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DEMO -- Italian Meringue Buttercream

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66 replies to this topic

#31 JustKay

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Posted 14 May 2006 - 11:03 PM

kthull, on the stand itself... back of where the bowl sits, there's a steel thingy where the bowl snaps in, I think that is where you can make adjustment to the bowl height? I think you only need to make a slight tweak. I can't find my manual but I recall reading about this beater/whisk level adjustment. You should get it working as it should ... makes life easier. I really mean it, I don't even stop to scrape my bowl, not even once, while making my marshmallows.
I used to have to do that with regular mixers to ensure the gelatine and syrup gets mixed in properly.

#32 lapasterie

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Posted 15 May 2006 - 06:48 PM

Kitchenaid makes a stronger 11 wire whisk for the 6 qt mixer.   kitchenaid products go to countertop appliances then to stand mixer attachments and then scroll down to wire whips.


Thanks for the info.

Mine is the 14cup model KP26M (scroll to the last one) . The stronger wire doesn't list this model number. :sad: I have emailed KA to ask. I just bought the replacement though. :wacko:

I'm using the flat beater now but I do think using the wire whip makes it a tad fluffier. :unsure:

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The stronger 11 wire whisk works with 6 qt mixer..KP,KB,KD models
So it should be fine with yours. If you click on VIEW by the whisk it tell you .
I have that model and it works.

Edited by lapasterie, 15 May 2006 - 06:53 PM.


#33 freddurf

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Posted 22 May 2006 - 11:35 PM

After a few days in the fridge, I notice my IMBC seems to lose it's flavor and tastes more like butter.  Has anyone else had this same experiance?

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Are you tasting it cold, or when it has returned to room temp? I've never had this problem when the buttercream is back to room temp.

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Ruth, I didn't mean to disappear on you! I caught a horrible cold. Anyway, I was adding only half of the flavor like you were when I noticed the loss of flavor. The last time I made it, I added the full 3 oz and it seems to be holding the flavor well.
So when you only add half, yours doesn't seem to change after a few days?

#34 RuthWells

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Posted 23 May 2006 - 10:59 AM

After a few days in the fridge, I notice my IMBC seems to lose it's flavor and tastes more like butter.  Has anyone else had this same experiance?

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Are you tasting it cold, or when it has returned to room temp? I've never had this problem when the buttercream is back to room temp.

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Ruth, I didn't mean to disappear on you! I caught a horrible cold. Anyway, I was adding only half of the flavor like you were when I noticed the loss of flavor. The last time I made it, I added the full 3 oz and it seems to be holding the flavor well.
So when you only add half, yours doesn't seem to change after a few days?

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Strange. I only ever use about 1.5 ounces of flavor, as the buttercream tends to separate on me when I add more, and I never have a problem with flavor fading. I wonder what everyone else's experiences have been?

#35 aznsailorboi

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 08:59 AM

help from the experts please :smile: ok, assuming i've got the IMBC down to the T. and I want to incorporate like a praline paste (im using ChiantG's recipe). how much of the paste should I be able to incorporate in this particular recipe without compromising the texture of the buttercream but still impart a full flavor from the paste?
...a little bit of this, and a little bit of that....*slurp......^_^.....ehh I think more fish sauce.

#36 alanamoana

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Posted 25 May 2006 - 11:00 AM

just add a little bit at a time until you get the flavor you want. i've been able to add quite a bit but it also depends on the texture of your praline paste. i was using macadamia nut paste and it was quite thin, so when i added a lot, it made for softer buttercream. still delicious, just a little more difficult to deal with on a cake. as a filling, it wouldn't have made too much of a difference.

#37 miladyinsanity

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 09:57 AM

Can I freeze the unflavored buttercream, then take out as needed to mix it flavor?

I've seen some references to freezing buttercream, but now I can't find them.
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#38 SweetSide

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 10:22 AM

Can I freeze the unflavored buttercream, then take out as needed to mix it flavor?

I've seen some references to freezing buttercream, but now I can't find them.

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Yup -- go right ahead. It freezes very well for several months. I put plastic wrap right on the surface to prevent ice crystals since I have a frost free freezer.

Let it warm up before re-beating and adding your flavoring.
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#39 Jerry_A

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 10:39 AM

Very beautiful demo, thank you!

The last time I attempted this I overwhipped my eggwhites until they were dry :blush: but still tried to finish the buttercream...not good! Next time I will follow this to the letter, your buttercream looks fantastic!

#40 miladyinsanity

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 12:57 PM

Can I freeze the unflavored buttercream, then take out as needed to mix it flavor?

I've seen some references to freezing buttercream, but now I can't find them.

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Yup -- go right ahead. It freezes very well for several months. I put plastic wrap right on the surface to prevent ice crystals since I have a frost free freezer.

Let it warm up before re-beating and adding your flavoring.

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Thank you!
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#41 Kris

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Posted 31 December 2006 - 04:48 PM

I've made this type of buttercream many times, however, it always seems to take longer than 5 minutes for the mixture to cool down. I get worried and a few times I've added the butter too soon because I was concerned that I would overwhip italian meringue while waiting for it to cool. I managed to recover the buttercream those times but I want to get a feel for how long it has taken for others to cool the meringue. So has anyone else had to wait longer than 5 min. for the bowl to feel cool?

Thanks!
Chris

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Yes, I find that it's closer to 15-20 mins. for the bowl to be cool and not warm or even tepid.

I love Italian Meringue Buttercream. :wub: So does my family. My mother swoons over it and when I make her a pineapple or lemon coconut cake, it's the icing recipe I use.

#42 GTO

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Posted 01 January 2007 - 07:11 AM

I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.
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#43 RuthWells

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 08:50 AM

I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

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Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

#44 oli

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Posted 02 January 2007 - 04:36 PM

I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

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Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

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Great demo and nice photos. I have made this item a few times and it comes out beautifully each time and I use it right away. Last week I made another batch and decided to place it in the refrig. and decorate the cake the next day. The IBC was hard and impossible to get back to the nice fluffy state. I nuked it for 20 secs. and used the paddle on it to no avail. So I dumped it and had to make another batch, so I've made a note to myself not to refrig. next time.

#45 RuthWells

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 07:44 AM

I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

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Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

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Great demo and nice photos. I have made this item a few times and it comes out beautifully each time and I use it right away. Last week I made another batch and decided to place it in the refrig. and decorate the cake the next day. The IBC was hard and impossible to get back to the nice fluffy state. I nuked it for 20 secs. and used the paddle on it to no avail. So I dumped it and had to make another batch, so I've made a note to myself not to refrig. next time.

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That is curious -- I refrige this buttercream all the time (I even freeze it) with no ill effect. The key is to let it come back to room temp gradually, over several hours, on the counter before rebeating. The high butter content does render it pretty solid straight out of the fridge.

#46 oli

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 08:12 AM

I usually only skim over the pictures in these kinds of demonstrations but I actually read this one right the way through.

Little tips like re-warming the bowl with a hot towel, make it all a lot less daunting. Well done, Ruth.

View Post


Gee, thanks -- I'm glad people are getting some use out of this demo!

View Post

Great demo and nice photos. I have made this item a few times and it comes out beautifully each time and I use it right away. Last week I made another batch and decided to place it in the refrig. and decorate the cake the next day. The IBC was hard and impossible to get back to the nice fluffy state. I nuked it for 20 secs. and used the paddle on it to no avail. So I dumped it and had to make another batch, so I've made a note to myself not to refrig. next time.

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That is curious -- I refrige this buttercream all the time (I even freeze it) with no ill effect. The key is to let it come back to room temp gradually, over several hours, on the counter before rebeating. The high butter content does render it pretty solid straight out of the fridge.

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Yes I think you are correct. I didn't let it come back to room temp, I just took it from the refrig. nuked it and then beat it.

#47 JeanneCake

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Posted 03 January 2007 - 08:42 AM

It's better to give it a few hours at rm temp but if you are stuck, this method might work for you. If you can, refrigerate it in ziplock bags - press out as much air as possible. When you're ready to use it, break it apart into chunks into the mixer bowl.

Take no more than 1/3 of it and zap that in the microwave until it is soft (not melted into a liquid, but very soft - it should take only a few seconds). Using the flat beater on low speed, add a little bit of the softened buttercream and let it go for a minute or two. Then add more of the softened buttercream. If it doesn't seem to be coming together after 2-3 mins, take a little more out and zap it again. If it breaks, it might not come back at all so you have to be a little cautious. (If the kitchen is quite cold, it will take longer than if the kitchen is warm.) Sometimes I've been known to wave the blowtorch around the outside of the mixer bowl for a few seconds just to help it along. But you have to keep it moving constantly or you risk scorching. You're just trying to warm up the sides of the bowl, not trying to melt it.

#48 ablosh

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Posted 14 January 2007 - 12:58 AM

on a kitchenaid, sometimes the attachment doens't reach the very bottom of the bowl. i attach the attachment, but don't lock it in. this is kind of hard to explain, but...i don't shove it upwards and turn, you know? the attachment stays on, but reaches teh very bottom of the mixing bowl and always incoporates ALL of what's down there. maybe there would be less chance of a lump of sugar at the bottom if you tried this?
i made this frosting for the first time today, and...i didn't like it!  it tasted like butter to me, even with vanilla paste. at room temperature, it was stiff and...had a greasy mouthfeel. i used a different recipe that called for three egg whites and two stick of soft butter. i'm sad, and convinced somethign went wrong.

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I will surely try that tip! Thanks Cathryn! I have the same problem with the kitchenaid beater not reaching the very bottom...which is why I have to always scrape the bottom for "settled" or stuck ingredients.
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#49 lorinda

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 04:43 AM

For those who have tried both, which do you prefer: IMBC or Neoclassic Buttercream (as per RLB)?
Neoclassic buttercream seems easier to make, but would it taste too eggy and be less light and fluffy on account of not having any whites?
I want to make a lemon buttercream for cake filling by combining lemon curd from Fine Cooking (from the Best Lemon Curd thread) with a buttercream to make it less runny, and find IMBC somewhat daunting. When I made it recently, it looked curdled, I gave up on it, then put it in a sink of cold water and rebeat it and it came together quite miraculously, but was a rather stressful experience.
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#50 miladyinsanity

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 07:02 AM

Well, I usually make Neoclassic, but I use Flo Braker's recipe.

I've used this IMBC recipe, but I find that I like egg yolk buttercreams better usually.
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#51 RuthWells

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 11:07 AM

The egg yolk buttercreams, such as RLB's neoclassic, have a richer flavor than the egg white buttercreams. They are also not as fluffy, as you describe, and are much softer than egg white buttercreams. If you're really concerned about stability (if you're piping decorations, say, or layering multiple layers with the buttercream), I'd stick with the IMBC.

As for the curdling you experienced while making the IMBC, is it almost always a question of temperature. If it happens again, place your hands on the outside of your mixing bowl. If it feels cool, wrap a hot, wet dish towel around the bowl and continue to beat. You'll see it come together beautifully. If the bowl feels warm or hot, stop adding butter until it feels barely warm to the touch.


For those who have tried both, which do you prefer: IMBC or Neoclassic Buttercream (as per RLB)?
Neoclassic buttercream seems easier to make, but would it taste too eggy and be less light and fluffy on account of not having any whites?
I want to make a lemon buttercream for cake filling by combining lemon curd from Fine Cooking (from the Best Lemon Curd thread) with a buttercream to make it less runny, and find IMBC somewhat daunting. When I made it recently, it looked curdled, I gave up on it, then put it in a sink of cold water and rebeat it and it came together quite miraculously, but was a rather stressful experience.

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#52 lorinda

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Posted 16 January 2007 - 01:19 PM

Thanks for your replies Ruth and May. I think I'll go with the IMBC for the stability, as I will be making 4 layers of cake/3 layers filling. Plus it'll give me a chance to use up all those egg whites in the freezer.
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#53 miladyinsanity

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 05:37 AM

Freezer?

I thought frozen egg whites don't whip up?
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#54 RuthWells

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 08:41 AM

Freezer?

I thought frozen egg whites don't whip up?

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As long as they were completely yolk and grease free when frozen, they whip up fine. In fact, some say they whip up higher than fresh whites, but I've never tested that theory.

#55 JeanneCake

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 01:33 PM

Freezer?

I thought frozen egg whites don't whip up?

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The commercially frozen whites are a problem - I've only been successful when subbing out no more than 30% of the total weight of whites with the commercially frozen ones. When I use all commercial whites, it deflates when you add the hot syrup. Doesn't matter which brand, either - it happens using Sysco, Glen View Farms, Papetti....

But if you are talking about freezing your own shelled whites, that's different. As Ruth says, it should work perfectly if you don't have any specks of yolk in them.

#56 miladyinsanity

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 05:40 AM

Freezer?

I thought frozen egg whites don't whip up?

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The commercially frozen whites are a problem - I've only been successful when subbing out no more than 30% of the total weight of whites with the commercially frozen ones. When I use all commercial whites, it deflates when you add the hot syrup. Doesn't matter which brand, either - it happens using Sysco, Glen View Farms, Papetti....

But if you are talking about freezing your own shelled whites, that's different. As Ruth says, it should work perfectly if you don't have any specks of yolk in them.

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Ah. Thanks Jeanne and Ruth!
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#57 lorinda

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 06:13 AM

I made 2 batches of IMBC today with frozen egg whites and it whipped up just the same as with fresh whites. Thanks Ruth for the terrific demo, which gave me the confidence to give this a go. The first time, the butter must have been a bit cool going in so I tried the hot teatowel and it worked a treat. Second time, the butter had been out a bit longer so it didn't need the hot teatowel. I also made raspberry IMBC by adding some raspberry puree according to RLB's recipe and even though you don't need to add much, the BC is a very nice bright pink colour, lovely!
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#58 RuthWells

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:07 AM

Thanks for posting your success, Lorinda! Glad the demo helped.

I made 2 batches of IMBC today with frozen egg whites and it whipped up just the same as with fresh whites. Thanks Ruth for the terrific demo, which gave me the confidence to give this a go.  The first time, the butter must have been a bit cool going in so I tried the hot teatowel and it worked a treat. Second time, the butter had been out a bit longer so it didn't need the hot teatowel. I also made raspberry IMBC by adding some raspberry puree according to RLB's recipe and even though you don't need to add much, the BC is a very nice bright pink colour, lovely!

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#59 gizmo-shadow

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 02:43 PM

Thank you for the fantastic demo Ruth. I should try this recipe.

I have tried making IMBC using Martha Stewart's recipe and I see little lumps of butter when icing the cake. I use the whisk instead of the paddle. What am I doing wrong?

What other flavours can you mix in with IMBC?

#60 JeanneCake

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 07:01 PM

The last few tablespoons of butter may not have been incorporated well enough before you stopped mixing (whipping) - this happens to me sometimes when I am in a rush and the butter is cool/cold. There's a balance you can play with of how long you let the meringue go after all the syrup is added and the temperature of the butter. If the meringue is warm, I can use cooler butter; if the meringue is cool, softer butter incorporates a lot better.





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