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Nut substitutes for allergy sufferers


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14 replies to this topic

#1 thegreatdane

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 03:21 PM

Hello,
Does anyone know of good substitutes for nuts that won't affect allergy sufferers? I'm looking for something that can be made spreadable, like a peanut butter, but not made with nuts.
Thanks,
Tom

#2 SweetSide

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 03:50 PM

You can buy soy nut butter in the grocery store. I know nothing about making it myself, but that is what the "peanut allergy" kids I know use.

However, I'm sure you are aware that soy is also one of the top allergens...
Cheryl, The Sweet Side

#3 flour girl

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 07:07 PM

Here's another one: www.sunbutter.com
One caveat - seed allergies are also on the rise. Hope you find what you are looking for. :smile:

#4 Saara

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 10:58 PM

Hemp seed butter is another option. A fairly expensive one, I admit. Try your local health food/co-op/natural grocery. I haven't had the butter, but the seeds are very good.

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Saara
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#5 thegreatdane

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 07:43 AM

Thanks, all. After posting, I called the local Whole Foods and asked. They pointed me towards Tahini (sesame) butter, and soy butter. I'm hoping to make a product that won't bother allergy sufferers but it's true that soy presents some problems for some people, and possibly sesame, too. It seems food allergies are on the rise. Or, our awareness of them. Now, I think I'll just make the best product I can and appeal to the most I can. Can't please all the people all the time. Too bad, because a friend's son is allergic to nuts and that's what got me on this in the first place. I may try the sun butter, too. I love sunflower seeds.

#6 Patrick S

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 08:07 AM

Hemp seed butter is another option. A fairly expensive one, I admit. Try your local health food/co-op/natural grocery. I haven't had the butter, but the seeds are very good.

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Hmm, I didn't realize there were people who actually enjoy eating hemp seeds!
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#7 Sebastian

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 12:36 PM

they're medicinal, right?

8-)

#8 thegreatdane

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 03:07 PM

they're medicinal, right?

8-)

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I thought they were outlawed here...

Drove the 'birds' crazy.

#9 Patrick S

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Posted 26 May 2006 - 04:04 PM

they're medicinal, right?

8-)

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Unfortunately, all the good stuff in hemp is in the trichomes of the plant. The medicinally good stuff, anyway.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#10 Sebastian

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 04:38 AM

i know, just playing to popular belief. Chocolate's anandamide actually stimulates the same THC receptors, although you'd have to consume roughly 27 lbs of it at one sitting to get the same effect, at which point you've probabaly got larger issues 8-)

#11 Patrick S

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 08:03 AM

i know, just playing to popular belief.  Chocolate's anandamide actually stimulates the same THC receptors, although you'd have to consume roughly 27 lbs of it at one sitting to get the same effect, at which point you've probabaly got larger issues 8-)

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That's interesting, Sebastian -- I never knew that chocolate contained anandamide!
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#12 Sebastian

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 12:48 PM

Chocolate inherantly has quite literally thousands and thousands of compounds..i keep a pretty good list of it at work, and there's many things in there where i've said 'who'da thunk it?' myself. Most of them, like the anandamide or phenylethylamine, while present, are there in such small amounts (caffeine is this way too - many folks believe chocolate's loaded with the stuff, when in fact it's just in there at pretty small lvls).

#13 Patrick S

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Posted 27 May 2006 - 01:18 PM

Chocolate inherantly has quite literally thousands and thousands of compounds..i keep a pretty good list of it at work, and there's many things in there where i've said 'who'da thunk it?' myself.  Most of them, like the anandamide or phenylethylamine, while present, are there in such small amounts (caffeine is this way too - many folks believe chocolate's loaded with the stuff, when in fact it's just in there at pretty small lvls).

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I realize that the levels of anandamide in chocolate are, for all practical purposes, physiologically insignificant. What makes it presence suprising is that anandamide and the cannabinoid system is found only animals, and not in any plant. Plants don't have the cannabinoid receptors that anandamide acts upon in animals, so it seems out of place.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi

#14 thegreatdane

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 12:20 PM

Chocolate inherantly has quite literally thousands and thousands of compounds..i keep a pretty good list of it at work, and there's many things in there where i've said 'who'da thunk it?' myself.  Most of them, like the anandamide or phenylethylamine, while present, are there in such small amounts (caffeine is this way too - many folks believe chocolate's loaded with the stuff, when in fact it's just in there at pretty small lvls).

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I realize that the levels of anandamide in chocolate are, for all practical purposes, physiologically insignificant. What makes it presence suprising is that anandamide and the cannabinoid system is found only animals, and not in any plant. Plants don't have the cannabinoid receptors that anandamide acts upon in animals, so it seems out of place.

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I seems out of place until we think of who cultivates, transports, and propagates seeds; animals. Plants make themselves attractive, or we select those that are, to continue their propagation. I think there's a book out with that theme, The Botany of Desire?

#15 Patrick S

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Posted 28 May 2006 - 12:51 PM

Chocolate inherantly has quite literally thousands and thousands of compounds..i keep a pretty good list of it at work, and there's many things in there where i've said 'who'da thunk it?' myself.  Most of them, like the anandamide or phenylethylamine, while present, are there in such small amounts (caffeine is this way too - many folks believe chocolate's loaded with the stuff, when in fact it's just in there at pretty small lvls).

View Post


I realize that the levels of anandamide in chocolate are, for all practical purposes, physiologically insignificant. What makes it presence suprising is that anandamide and the cannabinoid system is found only animals, and not in any plant. Plants don't have the cannabinoid receptors that anandamide acts upon in animals, so it seems out of place.

View Post


I seems out of place until we think of who cultivates, transports, and propagates seeds; animals. Plants make themselves attractive, or we select those that are, to continue their propagation. I think there's a book out with that theme, The Botany of Desire?

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Sure, but that still leaves the question: why would Theobroma cacao, apparently uniquely among the plant kingdom, produce anandamide? Even Cannabis sativa itself, which produces dozens of different cannabinoids, does not produce anandamide. And aside from that, my understanding is that the concentration of anandamide is, for all practical purposes, too low to be physiologically significant. If that is truly the case, then the function of anandamide can not be to make the plant appealing to animals. OTOH, I suppose its possible that the anandamide concentration, while too low to affect humans or most other animals, is sufficient to affect some anandamide super-sensitive species involved in scattering/distributing/propagating Theobroma cacao.
"If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished?" - Rumi