap cheong and lots of luv. (And a wee bit of nagging, but that's par for the course)

#8 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 05 June 2006 - 04:43 PM

Wow, that's a serious undertaking, Ah Leung.

View Post

You can say that again! :biggrin:

It took me 1+ hour for the prep works in Day 1. Another 1+ hour for the prep works in Day 2 before wrapping. And 3-4 hours (can't remember) to wrap 40+ joongs. I was working by myself and I didn't work that fast. :biggrin:

The wrapping part is best to recruit family members to help out... Get some cheap child labor in your house... :wink: :raz:

Doing this once a year should be good. No more often than that... :smile:
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#9 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 05 June 2006 - 04:48 PM

What shape did you call your joong? Ah Leung? :shock:  :laugh:  :raz:

View Post

I would say it's a tooth paste with both ends flattened? Tootsie Roll? :laugh:

Okay... from a solid geometry point of view, it is a cylinder intersecting two triangular prisms, one on each side, with the 2 prisms offset by a 90 degree angle along the axis of the cylinder...

Signed,
Ah Nerd Leung

Edited by hzrt8w, 05 June 2006 - 04:57 PM.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#10 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 05 June 2006 - 04:55 PM

Ah Leung Goh-goh, do you ever use pork belly in your joong?  Is the pork butt what you traditionally use in your household? 

View Post

Welcome back, Gastro Mui-Mui! We all miss your humorous postings! Did you bring your cheong-sam to the Big Apple? And the Gai Mo So? I thought you went learning to make Italian food in Europe! :biggrin:

Pork belly? Well... you know... The ruler of our house (and it ain't me :biggrin: ) has established a list of forbidden ingredients for cooking. I just have to cook without those. Tease me as you may... but no pork belly, no chicken dark meat (may be occassionally uplifted), no skin... et cetera, et cetera.
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#11 jo-mel

jo-mel
  • participating member
  • 1,633 posts
  • Location:New Jersey via Massachusetts

Posted 05 June 2006 - 05:14 PM

What shape did you call your joong? Ah Leung? :shock:  :laugh:  :raz:

View Post

I would say it's a tooth paste with both ends flattened? Tootsie Roll? :laugh:

Okay... from a solid geometry point of view, it is a cylinder intersecting two triangular prisms, one on each side, with the 2 prisms offset by a 90 degree angle along the axis of the cylinder...
Signed,
Ah Nerd Leung

View Post


Xiao hzrt -- You are sounding like Project! (No offense, Project --- just jesting!)

Well, with these Joonzi, you have outdone yourself! Aside from all the work involved, and the tasty results, the pictorial is fantastic!

Just one question -- the sweet rice you used is more of a longer grain than the rice I usually use when I use sweet rice. And the few times I've made these, I believe I used the plumper rice. Much difference?

#12 Gastro888

Gastro888
  • participating member
  • 1,339 posts

Posted 05 June 2006 - 05:39 PM

Pork belly?  Well...  you know...  The ruler of our house (and it ain't me  :biggrin: ) has established a list of forbidden ingredients for cooking.  I just have to cook without those.  Tease me as you may... but no pork belly, no chicken dark meat (may be occassionally uplifted), no skin... et cetera, et cetera.

View Post

Nope, I didn't head off to Europe. I stayed on US soil and moved to the Big Apple to persue my dreams of a career in the culinary industry "just-not-as-a-chef". :laugh: I've been doing PR work so far for a woman who's much like the main character in the Devil Wears Prada. HA! Anyways, life is good and I'm doing my foodie thing here in the city and loving life, as they say.

NO PORK BELLY?!?! AI YA!!!!!! Don't you find the texture of the joong to be kinda dry without the lovely fat from the pork? Goodness. That's true love - giving up pork belly! Let the record show that if there ain't no pork belly, there ain't no happiness in my household! hee hee

#13 sheetz

sheetz
  • participating member
  • 824 posts

Posted 06 June 2006 - 12:48 AM

Just one question -- the sweet rice you used is more of a longer grain than the rice I usually use when I use sweet rice. And the few times I've made these, I believe I used the plumper rice. Much difference?

View Post


I was going to comment on this as well. I've used both a thai longer grain sticky rice and the Chinese style short grained. To me, the thai rice needed to boiled longer than the Chinese rice to achieve the right consistency. Even though the Chinese rice is more expensive I will stick to using that in the future.

Love the pictorial Ah Leung!

#14 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 07 June 2006 - 01:05 AM

Just one question -- the sweet rice you used is more of a longer grain than the rice I usually use when I use sweet rice. And the few times I've made these, I believe I used the plumper rice. Much difference?

View Post

Much difference? Dun know.

I paid very little attention to where the rice was farmed: China or Thailand. When I saw the Chinese words on "Sticky Rice", I just grabbed the bag and go. I like this particular brand (Budhha) on their regular long grain rice. So I just picked their sticky rice as well.
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#15 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,327 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 07 June 2006 - 06:09 AM

The sweet rice/sticky rice that I use for joong is from Thailand.

There are 2 sizes/types of sticky/sweet rice, die nor mai, si nor mai. These are both available from China or Thailand. I have always used the si nor mai which is longer and skinnier grained just because my mom said that's the one to use. I DO use the die nor mai for lotus leaf nor mai fan.
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#16 wesza

wesza
  • participating member
  • 1,103 posts
  • Location:Seattle, Wa.

Posted 07 June 2006 - 05:07 PM

Ah Leung Goh-goh, do you ever use pork belly in your joong?  Is the pork butt what you traditionally use in your household? 

View Post

Welcome back, Gastro Mui-Mui! We all miss your humorous postings! Did you bring your cheong-sam to the Big Apple? And the Gai Mo So? I thought you went learning to make Italian food in Europe! :biggrin:

Pork belly? Well... you know... The ruler of our house (and it ain't me :biggrin: ) has established a list of forbidden ingredients for cooking. I just have to cook without those. Tease me as you may... but no pork belly, no chicken dark meat (may be occassionally uplifted), no skin... et cetera, et cetera.

View Post



Ah Leung:

Those of us who have had to learn to become accustomed to using lean Pork, Beef and Skinless Breast of Poultry are very pleased about your lovely wifes preferences.

I printed out and sent my daughter your complete posting of the recipe.

Her response was "Daddy you told me I could only use Pork Belly because the fat kept everything together" followed by, "it seems richer and should taste better so everyone will enjoy the Sticky Rice" but, "I want to still add the Sablefish (Black Cod)".

With 2 teenage granddaughters and one pre-teen I imagine your recipe will be very popular as it better meets their criteria and dainty appetites. (Huh) Every recipe you posted that I have had them check out on eGullet was something that they actually enjoyed preparing and have served to friends with allocates.

I think this year everyone will enjoy the Joong more, so I told her to make plenty so some could be kept in my freezer.

Thank you again,

Irwin :biggrin:
I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

#17 aznsailorboi

aznsailorboi
  • participating member
  • 298 posts
  • Location:Ventura, California

Posted 13 June 2006 - 10:31 AM

that girl in the video makes it look soooo easy to wrap them....ugh!!!! I bought the ingredients already but I wouldnt have time to make any untill the first week of july, I took a week off from work..i need it. hehe it will be a nice time to relax and cook. Although it didnt specify the cooking times in video, but it seems like the joongzi were small enough that they cook in half the time, but wouldnt the pork still a little too firm?
...a little bit of this, and a little bit of that....*slurp......^_^.....ehh I think more fish sauce.

#18 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,327 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 13 June 2006 - 02:44 PM

Although it didnt specify the cooking times in video, but it seems like the joongzi were small enough that they cook in half the time, but wouldnt the pork still a little too firm?

View Post


That depends on what cut of pork you use. If it's pork belly, then it would be fine. Even if it's a lean cut, the pieces are small enough that an hour and a half of constant boiling would still tenderize the meat.

The joong that I make require at least 2.5 hours. They are best at 3 hours.

Looks like I'll also be making them in July. June will be busy with visitors, student exams, field trips, etc.
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#19 miladyinsanity

miladyinsanity
  • participating member
  • 1,363 posts
  • Location:Manchester, UK

Posted 25 June 2007 - 05:10 AM

Hmmm... Nobody fries the rice before wrapping the joong? I don't know why my mom does it, but she does, and I think she fries it with the same ingredients with which Ah Leung mixes into the rice.

Also, this round, my mom experimented. Chicken makes good joong too. I don't eat pork belly, so this is great.
May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

#20 Fugu

Fugu
  • participating member
  • 298 posts

Posted 05 November 2007 - 03:12 AM

I just had to say thanks for posting this tutorial, Hzrt8w!

#21 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 05 November 2007 - 06:14 PM

u r welcome Fugu. And happy wrapping! :laugh: It is a labor-intensive thing. 50 joong took me 2 hours. And a sore back.
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#22 PopsicleToze

PopsicleToze
  • participating member
  • 944 posts

Posted 15 February 2008 - 10:11 AM

I'm making these for the first time this weekend. I bought all of the ingredients. However, I have a couple of questions.

The store here didn't have the split mung beans, so I bought whole ones, and they're not yellow, but green. Will this make too big of a difference or should I omit them?

The only chestnuts were sweetened and in a syrup. Again, use them or omit. However, they did have dried chestnuts. Should I go back and get those?

Thanks!

#23 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,327 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 15 February 2008 - 10:49 AM

I'm making these for the first time this weekend.  I bought all of the ingredients.  However, I have a couple of questions.
The store here didn't have the split mung beans, so I bought whole ones, and they're not yellow, but green.  Will this make too big of a difference or should I omit them?
The only chestnuts were sweetened and in a syrup.  Again, use them or omit.  However, they did have dried chestnuts.  Should I go back and get those?
Thanks!

View Post

I never put mung beans in my joong, so can't comment on that. But, mung beans are green.

Definitely get the dried chestnuts because you are, I presume, making savory joong. You'd need to soak them overnight to rehydrate before using.
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#24 PopsicleToze

PopsicleToze
  • participating member
  • 944 posts

Posted 15 February 2008 - 11:04 AM

Thank you.
Can't wait to try these.
I've been buying already prepared ones from the market, but there are not enough goodies on the inside. Homemade will be a treat.

#25 junehl

junehl
  • participating member
  • 122 posts

Posted 15 February 2008 - 12:35 PM

I like split mung bean in my joongzi! I don't think the whole mung bean would have the same texture and flavor as the split one.

Also, the whole mung bean normally takes longer to cook, so it may affect your cooking time, but then again if you're boiling the joongzi it may not make a difference.

#26 hzrt8w

hzrt8w
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,855 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA

Posted 17 February 2008 - 04:39 PM

The store here didn't have the split mung beans, so I bought whole ones, and they're not yellow, but green.  Will this make too big of a difference or should I omit them?

View Post

The green color is from the shells of mung beans. The shells are a little bit hard and not desirable to be used to make joong. My advice is to skip them if you can't get the shelled mung beans.
W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"

#27 PopsicleToze

PopsicleToze
  • participating member
  • 944 posts

Posted 18 February 2008 - 08:04 AM

Thanks for the great help. I was able to find the right mung beans and chestnuts. The only thing I didn't find was dried conpoy. I had never heard of it, and the ladies at the market didn't know what it was either, so I left it out. They were surprised I was making these, "Why you want to do this? It take soooo long." I buy the little packages premade at the store, but they were nothing like these. The ones they sell don't have all of the little goodies and are mostly rice. These were so much better.

The experience was great. It was a pretty extensive process and I ended up with about 15 little packages. They were great, and it was with great satisfaction that I ended up with one for Saturday night's dinner and one for a midnight snack. I froze the rest.

I wish I knew about conpoy and if they would have made a great difference. They look rather like dried scallops, or some kind of dried seafood, so I'm thinking they would have been great.

The dried shrimp are intense in taste, but I'm just not used to them. I wanted to use fresh shrimp sauteed with onions -- but that's just the South Louisiana coming out in me. I stuck to the authentic version, and I'm glad I did.

Again, thanks for all of the help. The joongzi were a lot of fun to make. My packages weren't as neat as the ones here, and some I had to use an extra leaf to wrap the outside, but I didn't have any seepage so they held up in the cooking process.

#28 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,327 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 18 February 2008 - 09:34 AM

I wish I knew about conpoy and if they would have made a great difference.  They look rather like dried scallops, or some kind of dried seafood, so I'm thinking they would have been great.
The dried shrimp are intense in taste, but I'm just not used to them.  I wanted to use fresh shrimp sauteed with onions -- but that's just the South Louisiana coming out in me.  I stuck to the authentic version, and I'm glad I did. 
Again, thanks for all of the help.  The joongzi were a lot of fun to make.  My packages weren't as neat as the ones here, and some I had to use an extra leaf to wrap the outside, but I didn't have any seepage so they held up in the cooking process.

View Post


What? No Pictures? :blink:

Conpoy is another name for dried scallops. It gets confusing sometimes with all these different names: mangetout for snow peas, aubergine for eggplant...

Conpoy adds lovely flavour to joong or jook (congee). Because they are more expensive, people like me often substitute with dried shrimp. I do use conpoy when my supply has lots of broken pieces.

Fresh marinated shrimp would not be the same in joong. You'd miss the intense flavour for the amount of rice involved. The texture wouldn't be the same either. It'd be better to enjoy your fresh Louisianna shrimp along side of the joong. :biggrin:

How many leaves did you use for each packet? Mine are quite large and I use 3 leaves for each one. I am down to the last dozen I made last summer. My 9 year old grandson can out-eat any adult. :wacko:

http://www.hillmanwe...oos/joong2.html
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#29 PopsicleToze

PopsicleToze
  • participating member
  • 944 posts

Posted 18 February 2008 - 11:36 AM

Typically I used 3-4 leaves, depending on how well I was doing on each one. On some, I took an additional leaf and wrapped around the outside before tying them up. They weren't all uniformly shaped, but that just adds to their character. :raz:

Thanks for the advice on the fresh shrimp. And I'll definitely try to find the conpoy next time.

Yeah--no pictures. I wanted to take them but the charger is missing on my camera. Next time I will definitely take some pictures to remember the occasion.

Thanks again. It was great fun.

Edited by PopsicleToze, 18 February 2008 - 11:36 AM.


#30 kbjesq

kbjesq
  • participating member
  • 457 posts
  • Location:East Coast of FL

Posted 04 August 2008 - 08:36 AM

My teenager and I made these yesterday. Forgive us, but we could not find some of the ingredients (we do not have any decent Asian markets in our area :angry: ) and also we do not eat pork, so we made some adjustments to your recipe. Also, we never had these before so we weren't sure what to expect. Right or wrong - we were very, very happy with the results and they were delicious!!! We had the laptop on the kitchen counter and we followed your pictorial in assembling and making our packages. Thank you for posting the pictorial. The instructions are clear and easy to follow - even for someone like me, who has never eaten joong/jongzti before. (I don't even know how to pronounce it)

The ingredients that we used: Chinese sweet rice seasoned as recommended, green mung beans (yellow could not be found!), dried shrimp (could not find conpoy), dried mushroom, vegetarian chorizo-style sausage, and peanuts. We sauteed the veggie sausage and mushrooms together. Ingredients (after soaking) ready for assembly:

Posted Image

We made about 25 packages (two pots full). Our wrapping is inartful but they held together! :laugh:

Posted Image

After we boiled them for 2 hours, we removed the wrappers and found extreme yumminess inside! The bamboo leaves imparted the most delicious flavor and scent to the rice and filling. I could definitely get addicted to these.

Posted Image

Posted Image





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Chinese