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Preserved Lemons


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164 replies to this topic

#151 andiesenji

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:51 PM



Thank you Andi! I was worried about using them, no more. :biggrin:


As long as the liquid doesn't smell like furniture polish, you are good to go.


I believe someone asked in another thread, "But what if your furniture polish smells like lemon?" :laugh:

Mine smelled lemony but not "off". They were definitely fine.



I'm talking about the smell you get with "Pledge" and "Murphy's Oil Soap" - there is a distinct difference.
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#152 patrickamory

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:53 PM

Ah, got it. Thanks andie.

#153 hangingfire

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:49 AM

Hi everyone; board newbie here. Also lemon preservation newbie concerned about food safety. I've read the rest of the posts but may have missed something; apologies if so.

I just took down my first batch of lemons, which has been quietly sitting on the kitchen shelf for about five weeks total. I opened it up and there was a slight whoosh of escaping air—not like the jar tried to explode or anything, but there was definitely pressure being released. The lemons smell fine and have no mold. Should I be worried? It's the air pressure release that has me a bit concerned. I know that it'd be pretty difficult for most bacteria to survive that much salt and acid, but—thought I'd ask if anyone had a similar experience or knew if this was a warning sign. Thanks!

#154 patrickamory

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 04:17 PM

I've eaten most of my first batch and I don't seem to have contracted anything. My guess is you're fine.

#155 liuzhou

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 05:36 PM

Here is a link to a Chinese ethnic minority version of preserved lemons which I am still using. They have been preserved for 15 years now. Had some yesterday.

#156 andiesenji

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 11:14 AM

The middle eastern store in which I shop has a big "pickle jar" (about 3 gallons) in which they have preserved lemons. The ones on the top, ready for use are in a plastic basket which occupies the top half of the container.
They lift it out and add new lemons and more salt to the bottom and the basket is replaced which pushes the new lemons to the bottom.
I think this is a very clever method of keeping a large batch (they sell a lot) of preserved lemons going. The lady told me that they dump the brine and replenish the salt with a new batch of lemons in the bottom about every six months. The preserved lemons look perfect on the outside, the insides look the same as the ones I have made at home and I have bought some and used them.
They taste exactly the same.
She tells me they have only refrigerated the batch when they close the store for their annual vacation when they put everything even remotely perishable in their walk-in fridge, even the stuff in the display fridges, because they have a backup generator for the walk-in in case of a power failure.
She says that people "back home" don't usually have fridges and the stores that sell stuff like this have limited fridge space so "preserving" means not having to refrigerate usually perishable items for use all year.
She mentioned that "back home" they preserve the grape leaves essentially the same way and they are never refrigerated.

Edited by andiesenji, 25 August 2012 - 11:15 AM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#157 Franci

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 02:24 PM

I'm almost out of preserved lemons, batch from June 2011. So I started a new jar yesterday following P. Wolfert 30 days recipe. I had a lot of peels, from the lemons I squeezed to fill my new jar.
I think I read here or somewhere else on the board that some people use the old pickling liquid to start a new batch. I decided against it but I still saved a small jar of the liquid...so it came natural to me to dump all the peels I had from squeezing the lemons in the old pickling liquid.
Do you think it's a bad idea? Should I add more salt?

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#158 patrickamory

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 02:35 PM

I think I remember Paula saying not to reuse the old liquid...

#159 Franci

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 11:33 PM

Thank you, Patrick! I'll toss it, better safe.

#160 vimaladevi

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:35 PM

Here's the recipe I use for preserving or pickling lemons...

http://www.paajaka.c...mon-pickle.html


Its says 10 days here, but I usually let it go for more like a month.
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#161 Jmahl

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 01:36 PM

Office Party 2012 001.JPG Lemon Picking 2012 005.JPG

Since this year our one lemon tree gave us hundreds of beautiful lemons we have put up this batch of preserved lemons, made lemon marmalade, lemoncillo, gave away lots of them and are using lemons on everything. It is a blessing.
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#162 Smithy

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 02:47 PM

*bump*

Someplace up-topic, a few people have asked whether there's any use for the brine of the lemons. I use a small amount of brine to add a kick to sauces or vinaigrettes. I also use the pulp in skillet-style dishes (stovetop cookery); the pulp adds flavor and a bit of texture. I don't know why people say to stick with the rind only.

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#163 f00b4r

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:07 PM

For those of you with sous vide equipment you may want to check out this method which turns out preserved lemons in 8 hours start to finish:

http://http://svkitchen.com/?p=614

#164 OliverB

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 04:55 PM

I just "found" mine in the back of the fridge, put them up about 2 years ago, never used them, never even opened them. Figured I'll trash them, but tasted a bit, quite good! There's no way anything will grow in that much salt and acid, and it seems they are good indefinitely. Mine are very very soft, but I'm gonna use them soon now. Not sure I'll put up more, since I can buy small jars and don't seem to need them much, but maybe once I use them more...

IMO there's very little danger for food poisoning, if something is bad you most likely will smell it and know it, nothing dangerous I'm aware of can grow in there. It's a simple technique that's been used for thousands of years by people w/o running water or much use of even the word "sanitary" :-)
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#165 scubadoo97

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:12 PM

Like you said very inhospitable environment for bacterial growth. As long as they didn't take up any metallic taste from a Ball jar lid you should be fine