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Cookbooks Published in 2006

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#1 ludja

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 08:48 AM

Last year we had a good thread going with peoples comments and notifications of new cookbooks to look out for. Cookbooks published in 2005

I thought it would be a good idea to start the thread earlier this year to catch more of the new cookbooks published in the first half of the year.

A cookbook coming out in June that I'll check out is Emily Luchetti's new dessert cookbook, "Passion for Ice Cream". ($ for egullet if you order through this egullet-Amazon link)

Passion for Ice Cream (Hardcover)
by Emily Luchetti, Sheri Giblin

“There's chocolate, strawberry, and butter pecan; there's orange-cardamom, root beer granita, and pomegranate sorbet. There's popsicles, floats, and parfaits. And then there's Coffee Meringues with Coconut Ice Cream; Blackberry Sorbet Filled Peaches; and Chocolate Crepes with Peppermint Ice Cream. But wait...There's Shortcake and Rum Raisin Ice Cream Sandwiches; Sauternes Ice Cream and Apricot Sherbet Cake; and Chocolate Cupcakes Stuffed with Pistachio Ice Cream.”


Any cookbooks from this year that you've already bought or ones that you are looking forward to checking out?

edited to add: Here's a link with instructions on how to construct an eGullet-Amazon link. . Click

Edited by ludja, 31 May 2006 - 08:51 AM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#2 Mimi Sheraton

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 11:12 AM

Don't miss Washoku by Elizabeth Andoh (10 Speed Press)...A really valuable and innovative piece of work that explains the aesthetics of the Japanese kitchen with a detailed, well-written text, gorgeous color photos and intriguing, well-explained recipes. Even if you never cook from this - and there is no reason not to - these recipes will increase understanding and, therefore, appreciation of the Japanese cuisine.

#3 Pouncy

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Posted 31 May 2006 - 03:27 PM

Don't miss Washoku  by Elizabeth Andoh (10 Speed Press)...A really valuable and innovative piece of work that explains the aesthetics of the Japanese kitchen with a detailed, well-written text, gorgeous color photos and intriguing, well-explained recipes. Even if you never cook from this - and there is no reason not to - these recipes will increase understanding and, therefore, appreciation of the Japanese cuisine.

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Oh, that's useful. I'm moving to Yokosuka at the end of the year, so I'll be sure to pick that up.

#4 ludja

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 12:19 PM

I've enjoyed Deborah Madison's previous books and recipes very much, so I'll definately be checking out her new one:
Vegetable Soups from Deborah Madison's Kitchen (eGullet-Amazon link)

On the amazon link if you look at the full section on editorial reviews an excerpt is provided from a chapter on "Light Broths and Restorative Soups" including the following recipes:

Golden Broth
with slivered peas, cucumber, and yellow pepper

Chinese Celery and Shiitake Mushroom Broth
with thin somen noodles

Green Coriander and Ginger Broth
with tofu

Has anyone see this yet?

Edited by ludja, 01 June 2006 - 12:20 PM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#5 bloviatrix

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 12:41 PM

I have the Deborah Madison book. I made the black bean soup with coconut milk and lime - it did not go over well. Blovie told me never to make it again.
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#6 Shinboners

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 04:04 PM

From Australia:

Lotus by Teage Ezard - covers Chinese and South East Asian food with the main focus on street food.

Becasse by Justin North - French food with an Australian focus. Discussion here:
http://forums.egulle...showtopic=85780

Simple Chinese Cooking by Kylie Kwong - the title says it all

Danks Street Depot Cookbook by Jared Ingersoll - English, French, and Spanish food in an Australian context. Review and discussion here: http://forums.egulle...showtopic=85503
Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"

#7 cherrypi

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 11:02 AM

From Australia:

Lotus by Teage Ezard - covers Chinese and South East Asian food with the main focus on street food.

Becasse by Justin North - French food with an Australian focus.  Discussion here: 
http://forums.egulle...showtopic=85780

Simple Chinese Cooking by Kylie Kwong - the title says it all

Danks Street Depot Cookbook by Jared Ingersoll - English, French, and Spanish food in an Australian context.  Review and discussion  here:  http://forums.egulle...showtopic=85503

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Article on Kylie Kwong, with some recipes

#8 Shinboners

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Posted 03 June 2006 - 12:52 AM

A review of Lotus by Teage Ezard: http://forums.egulle...showtopic=88591

Also, Karen Martini, the chef behind The Melbourne Wine Room, Mr. Wolf, and Icebergs Dining Room has released a cookbook titled, "Where The Heart Is". It's a collection of recipes from her column in the Sunday Age newspaper, and the food is mainly homely Italian food. Later this year or early next year, she'll be releasing a book with her recipes from the Melbourne Wine Room.
Daniel Chan aka "Shinboners"

#9 Mikeb19

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 09:42 AM

"La Cuisine - c'est de l'amour, de l'art, de la technique" written by Hervé This and Pierre Gagnaire. Very good almost philisophical book (not really a cookbook in the traditional sense, although there are some 'recipes'). French only right now though.

#10 saltylj

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 03:12 PM

"La Cuisine - c'est de l'amour, de l'art, de la technique" written by Hervé This and Pierre Gagnaire.  Very good almost philisophical book (not really a cookbook in the traditional sense, although there are some 'recipes').  French only right now though.

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Oh why did you have to raise my hopes up like that, and dash them with the last sentence. You know youre into food when you seriously consider learning a language, even for only a second, to read a book.

#11 scottie

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 02:41 PM

"La Cuisine - c'est de l'amour, de l'art, de la technique" written by Hervé This and Pierre Gagnaire.  Very good almost philisophical book (not really a cookbook in the traditional sense, although there are some 'recipes').  French only right now though.

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Oh why did you have to raise my hopes up like that, and dash them with the last sentence. You know youre into food when you seriously consider learning a language, even for only a second, to read a book.

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Especially when you go so far as to buy a French-English dictionary. :rolleyes:

#12 mukki

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Posted 07 June 2006 - 05:17 PM

I'm also interested in "Passion for Ice Cream". I just discovered Ana Sortun's "Spice: Flavors of the Eastern Mediterranean". She's the chef/owner of Oleana in Cambridge, MA, which has an interesting menu based on mediterranean flavors.

#13 Alex

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 11:16 AM

By Bob Garlough and Angus Campbell, two of our Chef-Instructors here at Grand Rapids Community College, an incredible book: Modern Garde Manger: A Global Perspective. One of the Amazon.com reviewers wrote, "...for a number of years I taught Garde Manger at a Le Cordon Bleu school. I probably own every text book (sic) on the subject...This is probably the BEST text on this subject I have seen...."
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#14 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 08 June 2006 - 01:17 PM

Just bought Passion for Ice Cream. It looks fabulous. There's a article about ice cream in the Food Arts magazine and she's got a mention with picture from her book.

#15 mukki

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 10:51 AM

Some upcoming books for 2006 that I'll definitely be checking out:

Making Artisan Chocolates by Andrew Garrison Shotts
Essence of Chocolate: Recipes for Baking and Cooking with Fine Chocolate by John Scharffenberger
Tartine by Elisabeth Prueitt and Chad Robertson
Chocolate and Vanilla by Gale Gand (cover looks good, no hints re recipes contained therein, though)

Already published:
Simple Italian Sandwiches: Recipes from America's Favorite Panini Bar by Jennifer and Jason Denton

Edited by mukki, 24 August 2006 - 12:35 PM.


#16 duckduck

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 11:02 AM

Drew is doing a book? Cool! Thanks for the heads up mukki. I'm looking forward to that one. I love his stuff and you can never have too many chocolate books. :wink:
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#17 ludja

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 11:12 AM

Just bought Passion for Ice Cream.  It looks fabulous.  There's a article about ice cream in the Food Arts magazine and she's got a mention with picture from her book.

View Post

I have this out of the library right now and it will also be going on my list. She really has a creative array of dishes that sound great and are beautiful. I like the chapter called, "Fingers" for things like ice cream sandwiches.

Leite’s Culinaria has a few of Luchetti’s recipes from the book on the site:

Brown Sugar Ice Cream Chocolate Roulade
and
Milk Chocolate Wafer and Chai Ice Cream Dots

Edited by ludja, 24 August 2006 - 11:20 AM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#18 ludja

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 11:22 AM

A few other 2006 cookbooks I have out from the library:

Donuts: An American Passion by John T. Edge This is the last book in his Americana food series which has previously featured, Apple Pie, , Fried Chicken and Hamburgers and Fries. There are lots of interesting anecdotes from his visits to donut places around the country and also some background history. He gives some recipes including that for Zimmerman's Cake Donut which sounds fabulous.

Here's a description: click

John T. takes readers on a pilgrimage to the land of donut legend. He pays homage to the Salvation Army’s band of World War I Donut Lassies, to a California son of Japanese immigrants who stuffs donuts with jewel-like strawberries, to a New York City baker who weeps over his donut dough. He crosses the country sampling crullers and Bismarks, paczikis and beignets at diners, dives, and donut carts. And he introduces a collection of sweet and savory recipes along the way. Donuts is a peculiar collection of on-the-road adventures and historical anecdotes that charmingly illustrates a rich and complex portrait of American life.


Another interesting book that is beatifully done is: Dishes from the Wild Horse Desert: Norteno cooking of South Texas by Melissa Guerra. I haven't seen her earlier book, The Texas Provincial Kitchen to know how they compare.

Here is a review from Publisher's Weekly: click

Guerra, host of the PBS series The Texas Provincial Kitchen and author of a cookbook by that name, provides an overview of Texan border fare. More than 100 recipes are divided by type, such as "Salsa and Chiles," "Rice and Beans" and "Game and Goat," and the anecdotes preceding each recipe lend a warm, conversational tone. The region's flavorful cuisine is firmly rooted in Mexican tradition, with ingredients like corn tortillas, queso cotija (a common grating cheese), and either tomatoes or salsa appearing in most dishes. Spicy-food lovers will be thrilled, as chile peppers like serrano, ancho and chipotle infuse much of the food with fiery taste. Though some of the recipes may intimidate beginner cooks with their multiple steps and lengthy preparation, many, including Chalupas Compuestas ("Composed" Toasted Tortillas) and Migas con Huevos (Crumbs with Eggs), are simple enough for novices. Bold flavors continue into the desserts chapter, with Pepitoria (Pumpkin Seed Brittle) and Grapefruit Blossom Cake with Browned Butter Frosting. The color and b&w photos evoke the ranch culture the area is known for, and sidebars on regional traditions (e.g., instructions on grinding chiles for salsa, an explanation of local alcoholic beverages) further flesh out this culturally rich topic. (Apr.) (Publishers Weekly, January 30, 2006)



I'm looking forward to the Tartine book as well.

Edited by ludja, 24 August 2006 - 07:48 PM.

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#19 Gruzia

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 06:50 AM

a while back i heard the shirley corriher was coming out with a book on baking...anyone heard anything further on that?

#20 ludja

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Posted 25 August 2006 - 12:03 PM

...
I just discovered Ana Sortun's "Spice: Flavors of the Eastern Mediterranean". She's the chef/owner of Oleana in Cambridge, MA, which has an interesting menu based on mediterranean flavors.

View Post


I'm also interested in checking out Ana Sortun's book. My sister and her husband just had a spectacular meal at Oleana.

Here is an amazon link to the book: Spice: Flavors of the Eastern Mediterranean

Here is a LA Times review that also has sample recipes for:

Spoon lamb
Wilton's corn cakes with nasturtium butter
Arabic coffee pot de crème

The chapters of her book are organized by spice, and once you get the idea, the organizational structure makes perfect sense: It's about exploration and flavor profiles.

Want an appetizer? Begin with a handful of Aleppo chiles or a bowl of sumac (a Turkish spice that has a tart, lemony flavor and is a gorgeous dark rust). Your muhammara, a classic eggplant sauce thickened with nuts and heavy with spices, will come alive as you discover the central flavors used to build it.

If there's any drawback to the book, it's the long lists of specialty ingredients: the herb blend za'tar, nigella seeds, pomegranate molasses, grano — a whole durum wheat that's cooked like bulgur — and buckets of Greek yogurt. But, like the cookbook itself, finding and using these ingredients is utterly worth the exploration. When you're done, you'll have a pantry that looks — and smells — like Istanbul's spice bazaar.


THE recipes read like a cooking manual written by Scheherazade. Sortun directs you to toast spices, infuse creams and debone chicken while telling stories — in prefaces and in asides — of the women in Gaziantep from whom she learned how to cook Turkish food; how coriander grew in the Hanging Gardens of Babylon; and how her husband, a farmer, proposed to her in a grove of blood orange trees.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#21 suzilightning

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 06:55 AM

here is a link courtesy of Publisher's Weekly of some forthcoming cookbooks (though a bit tough to read):

http://www.publisher.../CA6363310.html
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#22 Carrot Top

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 10:28 AM

Don't miss Washoku  by Elizabeth Andoh (10 Speed Press)...A really valuable and innovative piece of work that explains the aesthetics of the Japanese kitchen with a detailed, well-written text, gorgeous color photos and intriguing, well-explained recipes. Even if you never cook from this - and there is no reason not to - these recipes will increase understanding and, therefore, appreciation of the Japanese cuisine.

View Post


Add my vote for "Washoku", with a note that the recipes are as good and delicious and workable as the rest of the book. With a thank-you to Suzi Sushi for first recommending the book on the eG Japan forum, here is a link to a review I wrote on "Washoku" this past Spring.

A further boon the book offers is that the food is for the most part *very* healthy, fresh, low-fat for those with an interest in those sorts of things. :smile:

#23 Lesley C

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Posted 27 August 2006 - 12:59 PM

Has anyone mentioned Dorie Greenspan's excellent new book, Baking: from my home to yours?
It's set for release in November and it's fantastic. I have an advance copy and have been baking all sorts of fabulous things from it for weeks including some wicked carrot muffins this morning for breakfast (only one recipe so far -- funnily enough, the blueberry muffins -- disappoints).

#24 ALTAF

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 10:07 AM

1-Has any one tried TARTINE?

2- Lesley: Can you give us please more info about greenspan's new book? (ex: the sytyle of baked good: american or european?) (new creative recipes or updates on oldies....etc)

#25 Lesley C

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Posted 28 August 2006 - 03:07 PM

I've been trying Tartine all week, excellent book. I have a few quibbles but otherwise it's a winner.
Greenspan's book includes both American and French recipes. Every one looks delicious, and really it's one of the only books I can say that about. I think it's a must have for any baker, an instant classic to be sure, and more accessible than the Martha Stewart baking book, which is gorgeous but somehow -- for me at least -- too long. Her pate brisee recipe is worth the price of the book alone. I'm going to try out some of the brownies next.
In a word: Beautiful. :smile:

#26 Kim Shook

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 09:25 AM

Has anyone seen Cindy Pawlcyn's Big Small Plates? It is being offered this month by The Good Cook book club and sounds like my kind of food (I always prefer the appetizers when I am out, plus I've had a gastric bypass and they are a better size for my appetite).

#27 danlepard

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 09:50 AM

Elizabeth Luard's book on truffles

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0711224935

I have no connection with it, but it's on my list. It should be great.

#28 rjwong

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Posted 01 September 2006 - 04:41 PM

Has anyone mentioned Dorie Greenspan's excellent new book, Baking: from my home to yours?
It's set for release in November and it's fantastic. I have an advance copy and have been baking all sorts of fabulous things from it for weeks including some wicked carrot muffins this morning for breakfast (only one recipe so far -- funnily enough, the blueberry muffins -- disappoints).

View Post


Baking: from my home to yours by Dorie Greenspan

I just bought it today at Costco.
Russell J. Wong aka "rjwong"

Food and I, we go way back ...

#29 Lesley C

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Posted 02 September 2006 - 06:35 PM

Get the Tartine book also. I made their brownies today. The best ever!

#30 ALTAF

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 12:01 PM

I just found out today on e-cook books site that "baking from my home to yours" is available now and was published on august!!. Also other books like caramel and king arthur flour whole grain baking will be released this month, earlier that AMAZON??

Any one got a clue? Is it true?





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